Archive for the ‘cars for sale’ Category

PostHeaderIcon Car for Sale: Maserati MC12 GT1

In GT racing, the Maserati MC12 is remembered as a ferociously effective car in the GT1 class, racking up numerous race wins and titles in the now-defunct FIA GT Championship. With a career spanning seven seasons, it was the car to beat in Europe but it never caused much of a stir in North-America. Risi Competizione first campaigned one with help from AF Corse in 2005 with special dispensation from IMSA. It stood out and this was no mean feat given it shared grids with the Saleen S7, the Aston Martin DBR9, the Corvette C6.R, and the Dodge Viper GTS-R but it never delivered on its promise. Two years later, in 2007, storied Swiss-American squad Doran Lista brought the MC12 back to the American Le Mans Series and the car you see here is that exact car driven twice in the ALMS 12 years ago. We know you want it and so do we.

The Maserati MC12 is one of those cars that divides opinions: some consider it to be ridiculous with its race car-inspired physique that reminds you more of a ’90s homologation special model such as Porsche’s 911 GT1 rather than a ’00s supercar while others can’t stop praising both its appearance and its performance. On the race tracks, though, there was no room for such arguments: the MC12 was the dominant force in the FIA GT between 2005 and 2009 with Michael Bartels’ Team Vitaphone becoming the de facto Maserati team during the car’s tenure at the top of the GT1 pile. But can a car that never competed at Le Mans and that was never competitive in America really be considered great? Share with us your opinions in the comment section below, but not before you go through the story of this unique racer.

PostHeaderIcon Car for Sale: a 2012 Bugatti Veyron for $128,000 – Better Look Twice

How badly do you want to own a Bugatti Veyron? Do you want one bad enough that you’re willing to spend $125,000 to $128,000 for a Veyron that really isn’t a Veyron, but looks like a Veyron? If your answer is “yes,” then you should go take a look at this 2012 Bugatti Veyron that’s up on sale at Car Export America.

Before you start tripping over yourselves rushing to buy this unique Veyron, you need to know that this is a replica Veyron and not the real deal. You also need to know that this replica Veyron sits on the shell of a 2002 Mercury Cougar. Yes, a Mercury Cougar. Think of it whatever you will, but there’s something oddly appealing about this replica Veyron. It’s not the real thing, sure, but where else can you see a Veyron that traces its roots to a Cougar? Nowhere else, I imagine.

PostHeaderIcon Car for Sale: 1985 ASC McLaren 5.0SC Convertible

Ford moved the Mustang to the then-new Fox platform for the 1979 model year and, at the same time, Mercury introduced the second-generation Capri as a Mustang with a posh interior that was more expensive but, mechanically, almost identical. The cream of the crop were the Capris modified by ASC and McLaren between 1984 and 1986 and, with only 933 Capris ever updated to ASC/McLaren specification, they are particularly rare and hard to find. This one you see here was offered on Craigslist and is said to be one of just 257 units converted in 1985 and one of just 94 originally painted in Oxford White that year.

In the ’70s, if you wanted to try out Ford Cologne’s attempt at building a Mustang for the European market but you didn’t live in Europe, you got yourself a Mercury Capri. As a $2,300 (in 1970) economical sports coupe, the original Capri was what’s known as a ’captive import’ – a car made outside of the U.S. borders but sold Stateside under a different badge while not carrying any divisional identification. In ’72, the Mercury Capri became the first car sold by a Ford-owned brand in the U.S. to feature a V-6 as Mercury introduced a version powered by the 2.6-liter Cologne V-6 engine. In 1976, Mercury followed in the footsteps of the Europeans and started selling the Mark II Capri but the drivetrain remained common with the Ford Pinto, Ford Mustang II, and Mercury Bobcat. The ties between the Capri and the Mustang became closer three years later when the Capri returned on the market as a sports car based on the Fox platform. This is where the story of this car begins in earnest.

