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Archive for the ‘Honda Civic’ Category

PostHeaderIcon Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019

The Honda Urban EV Concept was one of the most pleasant surprises of 2017. It made its debut at the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show, and in the months since, Honda has apparently decided that it was promising enough that the Japanese automaker has decided to approve a production version. In fact, order books for the production version of the model are scheduled to open from early 2019, setting the stage for the Urban EV Concept to become Honda’s first mass-produced battery electric vehicle to hit the market in Europe.


Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019 - image 731195
“The open order books for the production model will open sometime in the early part of 2019.”

We admit that there was a mixed reaction here at TopSpeed when the Honda Urban EV Concept was unveiled. But, that’s all water under the bridge, and clearly, Honda didn’t think too much of it. What it did care about was gauging the interest people had of the concept. It turns out that enough people thought highly of the Urban EV Concept’s potential that the Japanese automaker just issued a press release announcing that it’s going to open order books for the production model beginning in the early part of 2019.

Honda Motor Europe Senior Vice President Philip Ross confirmed as much in the press release. “A production version of this highly acclaimed concept will be introduced to Europe during late 2019, and in response to the positive feedback to this model, we expect to open order banks for the Urban EV during early 2019,” he said.


Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019 - image 731732
“We don’t think that it’s going to completely use the concept’s design on the production model.”

So what does a production version of the Honda Urban EV Concept mean for Honda and the whole segment? It’s unclear how the Japanese automaker plans to tackle the design element of the car, but we don’t think that it’s going to completely use the concept’s design on the production model. Remember, the Urban EV Concept’s design was inspired by the first-generation Honda Civic. It appealed to some people while others didn’t think too highly of it when it was unveiled in Paris. Expect some mainstream changes in the production version’s design to make it more appealing to more people.


Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019 - image 731196
“Fortunately, we shouldn’t expect those two bench seats, either.”

On the tech front, the concept previewed some interesting goodies to look out for. One of the most distinctive features of the Urban EV Concept was the wrap-around screen that extended into the doors. While it would be interesting to see that kind of setup on the production model, it’s unlikely that Honda’s going to invest in it considering where the model’s place is going to be relative to the automaker’s portfolio. Fortunately, we shouldn’t expect those two bench seats, either. That’d just be a crime against our backs.


Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019 - image 731737
“Rest assured, don’t expect it to carry a gas engine of any sort. It’s going to be an electric car, that much we’re all sure of.”

Interestingly enough, Honda actually didn’t reveal information about the concept’s powertrain when the model was unveiled in Frankfurt. This gives Honda the advantage of testing out what kind of powertrain would work best on the production model. Rest assured, don’t expect it to carry a gas engine of any sort. It’s going to be an electric car, that much we’re all sure of.

Regardless, the Nissan Leafs and Volkswagen e-Golfs of the world better start paying attention to what Honda’s plans for the Urban EV are.

References

Honda Urban EV Concept


Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019 - image 731194

Read up what we had to say in our review of the Honda Urban EV Concept

Honda Sports EV concept


2017 Honda Sports EV Concept - image 740626

Check out what will likely be Honda’s second EV, the Honda Sports EV Concept

Honda


maker logos - image 742500

Read up on the latest Honda News

PostHeaderIcon Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019

The Honda Urban EV Concept was one of the most pleasant surprises of 2017. It made its debut at the 2017 Frankfurt Motor Show, and in the months since, Honda has apparently decided that it was promising enough that the Japanese automaker has decided to approve a production version. In fact, order books for the production version of the model are scheduled to open from early 2019, setting the stage for the Urban EV Concept to become Honda’s first mass-produced battery electric vehicle to hit the market in Europe.


Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019 - image 731195
“The open order books for the production model will open sometime in the early part of 2019.”

We admit that there was a mixed reaction here at TopSpeed when the Honda Urban EV Concept was unveiled. But, that’s all water under the bridge, and clearly, Honda didn’t think too much of it. What it did care about was gauging the interest people had of the concept. It turns out that enough people thought highly of the Urban EV Concept’s potential that the Japanese automaker just issued a press release announcing that it’s going to open order books for the production model beginning in the early part of 2019.

Honda Motor Europe Senior Vice President Philip Ross confirmed as much in the press release. “A production version of this highly acclaimed concept will be introduced to Europe during late 2019, and in response to the positive feedback to this model, we expect to open order banks for the Urban EV during early 2019,” he said.


Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019 - image 731732
“We don’t think that it’s going to completely use the concept’s design on the production model.”

So what does a production version of the Honda Urban EV Concept mean for Honda and the whole segment? It’s unclear how the Japanese automaker plans to tackle the design element of the car, but we don’t think that it’s going to completely use the concept’s design on the production model. Remember, the Urban EV Concept’s design was inspired by the first-generation Honda Civic. It appealed to some people while others didn’t think too highly of it when it was unveiled in Paris. Expect some mainstream changes in the production version’s design to make it more appealing to more people.


Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019 - image 731196
“Fortunately, we shouldn’t expect those two bench seats, either.”

On the tech front, the concept previewed some interesting goodies to look out for. One of the most distinctive features of the Urban EV Concept was the wrap-around screen that extended into the doors. While it would be interesting to see that kind of setup on the production model, it’s unlikely that Honda’s going to invest in it considering where the model’s place is going to be relative to the automaker’s portfolio. Fortunately, we shouldn’t expect those two bench seats, either. That’d just be a crime against our backs.


Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019 - image 731737
“Rest assured, don’t expect it to carry a gas engine of any sort. It’s going to be an electric car, that much we’re all sure of.”

Interestingly enough, Honda actually didn’t reveal information about the concept’s powertrain when the model was unveiled in Frankfurt. This gives Honda the advantage of testing out what kind of powertrain would work best on the production model. Rest assured, don’t expect it to carry a gas engine of any sort. It’s going to be an electric car, that much we’re all sure of.

Regardless, the Nissan Leafs and Volkswagen e-Golfs of the world better start paying attention to what Honda’s plans for the Urban EV are.

References

Honda Urban EV Concept


Honda Will Make the Nissan Leaf and VW E-Golf Obsolete When the Urban EV Goes on Sale in 2019 - image 731194

Read up what we had to say in our review of the Honda Urban EV Concept

Honda Sports EV concept


2017 Honda Sports EV Concept - image 740626

Check out what will likely be Honda’s second EV, the Honda Sports EV Concept

Honda


maker logos - image 742500

Read up on the latest Honda News

PostHeaderIcon Honda Civic Type R – Driven (Again)

The Honda Civic Type R has quite a legacy to its name, though none of it happened on American soil. Thankfully, that’s changed for 2017 as Honda has finally brought the Type R Stateside. In fact, its turbocharged engine is made in Ohio before being shipped to Wiltshire, England for assembly in the car. That’s right, this Japanese hot hatch has an American heart and is born in Britain. How’s that for multi-cultural? But more than that, the Type R’s appearance on U.S. soil means we finally have the chance to compare it to its fiercest rivals – the Ford Focus RS, Subaru WRX STI, and Volkswagen Golf R.

As it turns out, I’ve driven each of the competitors. Each are immensely fun and worthy of loads of respect over their engineering and outright impressive performance. The Type R joins those ranks with the same impressive level of technical wizardry and high-tech manufacturing techniques. I’ll dive into some of that, along with comparing it to the RS, Subi, and Golf R. It will be a fun ride, so read along.

