Archive for the ‘Ford Mustang’ Category

PostHeaderIcon Ford Mustang R-Spec

Once you see it, you can’t quite unsee it and for all the good reasons. This is the Ford Mustang R-Spec, a GT-based limited-edition variant built in RHD only for the Australian market that features a plethora of Ford Performance parts, a Roush supercharger, and an active exhaust. That makes it the first supercharged Mustang to be sold through Ford dealers.
With all the goodies that have been crammed in the R-Spec, power goes all the way up to 700 horsepower and 610 pound-feet of torque or about 170 horsepower and 180 torques over the Mustang Shelby GT350. At $67,500 in Oz, this could just be a great bang for the buck if you can get your hands on one of the 500 examples that will be made.

It’s been five years since Australian Blue Oval fans have been mourning the loss of Ford Performance Vehicles (FPV), Ford Australia’s division that used to turn around the really quick Fords at the antipodes. While nothing can replace a Falcon with all of FPV’s go-fast features added to it, the R-Spec Mustang is a nice addition to the sports car’s lineup in Australia where, until now, all you had to choose from when it came to ’special’ Mustangs was the Bullitt – and only 700 of those have been made for the 2019 MY (the R-Spec is part of the 2020 MY Mustang lineup).

PostHeaderIcon Ford Mustang R-Spec

Once you see it, you can’t quite unsee it and for all the good reasons. This is the Ford Mustang R-Spec, a GT-based limited-edition variant built in RHD only for the Australian market that features a plethora of Ford Performance parts, a Roush supercharger, and an active exhaust. That makes it the first supercharged Mustang to be sold through Ford dealers.
With all the goodies that have been crammed in the R-Spec, power goes all the way up to 700 horsepower and 610 pound-feet of torque or about 170 horsepower and 180 torques over the Mustang Shelby GT350. At $67,500 in Oz, this could just be a great bang for the buck if you can get your hands on one of the 500 examples that will be made.

It’s been five years since Australian Blue Oval fans have been mourning the loss of Ford Performance Vehicles (FPV), Ford Australia’s division that used to turn around the really quick Fords at the antipodes. While nothing can replace a Falcon with all of FPV’s go-fast features added to it, the R-Spec Mustang is a nice addition to the sports car’s lineup in Australia where, until now, all you had to choose from when it came to ’special’ Mustangs was the Bullitt – and only 700 of those have been made for the 2019 MY (the R-Spec is part of the 2020 MY Mustang lineup).

PostHeaderIcon Ford Mustang by Austin Cindric and Tucci Hot Rods

This year’s SEMA Auto Show is expected to host some of the finest aftermarket vehicles of the year. That’s the typical run of the order when it comes to the world’s biggest tuner show. The Ford Mustang will undoubtedly be well-represented in the event, as is the case pretty much every year. This time, though, three custom-built, one-off Mustangs will be at SEMA, including this dandy of a build from Team Penske race car driver Austin Cindric and aftermarket tuner extraordinaire Tucci Hot Rods.

Together, the two parties worked to create what is arguably one of the most impressive Mustang builds we’ve seen in a while. It comes with important aesthetic and aerodynamic upgrades, some of which were created through non-traditional means. This Mustang also has an identity that it can call its own, thanks to several personal touches that were included to celebrate Cindric’s family roots in motor racing. Best of all, this Mustang packs the meanest engine upgrade program among the three one-off Mustangs. It’s the most powerful of the lot, and that says something considering that the other Mustangs that are included in MoneyLion’s “HEAR WE ROAR” sweepstakes are both packing 700 horsepower on their own. This one beats both, and it is awesome.

PostHeaderIcon Ford Mustang by Joey Logano and Vaughn Gittin Jr.

The 2019 SEMA Auto Show is going to be so full with custom-built creations that it’s going to be hard to stand out unless you have jet boosters in tow. But for this particular Ford Mustang GT, standing out shouldn’t be a problem. It was created specifically for that purpose by two men — 2018 Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series (MENCS) Champion Joey Logano and World Champion Drifter and founder of RTR Motorsports, Vaughn Gittin Jr.
— who know a thing or two about custom-built performance cars.