PostHeaderIcon Want a Real Ford Boss 302FRS Race Car? Well, You Can Have It If You’re Quick Enough and Have $45K

It’s one thing to buy a 2020 Ford Mustang for around $37,000; it’s another thing entirely to add somewhere in the vicinity of $8,000 to $10,000 to buy aFord Mustang Boss 302 from the Ford Performance Racing School. Given a choice, which one would you go for? Yes, the Ford Performance Racing School is selling 14 of its heavily modified Mustang Boss 302FRS race cars for just $45,000. That’s the good news. No, it’s great news. The bad news is that you just can’t call the school and tell them that you’re interested in one of the 14 Boss 302FRS racers. You need to have attended one of the school’s programs to be eligible to buy these race cars. If you do belong to this exclusive list, you can buy one of the 14, provided there’s any left. Should you get the nod, the race cars will be available for pick up by October 20, 2019, and you’re going to be responsible for picking the car up, possibly at the Ford Performance Racing School in Grantsville, Utah.

PostHeaderIcon Auction Watch: $1.5 Million Aston DB5 Shooting Brake Built To Allow David Brown To Carry His Dog

The Aston Martin DB5 is one of the most famous cars in the world thanks to its role as James Bond’s means of transportation in the first two James Bond movie adaptations of Ian Fleming’s novels. The Silver Birch beauty with coachwork by Touring became a star thanks to its myriad of hidden weapons and clever equipment added by the Q branch. While the cars actually used during filming or during the promotion of the two films starring Sean Connery are the rarest, the ones that are the most practical are also insanely rare. These are the long-roofed ’Shooting Brake’ DB5s built in period by coachbuilder Harold Radford after then-company-owner David Brown complained that the DB5 isn’t practical enough and he can’t take his dog with him when hunting. Only 12 were ever built and this is one of just four with the steering wheel on the left-hand side.

PostHeaderIcon Auction Watch: $1.5 Million Aston DB5 Shooting Brake Built To Allow David Brown To Carry His Dog

The Aston Martin DB5 is one of the most famous cars in the world thanks to its role as James Bond’s means of transportation in the first two James Bond movie adaptations of Ian Fleming’s novels. The Silver Birch beauty with coachwork by Touring became a star thanks to its myriad of hidden weapons and clever equipment added by the Q branch. While the cars actually used during filming or during the promotion of the two films starring Sean Connery are the rarest, the ones that are the most practical are also insanely rare. These are the long-roofed ’Shooting Brake’ DB5s built in period by coachbuilder Harold Radford after then-company-owner David Brown complained that the DB5 isn’t practical enough and he can’t take his dog with him when hunting. Only 12 were ever built and this is one of just four with the steering wheel on the left-hand side.

PostHeaderIcon Is This eBay Listing for an $800,000 Ferrari LaFerrari Engine Legit?

Oh my God! A LaFerrari V-12 engine for just $800,000? Let me buy it off this eBay auction right away! Said no one ever. The dude who posted this ad thought he could actually make some quick buck – actually a lot of bucks – from a vague description with poor grammar? This is what the posting read: “2017 FERRARI LA FERRARI ENGINE with 20 miles … very important.. [sic] Ferrari will not build no more [sic] Laferrari engine for stock … so get it while you can.” Really?

PostHeaderIcon A $50,000 Windshield Isn’t the Only Outrageously Expensive Part on this One-Off Porsche 911 (993) Speedster

The Porsche 911 (993) is one of the most sought-after Porsche 911 models in history. Its place in history is secure as the last 911 generation to feature an air-cooled engine. It’s considered the grail among grails, the kind of car that routinely sells for around $200,000. Now imagine a scenario where the grail among grails gets even rarer. Should we call it the grail among the grails among grails? That’d be too confusing so let’s just call it by its actual name: the Porsche 911 (993) Speedster.

The 993 Speedster is so rare that Porsche actually built just two units of the model, one for Ferdinand Alexander Porsche for his 60th birthday in 1995 and another for TV comedian Jerry Seinfeld. In other words, you have a better shot at finding Narnia than spotting an actual 993 Speedster on the road. But, just because these two models are a sight unseen, that doesn’t mean that we can’t see proper replicas that carry the exclusive essence of the 993 Speedster in the proudest way imaginable.