Continue reading for more on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


Exterior

  • Unique bodywork creates downforce
  • 20-inch lightweight alloy wheels
  • Sticky 245/30R Continental SportContact 6 tires

2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754482
“The Type R spent many hours in wind tunnel testing during its development and everything (mostly) serves a purpose.”

The Civic Type R is definitely a hot hatch by appearance. Honda has attached things like a chin splitter, hood scoop, rocker extensions, wider fenders, and that massive rear wing. Oh, and that’s in addition to the regular spoiler and large faux air intakes that carries over from the regular Civic Hatchback. Needless to say, the Type R is aggressive. Thankfully, the car’s bite matches its bark and the styling isn’t just for looks.

The Type R spent many hours in wind tunnel testing during its development. Everything (mostly) serves a purpose. The grille is separated into three sections; the large lower portion directs air to the turbochargers’ intercooler, the slot below the Honda logo directs air to the radiator, and the slot above the logo feeds the engine a cool blast of fresh air. There’s also the hood scoop. No, it doesn’t have some cool ram-air effect, but rather sends air behind the transversely mounted engine to both keep temperatures in check and to relieve air pressure under the hood.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754488
“The Type R is not a top-speed machine gunning for 150+ mph records, but every little bit of traction is welcomed when blasting down a racetrack.”

Other aero bits like the chin splitter and fins below the fog lights help generate downforce, while small vortex generators on the roof help direct air over the tall wing. The Type R is not a top-speed machine gunning for 150+ mph records, but every little bit of traction is welcomed when blasting down a racetrack.

Part of the Type R’s prodigious handling prowess comes from its wheel and tire combination. It rolls on lightweight 20-inch alloy wheels wrapped in 245/30R Continental SportContact 6 summer performance tires. For those not experts in tire sizes, 30-series sidewalls are about as tall as a pancake. It offers very little deflection and give – a necessity for that riding-on-rails feeling the Type R exhibits. The downside is, well, very little deflection and give. That makes the ride rather harsh on rough, broken pavement. It also makes those thin-spoked wheels a prime target for potholes. Still, the tradeoff is worth it; the Type R is a handling monster. But more on that later. As for looks, the wheel and tire combination is fantastic. I really appreciate the red ring the rim’s outer edge and how it matches the red accent running along the faux carbon fiber body kit.

Interior

  • Honda-developed front bucket seats
  • Red accents throughout
  • Suede stitching for contrast
  • 7.0-inch Infotainment system
  • Apple CarPlay & Android Auto
  • Seating for four life-sized adults
  • 25.7/46.2 cubic feet of cargo room

2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754508
“Compared to its rivals, the Type R takes second only to the Volkswagen Golf R.”

Honda engineers, designers, and bean counters had to devise an interior that added that something special while maintaining as many parts from the standard Civic as possible. In my view, they accomplished this compromise rather well. The Type R gets unique, Honda-built racing buckets up front, some faux carbon fiber accenting, a unique steering wheel, yards of suede and contrast stitching, and of course, splashes of red everywhere.

Not only are the seats red, but the steering wheel is accented in red, the dash has red hues, the seatbelts are red – heck, even the shift pattern engraved into the stainless steel knob is red. It goes a long way in adding that sporty feel to a cabin that is otherwise found in your sister’s Civic Touring. Don’t get me wrong; the Civic-y parts of the Type R are still relatively high quality and in no way detract from the Type R experience. In fact, I rather like the Type R’s interior. Compared to its rivals, the Type R takes second only to the Volkswagen Golf R – a car that’s known for its impressive Audi-like fineness and tasteful design. On the other hand, the Subaru’s interior feels dated while the Ford’s feels made from oily yet scratchy plastic found on public transportation.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754535
“There is 25.7 cubic feet of cargo room behind the rear seats and an impressive 46.2 cubic feet with them folded”

The other handy carry0ver from the standard Civic Hatchback is its cargo volume. There is 25.7 cubic feet of cargo room behind the rear seats and an impressive 46.2 cubic feet with them folded. That outdoes the Focus RS and Golf R with the seats in place, though the Golf R offers 52.7 cubic feet with its seats folded. The Civic also has a sliding shade hides cargo from prying eyes and glaring sunbeams. Since the Type R spent Christmas at my house, it spent time hauling presents back and forth to the in-law’s house. Aside from the massive rolling toolbox Santa brought my way, the Type R transported everything just fine.

Honda’s infotainment system offers plenty of functionality, too. It comes with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, along with satellite radio and GPS navigation. These come standard, of course, being that the Type R is a mon0-spec car based on the nicely equipped Civic Touring trim. Sadly, Honda left out the Civic Touring’s standard Honda Sensing safety suite and power-adjustable front seats in order to save on weight. While I’m ecstatic about the 3,100-pound curb weight, the absence of blind spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic detection, and other features is a bit disappointing. Then again, the large side mirrors and surprisingly open rear visibility meant never really needing the driving aids.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754517
“Unfortunately, the Civic’s 7.0-inch infotainment system hasn’t received that update”

Other features I miss is lumbar adjustment on the front seats and a knob for the radio volume. The Honda-developed racing buckets are great, but added adjustability would be welcomed. The missing knob has already been addressed in other Honda products since most everybody complained about the touch-sensitive slider. Unfortunately, the Civic’s 7.0-inch infotainment system hasn’t received that update. Redundant steering wheel controls help alleviate the issue.

It’s also worth pointing out I never had connection issue with the satellite radio during my week-long evaluation. That wasn’t the case during the Type R launch event in western Washington State. Apparently the mountainous terrain played havoc with the radio and GPS. Here in Central Florida where the tallest objects are pine trees, music flowed freely from the 540-watt sound system’s 12 speakers.

And speaking of speakers, the system includes all the standard connectivity methods. There is Bluetooth, along with a USB port hidden in a lower level below the center stack near the footwell. A pass-through with cord snaps allows for excellent management of cables, too. A second USB port is hidden deep below the cup holders in the center console.

Drivetrain

  • 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder
  • 306 horsepower at 6,500 rpm
  • 295 pound-feet of torque from 2,500 to 4,500 rpm
  • Six-speed manual transmission
  • Front-wheel drive
  • Limited-slip differentials
  • 5.4 seconds to 60 mph
  • 22 mpg city / 28 mpg hwy / 25 mpg comb

2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754504
“A high-tech, all-aluminum 2.0-liter four-cylinder with a turbocharger capable of producing 23.2 pounds of boost”

Behind that aggressive front bodywork is high-tech, all-aluminum 2.0-liter four-cylinder with a turbocharger capable of producing 23.2 pounds of boost. That’s impressive, especially for an automaker relatively new to the turbocharger game. What isn’t new is Honda’s legendary VTEC system. This valvetrain design modulates the phasing on its dual overhead camshafts to change the amount of valve lift and duration seamlessly through the rev range. The result is a torque-rich lower register and a powerful upper range. The numbers don’t lie: it makes 306 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 295 pound-feet of torque from 2,500 to 4,500 rpm.