This one-off Mustang is officially called the Ford RTR Mustang, and it’s one of the three Mustangs that are featured in mobile bank MoneyLion’s “HERE WE ROAR” sweepstakes. Beyond its exclusivity — it’s a one-off model — the RTR Mustang fits the bill of perfect SEMA showpiece. It’s heavily dressed in aftermarket goodies and it boasts a completely upgraded performance setup, highlighted by an engine upgrade program that unleashes a new level of power and performance from Ford’s iconic muscle car. The 2019 RTR Mustang is meant to attend the 2019 SEMA Auto Show. Fortunately, that’s exactly where we’re going to see it before it finds a lucky new owner by way of MoneyLion’s sweepstakes.

PostHeaderIcon Ford Mustang by Ryan Blaney and David Chen

The Ford Mustang is a fixture at the SEMA Auto Show, and this year will be no different. Fresh from the aftermarket oven comes this current-generation Ford Mustang GT. It comes by way of mobile bank MoneyLion’s “HERE WE ROAR” sweepstakes and it’s one of three custom-tuned Mustangs that can be won through the competition.

This particular Mustang was created by Team Penske NASCAR Cup Series driver Ryan Blaney and world-renowned automotive photographer Larry Chen. Both received help from some of the best tuners in the country, and the result is a 700-horsepower performance machine that can set drag strips and race tracks on fire.

PostHeaderIcon Ford is Kicking Chevy’s Ass With the Mustang Too

Ford hasn’t launched theHigh-Performance Package for the 2.3-liter EcoBoost Mustang quite yet, but it launches Fall of 2019, so we’re not too far off. We’ve talked a lot about it, but to our knowledge, nobody had seen it so far. That was until MSN Autos apparently managed to get behind the wheel of one and they say that it gives the base, four-cylinder Chevy Camaro a hardcore beatdown – even worse than it did before. So, how bad does the EcoBoost Mustang Performance Package put a hurting on the Chevy Camaro?

PostHeaderIcon Ford Mustang GT vs. Toyota Supra vs. BMW Z4 – Who Wins?

Carmakers like to pound their chests with Nurburgring lap times when it comes to how fast their cars are, while automotive journos tend to take those cars and measure them against each other in perhaps the most telling form of competition: the good ‘ol drag race.

Naturally, such a staged drag race isn’t always about gas-guzzling muscle cars or heavily-modded vehicles that put out in excess of 1,000 horsepower. We’ve seen econoboxes taking forever to complete the quarter-mile all in the name of fun, so when someone pits the Ford Mustang GT Fastback against the new Toyota Supra and BMW Z4, all we can do is watch and enjoy.

PostHeaderIcon Here’s What You Need to Know About Choosing the Color of Your 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500

We can’t not like the Blue colors that adorned the Shelby GT500 that was showcased during the car’s big debut. It was a beautiful color, and it fit the car pretty damn well. Of course, it looked even better because of the color of carpet it was displayed on, but that’s neither here nor there. What if you don’t want blue? Maybe you want pull-me-over-red (not that’s not a real color) or some variation of blue or purple even? Well, the Shelby GT500 is offered with your choice of 11 different colors, some of which you can have for free, and others you have to pay for. Oh, and about those racing stripes… we’ve got you covered on that too. Here’s what you need to know.

PostHeaderIcon Ford Mustang GT

The Ford Mustang has a rich history that dates all the way back to the 1962 Ford Mustang I two-seater concept. It wasn’t until mid-1964 that it was introduced in production form (just two weeks after Plymouth introduced the first Barracuda) and has been in production ever since, with the sixth-generation model, the model you see here, being introduced in 2015. For one reason or another, we haven’t had a chance to get our hands on a sixth-gen model, but all that has changed now, and we happened to be graced with the 2019 Ford Mustang GT Convertible. With the bright green pony car sitting in our parking lot, we couldn’t wait to drive it. And, despite the fact that we had a whole week to get acquainted, we got right to putting the GT Convertible, and its 5.0-liter V-8 to the test.

Does it compete well with the Chevy Camaro Convertible? What about, on the other end of the spectrum, the BMW 4 Series Cabriolet? Well, this is our experience and what we thought about it. Strap in folks, this is going to be one long ride.

PostHeaderIcon Ever Wonder Why the Racing Stripe on a 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Costs $10,000?

The 2020 Ford Shelby GT 500 starts out at $72,900 or about $1,300 a month if you have amazing credit – that’s some $12,460 more expensive than the base GT350 and $535 cheaper than the GT350R. Does it blow your mind to know that the GT500 can be customized to the extent that it will set you back $107,080? Just how the hell do you add $34,100 worth of options to a freaking Mustang – especially the, arguably, best Mustang you can buy? Well, as I was customizing mine, I noticed something – the GT500 has a $10,000 racing stripe option, one that is now available next to the usual $1,000 vinal stripe. How does Ford justify charging $10,000 for a racing stripe that, regardless of what you think, doesn’t make you go faster? Well, here’s the deal….