That’s the case with John Sarkisyan, who many of you know is an ace in the classic car restoration and modification scene. Sarkisyan is the man responsible for the Steampunk Porsche 911 and the Mercedes 300SL Gullwing, both of which were created on the bones of different models. Sarkisyan’s latest project is this stunning Porsche 993 Speedster, which started its life as a 993 Convertible. This is proper aftermarket tuning done to the absolute peak of its powers. It’s no wonder that, in recreating the 993 Speedster, Sarkisyan ponied up a significant amount of money, including dropping $50,000 on the car’s windshield. Believe it or not, the $50,000 windshield isn’t the only outrageously expensive part of this recreated Porsche 993 Speedster. Then again, that’s the kind of price you have to pay if you want to build yourself a model where there are only two actual ones in existence.

PostHeaderIcon Would You Pay $14,000 for a 2000 Toyota Tacoma With 7,000 Miles on the clock?

The Toyota Tacoma is a classic example of ’looks don’t matter’. This pickup truck is one of the most plain-looking models to have graced the industry, but even today, people swear by its durability and reliability. Despite the invasion of modern trucks, the craze for the Tacoma is still pretty high and it doesn’t seem like it will die anytime soon. Because of this, the Tacoma enjoys a high resale value. Tacomas that have clocked five-, or six-digit miles still manage to sell in the used market without any effort. The latest example of the same was a mint-condition 2000 Tacoma that had just 7,000-odd miles on the odo. Despite being a 19-year old model, the owner demanded $14,000 for it, and I’m guessing it was sold pretty soon because the original poster has already deleted the ad.

PostHeaderIcon The Gruppe5 BMW 2002 Is An 800 Horsepower Blast From The Past with a $1 Million Price Tag

When you bring together one the best BMW engine builders and tuners with one of the best chassis and body designers of the last few decades, you’re bound to get an amazing product. Take it a step further, and task them with re-imagining BMW’s diminutive two-door hit of the late ’60s and early ’70s, the 2002, into a bona fide racer with a Group 5-inspired body kit and as much power as a McLaren 650S. You’ll end up with something like the
Gruppe5 2002, a $1 million, flared pocket rocket that you didn’t know you wanted.

Actually; a carbon fiber body with boxy arches and an enormous rear wing that acts as a cage for a 744 horsepower V-10. That’s what you get, plus a lot more, if you wire $875,000 to Gruppe5’s account. Add $100,000 more, and you’ll get 803 horsepower from a bigger version of that same V-10. The catch is that Gruppe5 only plans to build 300 of these bonkers 2002s, 200 with the 744 horsepower engine and 100 with the 803 horsepower unit installed in front of the cabin. When will the renders you see turn into a running and driving car? Pretty soon since Bill and Bob Riley, two of the co-founders of the project as well as the driving power behind Riley Automotive will get cracking after Bob returns from the 24 Hours of Le Mans in June. Now, if the name Riley rings any bells, I bet you now understand why this thing will cost as much as two Ferrari 812 Superfasts brimming with options. Oh, and that engine guy is none other than Steve Dinan, the founder of Dinan Cars and reputable Daytona Prototype-era engine builder.

PostHeaderIcon Car for Sale: Practically New 1981 Triumph TR8

In the annals of sports car lore, there are some models that, for one reason or another, don’t get the attention they deserve. The Triumph TR8 counts as one of them. It only had a three-year run (1978 to 1981), which contributes to the lack of awareness of the car, though Triumph’s fledgling state at that time also contributed to the TR8’s short-lived turn in the spotlight. All that said, the TR8 was still a sight to behold, and the fact that Triumph didn’t get a chance to build many units has increased its provenance. Well, there’s one TR8 that’s for sale on eBay Motors, and it only has 90 miles on it. Perhaps now’s the time to buy one?