The engine also features direct fuel injection for precise management of fuel flow into each cylinder. A lightweight crankshaft, connecting rods, and pistons, along with sodium-filled exhaust valve stems, contribute to the engine’s quick-revving nature. Blip the throttle and the tach shoots from idle to its 7,000-rpm redline in a blink.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754503
“The numbers don’t lie: it makes 306 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 295 pound-feet of torque from 2,500 to 4,500 rpm.”

The engine dumps its exhaust into a single pipe that runs though the transmission tunnel past the rear subframe. Once there, the pipe splits into three sections. The outer pipes feed mufflers while the center pipe feeds a resonator. That’s why there are three exhaust tips on the Type R. At higher revs, the outer mufflers handle the exhaust, while the center resonator is designed for low to mid-level revs. The resonator helps reduce the booming noises typically heard from inside the cabin of a four-cylinder car.

The Type R comes standard with one transmission: a six-speed manual. To the delight and enjoyment of enthusiasts and owners everywhere, the gearbox is super sweet to operate with short throws and snickety engagements into each notch. The clutch is a joy, too, with a light action and a predictable engagement point. It makes driving the Type R around town completely trouble-free. Combine that with the automatic rev matching, and the Type R’s gearbox ranks very high in the halls of legendary manual transmissions.

Unlike its competition, power to sent only to the Type R’s front wheels. While that might seem like a cheap cop-out on Honda’s part, the Type R’s light curb weight and nimble handling prove Honda engineers made a conscious decision to keep the Type R’s legacy of front-wheel drive. Honda does stack its deck by using a limited-slip differential.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754499
“Also a key player in putting power to the ground is the Type R’s dual-axis front suspension”

Also a key player in putting power to the ground is the Type R’s dual-axis front suspension. Basically, the steering knuckle is mounted further away from the MacPherson strut with its upper and lower ball joints creating a parallel line with the strut. By either physics or black magic, this reduces torque steer, making the car easier to handle without white-knuckling the steering wheel.

Performance wise, the Type R does lag slightly behind the Focus RS and WRX STI in straight-line runs. The Focus RS hits 60 mph in 4.7 seconds and the Subi does it quicker at 4.6 seconds. The Type R needs roughly 5.4 seconds. There are reports of some folks pulling off a 4.9-second run, however.

When not being driven like it’s stolen, the Type R returns relatively decent fuel economy. The EPA estimates it will achieve 22 mpg city, 28 mpg highway, and 25 mpg combined. During my week of evaluation, I averaged right at 23.1 mpg combined over roughly 300 miles of very mixed driving without trying for good economy. I have no doubt the Civic Type R is capable of hitting 25 mpg combined when driven respectably.

Drivetrain Specifications

Engine 2.0-liter Turbocharged Four-Cylinder
Horsepower 306 @ 6,500 rpm
Torque 295 pound-feet @ 2,500 – 4,500 rpm
Max RPM 7,000
Valvetrain DOHC; i-VTEC
Compression Ratio 9.8:1
Max Boost 23.2 PSI
Fuel System Direct injection; Premium Unleaded
Fuel Economy 22 city / 28 hwy / 25 comb

Behind the Wheel


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754506
“The Type R has three drive modes that drastically alter its behavior.”

Few cars I’ve driven exhibit the same kind of tossability and power as the Type R. It’s like driving a Mazda MX-5 Miata with an extra 151 horsepower and 245-series summer performance tires. The Type R has three drive modes that drastically alter its behavior. Comfort mode softens the adaptive dampers, dulls the throttle response, and eases the steering effort for a somewhat relaxed driving experience. Sport mode, the default mode upon start-up, heightens all three parameters. This makes the Civic Type R feel poised and capable of taking on twisty roads without being too high-strung for its own good.

For the racetrack, there’s +R mode. It dials the dampers, throttle, and steering to 11, making the Type R feel invincible. No, it doesn’t somehow make its 306 horsepower feel like the Focus RS’ 350, but +R mode makes the Honda’s horses run like a scalded dog.

Honda’s heavily bolstered front buckets seats do a magnificent job at holding bottoms in place. Their suede and mesh coverings grip rather well. The steering wheel is also fun to hold, though it’s surprisingly free of extra-thick grips, which is fine by me.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754497
“All told, the Type R is a well-balanced machine that is a terror at the track and a babe on the boulevard”

Also surprising is the view through the back glass. That tall wing does not impede the driver’s sight lines of traffic. Thin pillars and a tall roof also contribute to excellent views of the outside world. And as mentioned, those large side mirrors do a fine job.

All told, the Type R is a well-balanced machine that is a terror at the track and a babe on the boulevard. It is surprisingly capable of doing both, though it’s not without compromise. Those thin sidewalls on the Continental tires and lack of thick sound deadening material inside the cabin contribute to loads of road noise, especially on rough pavement. And despite the center resonator’s best efforts, the exhaust does drone somewhat when the engine is under load at lower revs. Last but not least, Honda decided to bury the HVAC controls within the infotainment screen. You’ve got to press the climate button below the 7.0-inch screen to load the HVAC menu screen. Only here is the vent fan speed and most of the auxiliary functions like defrost and vent location controllable. Thankfully, the dual-zone temperature knobs are within easy reach of the front occupants. The two passengers in the back seat made do with no vents at all.

Pricing


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754490

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R is a mono-spec car, meaning it only comes one way and every one has the same features. The customer’s only choice is the exterior color and what add-on accessories the dealership will install. That means pricing is pretty simple – at least for the most part. Honda is charging $33,900 for the Type R, plus an $875 destination fee, bringing the total price to $34,775.

Unfortunately, Honda dealerships have reportedly been charging exorbitant amounts of mark-up. I’ve heard some dealers adding as much as $20,000 to the price! Thankfully, those instances seem to be isolated and most Type Rs are going for at or slightly above the MSRP.

The Competition

2017 Ford Focus RS


2016 Ford Focus RS – Driven - image 718773

The Ford Focus RS is the current horsepower and whiz-bang tech champ of this hot-hatch group. Its aesthetics are, in my view, a bit more restrained yet still appropriate for a 350-horsepower car. It offers optional Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, which are the current go-to choice for supercars the world over. They are wrapped around lightweight alloy wheels which cover big Brembo brakes. Inside, Ford didn’t really do much to update the interior. The front seats are from Recaro, the steering wheel has a flat bottom and thick grips, and there is an extra gauge pod perched on the dashboard. Beyond that, the RS’s cabin looks like any rental-grade Focus – and that’s too bad.

What the Focus RS lacks in interior swag, it more than makes up for with power. A 2.3-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder generates 350 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 350 pound-feet of torque at only 3,200 rpm. The turbocharged engine mates to a six-speed manual transmission that is then connected to a sophisticated AWD system. The AWD offers a rear-bias that makes the car more fun to toss around. Ford was even crazy enough to install a “drift mode,” which allows the car to fling sidewise like Ken Block himself is at the wheel.

Pricing is a bit steep for the RS. For 2017, Ford is charging $36,120. However, that doesn’t include the sticky Michelin tires, eight-way power driver’s seat, navigation, or several other comfort and convenience features. Check all the option boxes and the price will shoot to $41,550, just like the Focus RS reviewed here.