PostHeaderIcon Car for Sale: 1985 ASC McLaren 5.0SC Convertible

Ford moved the Mustang to the then-new Fox platform for the 1979 model year and, at the same time, Mercury introduced the second-generation Capri as a Mustang with a posh interior that was more expensive but, mechanically, almost identical. The cream of the crop were the Capris modified by ASC and McLaren between 1984 and 1986 and, with only 933 Capris ever updated to ASC/McLaren specification, they are particularly rare and hard to find. This one you see here was offered on Craigslist and is said to be one of just 257 units converted in 1985 and one of just 94 originally painted in Oxford White that year.

In the ’70s, if you wanted to try out Ford Cologne’s attempt at building a Mustang for the European market but you didn’t live in Europe, you got yourself a Mercury Capri. As a $2,300 (in 1970) economical sports coupe, the original Capri was what’s known as a ’captive import’ – a car made outside of the U.S. borders but sold Stateside under a different badge while not carrying any divisional identification. In ’72, the Mercury Capri became the first car sold by a Ford-owned brand in the U.S. to feature a V-6 as Mercury introduced a version powered by the 2.6-liter Cologne V-6 engine. In 1976, Mercury followed in the footsteps of the Europeans and started selling the Mark II Capri but the drivetrain remained common with the Ford Pinto, Ford Mustang II, and Mercury Bobcat. The ties between the Capri and the Mustang became closer three years later when the Capri returned on the market as a sports car based on the Fox platform. This is where the story of this car begins in earnest.

PostHeaderIcon Want a Real Ford Boss 302FRS Race Car? Well, You Can Have It If You’re Quick Enough and Have $45K

It’s one thing to buy a 2020 Ford Mustang for around $37,000; it’s another thing entirely to add somewhere in the vicinity of $8,000 to $10,000 to buy aFord Mustang Boss 302 from the Ford Performance Racing School. Given a choice, which one would you go for? Yes, the Ford Performance Racing School is selling 14 of its heavily modified Mustang Boss 302FRS race cars for just $45,000. That’s the good news. No, it’s great news. The bad news is that you just can’t call the school and tell them that you’re interested in one of the 14 Boss 302FRS racers. You need to have attended one of the school’s programs to be eligible to buy these race cars. If you do belong to this exclusive list, you can buy one of the 14, provided there’s any left. Should you get the nod, the race cars will be available for pick up by October 20, 2019, and you’re going to be responsible for picking the car up, possibly at the Ford Performance Racing School in Grantsville, Utah.

PostHeaderIcon Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 by Hennessey

The 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 is the kind of car you buy if you’re into power, speed, and performance. It’s also the kind of car you buy if you’re not afraid of what all of that can do to you. Oh, and it’s also the car you buy if you want to get any of these tuning programs that are available specifically for the 2020 Mustang Shelby GT500. There are three tuning programs in total: Venom 850, Venom 1000, and Venom 1200. Each one offers power and performance upgrades to the Shelby GT500’s 5.2-liter supercharged V-8 engine. I suppose the amount of extra power you want depends on what you can handle on the race track. Let it be said, though, that when Hennessey builds a tuning kit for a muscle car that’s already dripping in power and torque, these kits aren’t the types you buy when you want to use them for your weekend errands. These kits are the types you buy when you want to go balls-to-the-wall on the racetrack.

PostHeaderIcon Ford Isn’t Bringing Back the Mustang SVO Nameplate and There’s Actually a Good Reason

Although it existed for only two years, from 1984 until 1986, the SVO nameplate continues to spark emotions among Ford Mustang enthusiasts more than 30 years later. But despite massive interest from gearheads, the Blue Oval doesn’t want to revive the name now that all high-performance Fords are being engineered by the Ford Performance division.

PostHeaderIcon Ford Will Debut Its Mustang-Inspired All-Electric SUV At the 2019 Los Angeles Auto Show

Don’t hold your breath just yet, but it looks like the Mustang-inspired SUV will make its debut at the 2019 Los Angeles Auto Show. Okay, so we’re reaching a little bit, but honestly, it’s not much. According to a report by The Detroit Bureau, a Ford Spokesperson as confirmed that the brand will launch a “sport-utility vehicle that will be heavily influenced by the Mustang’s traditional design” and that the public should get its “first peek at the new SUV in November.”