PostHeaderIcon Car for sale: 2001 Cadillac Northstar LMP01 Raced At Le Mans And Now It Could Be Yours

Remember the Cadillac Northstar engines? They were a bunch of highly-advanced, DOHC V-6 and V-8 engines built by Cadillac from the ’90s all the way to 2011. In the early days of the Third Millenium, the Northstar made its way into prototype racing in the middle of the Riley & Scott-developed Cadillac LMP that raced for just three years. This is the fourth chassis ever made, and it was raced by the factory in the American Le Mans Series and at Le Mans in 2000 and 2001. Sadly, unlike the current Cadillac DPi-V.R, the LMP project was ambitious, but the money flow stopped just as the car was getting good and GM ditched its plans of replicating Ford’s Le Mans glory.

Believe it or not, Cadillac first raced at Le Mans in the year 1950 when Briggs S. Cunningham brought two Series 61 models, the first Americans to race at Le Mans in two decades. One of the two Caddies featured an aerodynamic bodywork designed in the Grumman Aircraft wind tunnel with the aim being to achieve a low drag coefficient. Half a century later, Cadillac returned at Le Mans with an angular-looking prototype that, while looking quite a bit like Cadillac’s products at the time, was underpinned by a proven chassis. The problem, though, was the engine. It was always about the Northstar, and it took Cadillac two years to make it reliable and then, in year number three, they finally started working on performance, and the results started to come. The fourth year was supposed to be the one when everything came together, and the target was locked on the laurels everyone was after – but it never happened.

PostHeaderIcon You Can Get a Used Alfa Romeo 4C for Dirt Cheap Right Now

It should come as no surprise that we’re huge fans of the Alfa Romeo 4C. Making its formal debut in 2013, the 4C was the first mass-production model Alfa offered to the U.S. market in nearly two decades. And what a comeback – this thing offers low-weight, mid-engine, carbon-intensive thrills, plus jaw-dropping Italian styling, all without the high-entry price of a traditional supercar. Now, according to a recent report from Autotrader, you can find this enthusiast’s wet dream on the used market for criminally low prices.

PostHeaderIcon Car for Sale: 1992 Dodge Viper with Just 34 Miles on the Clock

The 1992 Dodge Viper was Chrysler’s way of saying ’we’ve now sold enough Minivans to be able to fund an exciting halo car,’ which the Viper truly was. Devoided of modern creature comforts or safety features, the RT/10 was a Corvette eater. This red example from the first year of production somehow managed to gather just 34 miles on the odometer and could be yours for just under $100,000.

You barely ever see cars like the Viper come out of the doors of a major manufacturer nowadays. The Viper itself was axed in 2017 because Chrysler couldn’t put curtain airbags on it nor was the V-10 monster in demand anymore. With it went the Conner Assembly Plant, and all that’s left now are the hopes that somehow, in the future, the Viper will be revived, although that’s hard to imagine.

PostHeaderIcon Car For Sale: 1993 Callaway C8 Camaro Six-speed with Only 1,135 Miles on the Clock

Callaway is a long-time tuner of GM products although it focuses on Chevy cars, trucks and SUVs. The fourth-generation Camaro didn’t escape the clutches of Callaway, though, and this car is the prototype that toured all major auto shows in the mid-’90s and was on the cover of Motor Trend in 1994. It boasts a 404 horsepower, 6.3-liter, V-8.

The F-Body Camaro that debuted in 1992 was seen by Reeves Callaway’s company as a “lower cost platform than the Corvette with a larger market.” As such, the American tuner and manufacturer debuted their own high-performance version in 1993. The ’SuperNatural Camaro’ kit was available with a variety of options in terms of both the body and performance-enhancing parts. The Camaros sent new from Chevy to Callaway built to the top specification right at their shop were known as C8s. Callaway also offered the ’SuperNatural’ kit for the C4 Corvette and, in the same vein, the Corvette delivered brand-new to Callaway and equipped with these mods are known as Callaway Corvette C6s.