2018 Subaru WRX STI


2018 Subaru WRX STI – Driven - image 722048

Okay, so the Subaru WRX STi isn’t a hatchback, but it used to be. That legacy still keep this sedan barking up the same tree as the Focus RS, VW Golf R, and the new Civic Type R. And like those others, the WRS STI is based on an everyday car found basically everywhere. In the Subaru’s case, it’s the Impreza. However, there’s a catch. The 2018 Impreza is completely new, having undergone a generational update for the 2017 model year. The WRX STI and its middle-ground brother, the WRX, are sadly based on the previous generation Impreza. Nevertheless, both WRX version received a slight update for 2018, getting a more angular front end, larger wheels fitted over larger brakes, and a few updates to the interior.

Most of the greasy bits are still the same, however. Power comes from a 2.5-liter turbocharged Boxer four-cylinder making 305 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 290 pound-feet of torque at 4,000 rpm. A six-speed manual is the only gearbox. Subaru swapped in a new electrical center differential over the older mechanical one found in previous models. It’s sais to improve smoothness and responsiveness in the AWD drivetrain. It still allows for manual adjustment of the differential’s lock-up.

Pricing for the 2018 Subaru WRX STI starts at $36,095. Subaru does offer different trim levels with the WRX STI. The one seen here is a Limited trim and commands $40,895.

2016 Volkswagen Golf R


2016 Volswagen Golf R - Driven - image 692469

The VW Golf R is definitely the sleeper of the bunch. Its exterior isn’t cladded with big aero bits or low-hanging chin splitters. Rather, the Golf R looks rather mature. That’s certainly welcomed after spending a week with each of the other contenders. Less people point and stare, which for me, is a good thing. Those who like their ego stroked might not feel the same way. Inside, the maturity level continues. Aside from the somewhat extra-bolstered front seats and flat-bottom steering wheel, the Golf R doesn’t screen hot-hatch. Rather, it lets its engine do all the talking.

And talk it will! The Golf R comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder making 292 horsepower at 5,400 rpm and 280 pound-feet of torque at only 1,800 rpm and hold a flat torque curve to 5,500 rpm. While the numbers suggest the Golf R is underpowered, it certainly doesn’t feel that way from behind the wheel. The VW is also the only contender here to offer a dual-clutch automatic transmission. It’s a quick-shifting bugger, but the standard six-speed manual gearbox is the enthusiasts choice.

Pricing for the 2016 Golf R I last reviewed started at $35,650, but carried an as-tested price of $39,375 thanks to options like the $820 DSG gearbox.

Conclusion


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754483

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R was clearly designed to compete against some fantastic hardware without copying their recipe. Honda ditched the idea of AWD or having exorbitant levels of horsepower from an overworked engine. Rather, the Type R is a focused, lightweight car with an engine that should hold up well past 150,000 miles. That’s no knock on the Ford, Subaru, or Volkswagen’s reliability, but there is something to be said for Honda’s reputation for trouble-free service.

From behind the wheel, the Type R feels extremely sorted and well built while offering an exhilarating drive that’s more than capable of landing drivers in jail. Its three drive modes allow for a range of attitudes, while its large trunk makes it usable for everyday tasks and grocery store runs.

The Type R could still use some more sound insulation to reduce tire noise, a volume knob for the radio, and physical HVAC controls that aren’t buried in the infotainment system. Still, the Type R is a fantastic daily driver and even better backroad burner. Honda definitely did its homework when developing the car and pricing it below its competitors. As for which one to buy, it boils down to personal preference. All four hot hatches offer outstanding performance and everyday livability, but go about that mission in different ways with different personalities. Take your pick and you won’t be wrong, but the Honda definitely makes a very strong case for itself.

  • Leave it
    • * Styling too aggressvie for some
    • * Needs a more fun exhuast note
    • * Loses all-weather capability had by classmates

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754506

2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754485

Here’s How Honda Manages Air on the 2017 Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754504

The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754489

Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R’s Suspension


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754481

Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver


2017 Honda Civic Type R – Driven - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the Honda Civic Type R.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719346

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Type R.

PostHeaderIcon 2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel

A
Rallye Red 2017 Honda Civic Type R has graced my driveway for the last week. Visible from my office window, the hot hatch just begs to be driven – and driven hard. It’s a Nürburgring-tuned monster with an appetite for the Ford Focus RS, Subaru WRX STI, and Volkswagen Golf R, yet is rather livable doing everyday, mundane trips around town. Honda somehow engineered the Type R to do both, though the phrase about being a jack of all trade and master of none definitely applies.

The Type R is based on the Civic Hatchback but receives extra structural adhesives for a more rigid chassis. It also gets a unique suspension system, complete with adaptive dampers, stiffer spring rates, and thicker anti-roll bars. And of course, the Type R has its own powertrain – a souped-up version of the Accord’s 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder. Here it makes 306 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 295 pound-feet of torque from 2,500 up to 4,500 rpm. Honda chose to forego a complex and heavy all-wheel-drive system like the Ford, Subaru, and Volkswagen; instead, going with a front-wheel drive setup that allows for an extremely respectable curb weight of only 3,100 pounds. It’s this combination of light weight and rigidity that make the Type R what it is. And now that you know Honda’s recipe, here’s how the final product tastes.

Continue reading for more on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.

Behind the Wheel


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“The Civic’s dash is visually interesting and most controls are logically arranged.”

Before diving into driving impressions, let’s cover Honda’s work with the 10th-generation Civic’s interior and the Type R improvements. First, the Civic’s dash is visually interesting and most controls are logically arranged. The gauges are easy to read at a glance, the steering wheel controls are mostly intuitive, and the infotainment system’s menus are easy to breeze through.

There are a few complaints, though. The gauge cluster could offer more vehicle information like individual tire pressure, and the five-way controller on the steering wheel confusingly operates both the radio stations and the gauge cluster info. Second, the HVAC system’s controls are hidden in a menu within the infotainment. Yeah, there’s a big “climate” button right under the screen, but the system often takes a few seconds to bring up the controls. These include the fan speed and blower location – two things that are commonly used. Beyond that, thankfully there are few drawbacks.


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“It offers tons of cubby spots and clever spaces for things”

Scoring points for handiness, the Civic offers tons of cubby spots and clever spaces for things. The center armrest slides rearward for access to more cup holders, a third cupholder resides at the console’s bottom – perfect for those Trenta-sized drinks at Starbucks. Ahead of the shifter is a perfect spot for cell phones. The cubby includes a pass-through to a lower level where a USB port and 12-volt power plug are located. This makes managing cords a simple task.

Honda made a big deal about its sporty front seats at the Type R launch event I attended. They aren’t Recaro or Sparco branded, but are actually designed and built in-house. The seats are obviously heavily bolstered, which makes tossing the Type R into corners all the more fun. They do lack a lumbar adjustment, which I discovered after about three hours behind the wheel, does lead to a groaning. My pregnant wife also bemoaned them after about five minutes. Still, they are mostly very comfortable and certainly fit the Type R’s persona.


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“There is a respectable amount of legroom and headroom for life-size adults”

Rear seat comfort is surprisingly good, too. There is a respectable amount of legroom and headroom for life-size adults. Unfortunately, the center seat and folding armrest were cut in the name of weight savings, making inboard elbows lonesome and the Type R a four-person car.