It doesn’t take much to do the math on this one. The Ford Mach-E, as the Mustang-based electric SUV is expected to be called, has been in the works for a while now. We’ve seen the teaser, heard the rumors, and now we have a spokesperson (unnamed as of the time of this writing) claiming that we’ll get a peak in November. Sure, this could mean that the company is going to quietly release another teaser video or a few images, but the Los Angeles Auto Show is also in November, and the company isn’t going to miss the opportunity to get vital public feedback on a concept or near-production-ready concept.

In fact, the brand really needs to hear public feedback. It almost made the mistake of calling this Electric SUV the Mach 1, and there were damn near riots in the streets. Since then, the company as pedaled back and filed a new patent for “Mach-E,” but that name hasn’t been officially confirmed. If the company did a better job at designing this electric, Mustang-based EV then maybe we’ll see it soon enough, but if the company makes the wrong move again – much as it did with the Mach 1 name – then the company could be forced to regroup its plans for the SUV once again.

PostHeaderIcon The Average Age of Muscle Car Buyers Is Over 50 – What It Means for the Challenger, Mustang, and Camaro?

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You would think that people who buy muscle cars these days are young buyers who are looking to make a name for themselves with affordable performance cars that they can proudly show off on their social media pages. You’d be wrong. The median age for buyers of, say, Dodge Challengers is 51 years old. 51 years old. That age hardly counts in the millennial age bracket, but that’s not even the most surprising part pertaining muscle car buyers these days. What’s most surprising is the median Challenger buyer is the youngest in the muscle car segment, specifically among the three established American ponies. Is this a trend worth paying attention to, and if so, how does this revelation contribute to the future of the muscle car segment?

PostHeaderIcon Here’s How the 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 Can Go from 0-100 mph and back to 0 in 10.6 Seconds

First unveiled at the 2019 Detroit Auto Show, the Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 didn’t reveal itself to us in full straight away. We had to wait until June to find out the exact output of the supercharged, 5.2-liter V-8 and then we found out how much it will cost. However, some pieces of the puzzle were still missing. Now, Ford revealed another metric: the 0-100-0 time of the GT500. As you already read the title, you’ll know the most powerful road-going product of the Blue Oval does it in under 11 seconds and this places the monstrous muscle car in a rather exclusive club as you’ll find out below – yet behind what Dodge and Chevy can do.

When Ford conceived the latest Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 that’ll go on sale starting from $70,300 (without taxes) as a 2020 MY car, it pulled no punches in an effort to squash the Dodge Challenger Hellcat and the Chevy Camaro ZL1. Yes, it’s not as powerful as the 797 horsepower Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye but it’s got 110 ponies on the Camaro ZL1 and 30 horsepower on Ferrari’s F12 grand tourer that costs $320,000 when new. But the Mustang GT500 isn’t all about raw speed as it can also accelerate, stop, and corner incredibly well – if you couldn’t already tell by that GT4-style wing fixed to the tail end.

PostHeaderIcon 2020 Ford Mustang Shleby GT500 vs 2019 Aston Martin DBS Superleggera

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The Shelby GT500 returned in 2019 after a five-year hiatus as the most powerful street-legal Ford, even when compared to the GT supercar. Now more track-ready than ever, the GT500 also borrows technology from the Mustang GT4 race car in order to compete with the Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat (or even the Demon?) and the Chevrolet Camaro ZL1. But is this 760-horsepower muscle car good enough to compete with higher-performance vehicles, like the Aston Martin DBS Superleggera? Let’s find out in the comparison below.

PostHeaderIcon Ford Mustang EV by Charge Cars

Electrifying older cars is an area with huge potential because the vehicles that result from such conversions have classic style and modern performance, all with zero tailpipe emissions. That’s why projects like this 1967 Ford Mustang that’s been modified by Charge Cars in the UK is so intriguing because it not only (still) looks the part, but it’s also blisteringly fast and packed with cool tech too.

PostHeaderIcon Ford Mustang EV by Charge Cars

Electrifying older cars is an area with huge potential because the vehicles that result from such conversions have classic style and modern performance, all with zero tailpipe emissions. That’s why projects like this 1967 Ford Mustang that’s been modified by Charge Cars in the UK is so intriguing because it not only (still) looks the part, but it’s also blisteringly fast and packed with cool tech too.

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