PostHeaderIcon Shady Toyota Dealership Buys that Mint-Condition 1994 Supra; Relists it at $500,000

The launch of the fifth-generation Supra is feeding into the hype of the previous generation Supra too, apparently. A 1994 example of the fourth generation recently sold on Bring A Trailer for a ludicrous $121,000 and then quickly emerged on the website of Chicago Northside Toyota with a senseless price tag of $500,000.

The new GR Supra seems to help the old Porsche-beating Supra gain momentum even more than before in terms of the sums of money people ask for pristine examples. With only 7,000 miles on the odometer, this particular red model sold on January 3rd on Bring A Trailer and, the other day, the guys at Carscoops noticed the same car for sale at a Chicago Toyota dealer for half a million bucks or $7,902 per month for 60 months. Since then, the said dealer has taken down the downright insulting listing from its website but it still beggars belief that someone thought this would be a sensible thing to do

PostHeaderIcon Here’s a 1985 Dodge RamCharger Prospector That’ll Make You Forget Your Itch for an Old-School Land Cruiser or Bronco

A 1985 Dodge RamCharger Prospector is available at Barrett Jackson’s auction in Scottsdale, Arizona this weekend. Regarded as perhaps the best-kept secret in the world of vintage trucks and SUVs, the RamCharger Prospector’s status is expected to blow up as prices for old Broncos, Land Cruisers, and Wagoneers become unattainable. Fortunately, the RamCharger Prospector can be still had at affordable prices, including this fine 1985 model that only has 7,563 original miles under its belt. There’s no reserve price attached to this particular piece, so it’s going to be sold to the highest bidder regardless of the final price. If you can score this burgeoning collector’s item, you could be ahead of the game in the quest for 1985 RamCharger Prospectors that are still, at the very least, in good running condition.

PostHeaderIcon A 1994 Toyota Supra With 7k Miles Sold for Crazy Money

A 1994 Toyota Supra has just been sold for $121,000. Yup, you read that right. This number is kind of hurting my intelligence. $121,000 for a 1994 Toyota Supra? I mean, really?

True, the model sold through Bring a Trailer listing is nearly perfect. It is red, manual, twin-turbocharged, and it covered only 7,111 miles. But, $121,000 for a 1994 Toyota? Well, with the impending debut of the all-new Toyota Supra GR A90 in a week or so, the world obviously went berserk about the best Supra that ever was. The thing is that this particular version was really well cared for. And, it is one of the top of the line models from the age when it was produced.

PostHeaderIcon A 1994 Toyota Supra With 7k Miles Sold for Crazy Money

A 1994 Toyota Supra has just been sold for $121,000. Yup, you read that right. This number is kind of hurting my intelligence. $121,000 for a 1994 Toyota Supra? I mean, really?

True, the model sold through Bring a Trailer listing is nearly perfect. It is red, manual, twin-turbocharged, and it covered only 7,111 miles. But, $121,000 for a 1994 Toyota? Well, with the impending debut of the all-new Toyota Supra GR A90 in a week or so, the world obviously went berserk about the best Supra that ever was. The thing is that this particular version was really well cared for. And, it is one of the top of the line models from the age when it was produced.

PostHeaderIcon The Only Road-Legal Porsche 935 Is Up For Sale!

Porsche’s 935 race car was built to compete in the Group 5 class that was the pinnacle of GT racing in the late ’70s and very early ’80s. The
935 was the car to beat in Europe and across the Atlantic in the U.S. and even won Le Mans overall. Such accolades pushed F1 team owner Walter Wolf to want one, but not for the race track. The result was maybe the fastest road-legal car in the world at the time.

When you think about a GT racing car, you envision a car that’s based on a production model that was heavily modified, stripped of any useless equipment that only added weight, and then sent out on the track to compete against other vehicles like it. What’s unusual is to want for one of those race-prepped machines to be made street-legal again, while keeping most if not all of the racing bits on. That was the premise, largely speaking, of the insane GT1 class that lived a short life in the late ’90s but, even before that, there was one car that followed that same path: Walter Wolf’s street-going 935 K3 built by Kremer Racing of Germany.

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