Of course, the Type R is still a hatchback, so it offers the same cargo volume as the standard Civic Hatch. That equates to 25.7 cubic feet of cargo room behind the rear seats and an impressive 46.2 cubic feet with them folded. A retractable cargo shade keeps prying eyes at bay.

Driving Impressions


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“A light steering effort is needed in Comfort, while a heavy hand is needed in +R mode, which helps control the car’s dartiness at higher speeds”

The Civic Type R rides on adaptive dampers that correlate to three drive modes. Comfort, naturally, provides the smoothest ride, while Sport tightens things up a bit. Racetracks will find +R mode is best, with the suspension at its firmest. The drive modes also modulate the responsiveness of the steering and throttle. A light steering effort is needed in Comfort, while a heavy hand is needed in +R mode, which helps control the car’s dartiness at higher speeds. The low-effort setting makes for a more pleasurable drive around town. The opposite is true for the throttle; comfort mode has a heavy throttle that’s less sensitive, while +R mode only requires a light touch to send the 2.0-liter turbo-four skyrocketing to its 7,000-rpm redline. Sport mode splits the difference quite well.

Around town, Sport mode (which is the default mode) is all that’s needed. The engine willingly sings through its wide torque range between 2,500 and 4,500 rpm and up to its peak horsepower of 306 located at 6,500 rpm. The steering is incredibly direct and will send the Type R carving through a corner as if it were on rails. That’s no hyperbole, either. The Type R only exhibits understeer at the very limit, which is nearly unobtainable on the street. I was only able to find front-end plow when barreling into a corner at The Ridge Motorsports Park at Honda’s drive event back in August. Even then, the effect is minimal.


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“The brakes offer just the right amount of initial grip to avoid sudden jerks, yet will rip your face off if pressed hard”

The big Brembo brakes are just as good. Around town, the brakes offer just the right amount of initial grip to avoid sudden jerks, yet will rip your face off if pressed hard. Honda gave the Type R 13.8-inch, drilled front rotors over the standard Civic’s 11.1-inch discs. Out back are Honda-branded calipers, but they are mounted on 12.0-inch rotors compared to the standard 10.2-inch units. The front bumper includes hidden inlets that dump cool air right onto the brakes. The result is immense levels of stopping power, full stop after full stop. During the track event, the brakes showed no signs of fade even after back-to-back laps over a four-hour timeframe. Obviously, hard braking around town will never touch the brakes full capabilities.

That VTEC, Yo!


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“The 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder’s head and block are made from aluminum and its crankshaft is forged from ultra-lightweight steel”

While it an entire car to speed around a track, the engine is undeniably the focus point. Honda certainly focused on the Type R’s powerplant. The 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder’s head and block are made from aluminum and its crankshaft is forged from ultra-lightweight steel. The connecting rods and pistons are extremely light, too, along with the single-mass flywheel. Honda reinforced the main bearing caps for added strength. The result is an engine with super quick revs up to its 7,000-rpm redline and with its first major tune-up scheduled at 100,000 miles.

The VTEC system works to keep the engine making peak power and torque, regardless of the rev. The dual overhead camshafts phase to open the exhaust valves early during lower engine speeds, feeding the turbo more quickly. This eliminates turbo lag and helps generate that amazing 23.2 pounds of boost. Direct fuel injection also contributes to precise control of the engine’s operations.

2.0-liter Turbocharged Four-Cylinder
Horsepower 306 @ 6,500 rpm
Torque 295 pound-feet @ 2,500 – 4,500 rpm
Max RPM 7,000
Valvetrain DOHC; i-VTEC
Compression Ratio 9.8:1
Max Boost 23.2 PSI
Fuel System Direct injection; Premium Unleaded
Fuel Economy 22 city / 28 hwy / 25 comb

2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754518
“The only transmission available with the Civic Type R is a silky smooth six-speed manual”

The only transmission available with the Civic Type R is a silky smooth six-speed manual. Its short throws and light clutch make for quick shifts that anyone can nail. The gearbox also features automatic rev matching, which blips the throttle head of a downshift. It can be turned off, but even when on, the system doesn’t detract from the enthusiast’s driving experience.

A limited-slip differential keeps the Type R from being a one-wheel-wonder. It keeps both front tires fighting for grip rather than just overpowering a single tire that’s lost traction. It might seem like overkill on a four-cylinder, front-wheel drive hatchback, but the limited-slip is honestly needed, even with the massive 245/30R20 Continental SportContact 6 summer performance tires. And thankfully the rear tires are the same size, allowing for a tire rotation. That’ll probably be needed pretty soon as the Contis only have a tread wear rating of 240.

Final Thoughts


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The 2017 Honda Civic Type R is a helluva machine. Sure, it’s fantastic fun on a racetrack, but it’s also extremely livable on the daily. Perhaps the Volkswagen Golf R is better suited for daily driving, but the Type R is miles more fun. The Civic’s downfalls of a noisy interior, awkward HVAC controls, and a somewhat stiff ride thanks to the thin tire sidewalls are a fair trade-off for the soulful way the thing drives. Even a trip to the store is exciting, not to mention all the attention that gravitates toward the expressive bodywork.

Stick around for more content on the Honda Civic Type R. More is on the way!.

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754485

Here’s How Honda Manages Air on the 2017 Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754504

The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754489

Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R’s Suspension


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754481

Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver


2017 Honda Civic Type R – Driven - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the Honda Civic Type R.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719346

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Type R.

PostHeaderIcon Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver

At its heart, the Honda Civic Type R is still a Civic hatchback. That’s the key. It still offers 25.7 cubic feet of cargo room behind the rear seats, an impressive 46.2 cubic feet with them folded, and will comfortably hold two adults when not. The Civic Type R’s only downfall compared to its more pedestrian brother is its missing second-row middle seat. Everything else (size wise) remains unchanged through the Type R-ification.

What’s that mean? The 306-horsepower hot hatch makes a good daily driver. There’s room for a trip to IKEA, car seats fit just fine, and all the niceties like dual-zone climate controls abound. But there is more to being a good daily driver than just having room for people and their stuff. Factors like ride quality, sound levels, seat comfort, and fuel economy are also at play. Keep reading for the details on how these factors, well… factor into the Civic Type R’s daily livability.

Continue reading for more on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.

A Hot Hatch for Everyday Hooning


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“The Civic Type R is a lightweight, sharply tuned, track monster, but its precision handling doesn’t impede its ability at being a good "car."”

The Civic Type R is a lightweight, sharply tuned, track monster, but its precision handling doesn’t impede its ability at being a good “car.” The Type R comes with adaptive dampers at all four corners. These change the ride characteristics in correlation with the three drive modes: Comfort, Sport, and +R. The names are obvious as to their intention, and the Type R defaults into the middle ground of Sport mode upon startup. This is a hot hatch, after all, and Honda figures its owners will expect a spirited drive setting each time they hop in.

Toggling down a switch near the gear shifter moves the car into Comfort mode. This not only slightly softens the suspension but also loosens up the steering effort and decreases the throttle’s twitchiness. It’s akin to waking up early without coffee; it’s there and willing, but without the edginess of that caffeine rush.


Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver - image 754502
“The EPA estimates it will average 22 mpg in the city, 28 mpg on the highway, and 25 mpg combined”

It’s here in Comfort model that the Type R feels most livable. The throttle takes more effort to spur high revs from the 2.0-liter turbo-four, which when combined with smooth shifts on the notchy yet buttery six-speed manual’s short-throw shifter and light clutch pedal, provide a calming atmosphere. The shifter and clutch combo are very forgiving and free of jerkiness or driveline lash. The rev matching system makes downshifting child’s play, especially thanks to the 2.0-liter’s willingness to rev, even in Comfort mode.

The Type R is surprisingly frugal with its premium fuel, too. The EPA estimates it will average 22 mpg in the city, 28 mpg on the highway, and 25 mpg combined. It might not be a Toyota Prius, but the Type R does pretty well at not hurting its owners at the pump.


Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver - image 754506
“The front seats are somewhat challenging to slide into, a bit tight once in, and somewhat hard to pull yourself out of”

Of course, the Type R is no limousine. Even in its softest settings, the ride can be punishing and the tire noise can be intrusive on rough pavement. Much of that is due to the ultra-skinny 245/30R20 tires. Thirty-series tires are basically rubber bands seen on Cadillac Escalades in late 2000s rap videos. There is so little sidewall that every pebble translates into vibrations and kicks into the cabin. For those used to a firmer ride, it’s a very forgivable attribute. For those (like my pregnant wife) who would rather ride in a Cadillac, the Type R can be draining. My wife also bemoaned the Type R’s heavily bolstered front seats. They are somewhat challenging to slide into, a bit tight once in, and somewhat hard to pull yourself out of. Younger buyers who fancy skinny jeans shouldn’t mind at all.

Final Thoughts


Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver - image 754483

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R isn’t the quickest hot-hatch to 60 mph, the fastest on an open road, or the most advanced in terms of whiz-bang drivetrain components, but what it lacks in raw power or AWD grip, it more than makes up in lightness, refinement, interior space, and Honda’s reputation for reliability. Minus a few quirks, the Type R makes for a fantastic daily driver. A calm, somewhat mature Civic Hatchback lurks somewhere under that outlandish aero package and that makes for a great pairing with its weekend track star credentials. Best of all, the Type R costs a few thousand less than the competition, barring any dealership markups, of course. It starts at $34,775.

References

Honda Civic Type R – Driven


2017 Honda Civic Type R – Driven - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the Honda Civic Type R.

Honda Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719346

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Type R.

2017 Honda Civic Hatchback – Driven


2017 Honda Civic Hatchback – Driven - image 713620

Read our full driven review on the Honda Civic Hatchback.

2017 Honda Civic Hatchback


2017 Honda Civic Hatchback - image 689347

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Hatchback.

PostHeaderIcon Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R’s Suspension

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R is the newest hot hatch in the American market, but it’s not the most beastly contender. In fact, that title easily goes to the Ford Focus RS – the 350-horsepower AWD monster with drift mode. Rather than one-upping the Focus RS, the Honda development team aimed for lightweight precision and focused on drivability. The goal was creating a fully track-capable hatchback that was completely livable on public roads during daily driving. A substantial amount of math an engineering later, the Type R debuted with a unique suspension system that handles both.

Despite the Type R’s newness to the scene, we’ve had plenty of time behind the wheel. Honda had us at the launch event in August and we have one in the driveway as this is being written. (Believe us, it’s hard to remain behind the computer when seeing a red Type R through the window.) At the launch event in Washington State, Honda provided each journalist with their own Type R, allowing for uninterrupted driving and relief from awkward conversations with an unknown co-driver about their bad speeding habits. Track time at The Ridge Motorsports Park showed exactly how well the Type R could dance and provided a more intimate feeling of the car’s handling. Now we’re evaluating the Type R on familiar pavement. The consensus is that Honda did its homework. The Type R truly does offer a world-class driving experience with few trade-offs. We still think road noise is a bit too loud, but the low curb weight of only 3,117 pounds makes us understand the missing sound deadening material.

Continue reading for a full run-down of the Type R’s suspension.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729286
“The Type R gets 42.7 feet of structural adhesive in high-stress areas that are simply not present in the standard Civic Hatchback”

Honda engineers started with the Civic’s body. First, the new 10th-generation Civic is stronger and lighter than the previous car, but second, the Type R gets 42.7 feet of structural adhesive in high-stress areas that are simply not present in the standard Civic Hatchback. This leads to a 12 percent increase in lateral rigidity.

Mounted to the unibody is the Type R’s four-wheel independent suspension. Out back, the suspension remains very similar to the standard Civic’s, though it has unique active dampers, thicker anti-roll bars, and is 1.2 inches wider. Up front is where the magic really happens.

Behind a front-wheel-drive car, Honda had to overcome the Type R’s prodigious 306 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque from inducing unwanted torque steer – the effect of the engine’s power turning the steering wheel via drive force applied to the front tires. Honda uses what’s called a dual-axis front strut in order to counter this. Basically, the mountings for the front hubs are much closer to the hub and further away from the MacPherson strut tower. Aluminum knuckles help reduce unsprung weight while a thicker, 29mm anti-roll bar adds more control in hard cornering.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729272
“The front track is also 2.0 inches wider and the 245/30ZR20 summer-performance tires are an inch wider than the standard Civic’s equipment”

The front track is also 2.0 inches wider and the 245/30ZR20 summer-performance tires are an inch wider than the standard Civic’s equipment. That’s what necessitates the Type R’s widened bodywork.

As for the springs, the Type R uses coil springs with a spring rate 1.6 times greater than the stock car, while the anti-roll bar is 2.4 times more rigid. Even the bushings that hold everything together are nearly two times as firm. The Type R’s silver bullet is its Adaptive Damper System. The ADS has three firmness settings that correspond to the Type R’s three drive modes. The modes are Comfort, Sport, and +R. Each has their place and is dramatically different than the other.

Comfort mode is best suited for the street. It softens the dampers making imperfections in the road more bearable. The throttle is less twitchy and slightly more pedal travel is needed to spur the engine on. Sport mode is the driver’s choice for twisty roads. The throttle instantly becomes more responsive, the suspension is more ridges for better body control, and the entire car just feels more aggressive. When in +R mode, those Sport-mode attributes are multiplied 10 fold. It’s the mode best reserved for the track, especially since the adaptive dampers feel like they’ve been replaced with unbendable steel beams. The Type R in +R mode feels ridiculously nimble. Much of that can be attributed to the car’s 3,110-pound curb weight and super sticky tires.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729293
“The Type R in +R mode feels ridiculously nimble.”

On the track, we found the Type R to only exhibit very mild and predictable understeer only at the limit. Otherwise, the car tracks straight and true, offering a fun-filled and safe driving experience. Adding to that is the lightweight clutch and silky smooth six-speed shifter.

Hitting the Brakes


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729278
“Big Brembo calipers with four pistons grab 13.8-inch drilled rotors”

The Type R is impressively good at stopping, too. The front brakes are vastly upgraded over the standard Civic’s binders. Big Brembo calipers with four pistons grab 13.8-inch drilled rotors. (The stock rotors only measure 11.1 inches in diameter.) Under-body cooling vents direct air to the front brakes for long-lasting performance. Out back, the Civic’s 10.2-inch solid rotors are upgraded to 12.0-inch discs, though a single-piston caliper is still used. Combined, the brakes haul the Civic Type R from 60 mph to a full stop in an utterly short 99 feet.
And for those wondering, the sprint back to 60 mph only takes 5.4 seconds thanks to the Type R’s wonderful 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder.

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719399

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R

The Honda Civic Type R is powered by a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder constructed from aluminum. It uses Honda’s proven VTEC system to phase the timing of the 16 overhead valves. Rotational mass is kept down thanks to sodium-filled exhaust valves and lightweight pistons. A short blip of the throttle will have the 2.0-liter screaming at its 7,000-rpm redline in very short order. Thankfully, redline isn’t required for making peak horsepower. All 306 galloping ponies are in full stampede at 6,500 rpm and the 295 pound-feet of torque peak at only 2,500 rpm but stays through 4,500 rpm.

Temperatures are kept in check by an intercooler, a radiator, and four separate inlets into the engine bay. The lowest inlet in the grille chills the turbo’s intercooler while the space below the Honda H directs air to the engine’s radiator. The upper slot just below the hood is what feeds fresh air into the intake. Last but not least, the hood scoop is used to push cool air down the backside of the engine while relieving positive air pressure under the hood and thereby reducing lift.

More cooling happens via the oil jets that squirt the underside of the piston and the water-cooled, two-piece exhaust manifold. As for those oil jets, they not only cool the pistons and cylinder walls, they also provide a constant flow of lubrication.

After air leaves the unique exhaust manifold, it travels down a single exhaust pipe. Behind the rear axle, the pipe forks off into three seconds. The outer pipes go to large mufflers, while the center pipe feeds a resonator. The three each feel their own exhaust tip in the center of the bumper. Honda says the center resonator is used to control mid-rev booming inside the cabin, while the outer mufflers move vast amounts of air at high speeds. Interestingly, the center resonator actually generates negative pressure at higher revs. The result is a snarling yet not overbearing exhaust note – both from inside and outside the car.

Read our full, driven review of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.

Continue reading for charts and stats.

Drivetrain Specifications


The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 729258
Engine Type Turbocharged In-Line 4-Cylinder
Turbocharger Single-Scroll MHI TD04 with Internal Wastegate
Boost Pressure 22.8 psi
Displacement (cc) 1,996
Horsepower (SAE net) 306 HP @ 6,500 RPM
Torque (SAE net) 295 LB-FT @ 2,500-4,500 RPM
Fuel economy (City/Highway/Combined) (mpg) 22 / 28 / 25
Curb Weight (lbs.) 3,117
0 to 60 mph 4.9 seconds
Quarter-mile 13.5 seconds at 108 mph
Top Speed 169 mph

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719399

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon Watch How Honda Manages Air on the 2017 Civic Type R

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R has made massive waves in the hot hatch segment since its launch midyear. The Type R blazes its own trail with a different map that Ford and Subaru use for their Focus RS and WRX STI. The Honda lacks a fancy AWD system, drift mode, or some expensive Recaro or Sparco branded seats. Rather, Honda focused on reducing mass and aerodynamics. The aero work is clearly seen when looking at the car, but there’s more to the story than just tall spoilers and big intakes.

Rob Keough with Honda Civic Product Planning goes into deep detail on all the Type R’s aerodynamic surfaces and cooling ductwork in this five-minute video from Honda. Keough goes through the visual tour of the car’s thermal package first, showing the three separate intakes for the intercooler, radiator, and engine air intake. The hood-mounted scoop then channels air down and out of the engine bay. This not only helps relieve air pressure, but also reduces lift on the front wheels. A hidden air duct below the fog lights help cool the front brakes.

Around back, the wing is positioned high enough to not block rear visibility yet is thin enough to not cause any undue drag. Its angle and shape are positioned to create downforce at higher speeds, aided by vortex generators along the rear of the roof. Honda says the Type R has a drag coefficient of 0.26, which is incredibly low. By comparison, the Bugatti Chiron has a drag coefficient of .35 in its Top Speed mode. Yeah…

Of course, aerodynamics are only a part of the 2017 Civic Type R’s story. We’ll have more Type R content this week as we’ve got one in the driveway. Feel free to ask questions in the comments and we’ll answer them.

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719399

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


2017 Honda Civic Type R – Driven - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon No More Ludicrous Prices: 2018 Honda Civic Type R Goes On Sale

2018 Honda Civic Hits Dealers in Full Force

The Honda Civic Type R was finally launched in the United States in 2017 (for the first time in 20 years) and caused lots of chaos at dealerships, which had to cope with incredible demand for very low supply. The first run was preordered in a matter of hours, and many dealers tried to speculate and used all sorts of tricks to up the sticker. Some of those who preordered a Type R tried to resell their orders at higher prices too, sometimes well in excess of $70,000. But it looks like all these shenanigans may finally be over, as the 2018-model-year Civic Type R went on sale in the United States.

The beefed-up hatchback retails from $34,100, excluding the $890 destination charge and other costs. Definitely much better than the $50,000 sticker some dealerships were asking, or the $80,000+ some nut jobs were trying to score by selling their preorders. The only bad news here is that demand is so high that there may still be a long waiting line at dealerships, but the ordering and delivery process should become easier in a couple of months. On a related note, the Type R turbocharged engine is now also available as a crate engine for amateur and professional race team through the company’s motorsport division.

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719343

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.



Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon You Can Have the Honda Civic Type R Crate Engine For $6.5K

For years, Honda enthusiasts in the United States watched with envy as Europe and Asia had access to the awesome, beefed-up Civic Type R. Launched in 1997, the Type R remained a forbidden fruit for U.S. gearheads for decades. Two decades to be more specific, as the high-performance Civic didn’t cross the pond to North America until 2017. And, needless to say, it created the utmost hype, with backed-up preorders and crazy price speculation over to-be-delivered cars. With the hatchback finally on its way to customers, Honda has more good news for Type R fans: the turbocharged 2.0-liter powerplant is now available as a crate engine.

The big announcement was made at the 2017 SEMA Show, where Honda confirmed that enthusiasts would be able to purchase the Type R engine through Honda Performance Development’s Honda Racing Line program. The crate engine is rated at the same 306 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque as the one in the road car. The turbocharged four-banger is priced at $6,519.87, but here is a catch: it’s only available for “verified, closed-course racing applications,” which means it can’t be used in road-going models.

Continue reading for the full story.

Why It Matters?


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719399
“This crate engine is great news for both amateur and professional racing drivers alike”

On top of being an appealing car of regular drivers, the Civic Type R was also seen as a great engine source by racing enthusiasts. So, this crate engine is great news for both amateur and professional racing drivers alike, who finally have access to Honda’s most powerful engine in the United States. It’s also reliable, which makes things that much better on the race track. With Honda Racing Line involved in the project, drivers will also benefit from something similar to factory support, which is way better than just sourcing an engine and trying to make it work by doing your own research and development.

The Bad News


2016 Honda Civic - image 651097
“If you were dreaming of building your own Type R version of the Civic sedan, the Accord, or any other Honda available in showrooms, it won't happen anytime soon”

Unfortunately, this engine isn’t yet available for road cars. So if you were dreaming of building your own Type R version of the Civic sedan, the Accord, or any other Honda available in showrooms, it won’t happen anytime soon. Sure, it could be offered outside the Honda Racing Line program in the future, but it will be tricky to install this engine in a production model and get it homologated for road use. So yeah, this announcement is somewhat disappointing when it comes to road cars, but at least we’ll see more of this fantastic engine on race tracks across the United States!

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719343

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


2017 SEMA Show – Preview - image 741107

Read more news on the 2017 SEMA Show.

PostHeaderIcon Jennings Motor Group Renders 10 Everyday Family Cars As Supercars

From wide body kits to free flowing exhaust kits, carbon fiber interior vinyl wraps to oversized rear wings, there’s no shortage of aftermarket options when it comes to making the family errand-runner as close as possible to looking like a full-fledged supercar. But what if we could snap our fingers and turn that commonplace commuter into a seven-figure eater of worlds capable of hanging with the best from Ferrari, Porsche, and Koenigsegg? That’s exactly what Jennings Motor Group did with these 10 everyday family cars, now rendered to supercar stardom.

Included in the list are favorites from the likes of Mini, Renault, Fiat, Honda, Volkswagen, Toyota, Smart, Kia, Tesla, and Lada, each of which was blessed with the traditional supercar stance and more sharp ends than a needle factory. Some make a little more sense than the others, but regardless, we think the renderings look badass, and wouldn’t mind if the respective automakers took the hint that more supercars are indeed always welcome. Of course, we want to know – do these renderings for it for you as well? Which is your favorite? Let us know in the comments, but before you post, check out all 10 renderings after the jump.

Continue reading to learn more about 10 everyday family cars rendered as supercars.

PostHeaderIcon What Makes A Civic Type R?

The entry of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R into the U.S. market is big news – both for Honda fans and the hot hatch segment. The new Type R will only add fuel to the already large flame burning between the Ford Focus RS, Volkswagen Golf R, and Subaru WRX STI. Needless to say, Honda had to bring its A-game. Turning the 10th-generation Civic into competitive hot hatch wouldn’t be an easy task, but the Type R had to perform as good or better to be taken seriously. Well, thanks to time behind the Type R’s wheel, both on the track and bombing down mountain roads, it’s clear Honda has built a worthy rival for its global counterparts.

It all starts with the bones of Honda’s 10th-generation Civic, which debuted back in 2015. Even the base car was designed with a stronger structure for added rigidity, knowing in two years’ time, the Type R would need the extra strength. The same is true for the Civic hatchback, which is new for 2017. But Honda didn’t stop there. Engineers added even more structural adhesives to bind the bodywork together. A stiffer yet lighter suspension with adaptive dampers, bigger wheels, and stickier tires were added, too. And of course, Honda dumped that 1.5-liter turbocharged four-cylinder for something with a bit more power – a 2.0-liter turbo-four with 132 more horsepower and 133 pound-feet more torque. Add to that the aggressive yet functional aerodynamic features and heavily bolstered front bucket seats, and the Type R’s pedigree begins to take shape.

Continue reading for more info on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.

PostHeaderIcon Everyday Life With the 2017 Honda Civic Type R

Honda’s new Civic Type R is a beast on the track. Its 306 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque are more than enough to push this 3,100-pound car toward speeds anyone besides a pro driver should feel comfortable with. My time with at The Ridge Motorsports Park proved that much. Yet, despite the Civic Type R’s race-bred underpinnings, it’s still a Civic hatchback. That means it should be easy to live with, easy to drive slowly, and easy to throw cargo into. So, how’d it do?

Wonderfully. The Civic Type R still offers a pleasant driving experience around down. The light clutch and short-throw shifter are just as enjoyable on the street as on the track. And despite their heavy bolstering, Honda’s front bucket seats are comfortable to get into and easy to get out of. They remain supportive over a long drive, too. The rear seats aren’t touched in the Type R transformation, so they remain spacious for the Civic’s class, yet do lack a center armrest and air vents.

But the value really arrives when it’s time to haul stuff. The Civic boasts a class-leading 25.7 cubic feet of cargo space behind the second- row seat. Fold the 60/40-bench flat, and the Civic Hatch has 46.2 cubic feet of room. The hatchback’s rear opening is wide and tall, allowing for ungainly items like furniture and boxes to easily slide in.

When it comes to storing everyday items like drinks and cell phones, the Civic offers tons of options. The center console is ingeniously designed with a deep container under the armrest. It houses three cup holders – two of which are mounted midway down on a slidable track. The third is way down low, perfect for those Trenta-sized Starbucks drinks. A small storage cubby ahead of the shifter is great for phones and knick-knacks. A cable pass-through lets charging cables run into the lower tier area where Honda locates the USB and 12-volt charge ports. Large door pockets add to the usable (and reachable from behind the wheel) storage space.

On the downside, the Civic Type R rides on 245/30ZR-20 performance wheels and tires. While great on smooth pavement, the 30-series sidewalls offer little cushion from potholes and bumps. This leaves the active dampers with all the work of quelling uneven pavement. Road noise is prevalent, too, imitating mostly from the rear of the interior. Long drives on older pavement might spur on a headache from those sensitive to booming noises. I don’t remember noise being an issue in the 2017 Honda Civic Hatchback EX-L Navi I previously tested, so it’s likely a trade-off for the added lightness and stickier rubber needed to make the Type R perform. In truth, these negligible complaints won’t turn away those eager customers. The Type R isn’t trying to pass as a Cadillac, after all.

Thankfully, the firm ride is about the only trade-off for upgrading to the Type R over the standard Civic Hatchback – at least in terms of everyday livability. The big wing and aggressive aero bits might make it a target for speeding tickets. Just ask one of the journalists at this press event…

PostHeaderIcon Flogging The 2017 Honda Civic Type R

It doesn’t get hotter than the 2017 Honda Civic Type R – at least this month. That comes as no surprise since the Type R is just now making its debut in the U.S. after decades of devouring foreign roads in markets worldwide. This performance variant is based on the 10th-generation Civic, a compact car with a pedigree that needs no explanation. Honda wanted me to give the new Type R a swing, so they flew me to Seattle, Washington for some seat time in those heavily bolstered front buckets on winding mountain roads and through all 16 corners of The Ridge Motorsports Park just north of Olympia.

The Civic Type R arrives amidst a raging fight in the hot hatch segment. The Ford Focus RS and its ridiculous powertrain and Drift Mode square up against the dethroned champion, the Volkswagen Golf R and the rally-bred Subaru WRX STI. What these competitors all have in common are four cylinders being force-fed via turbochargers, six-speed manual transmissions, and AWD. Tit for tat, these compact brawlers are mostly equal – save for the Focus RS’ extra horsepower and the Civic Type R’s lack of AWD. Wait, what? Yep, Honda ditched the idea of a heavy, complex, and parasitic AWD system in favor of a lighter curb weight, a limited slip differential, and its dual-axis front MacPherson struts. The result is a 3,100-pound car that hangs with its toughest competitor despite its 44-horsepower, 55-pound-foot disadvantage.

Continue reading for my on-track driving impressions.

PostHeaderIcon Honda Civic Type R – Driven

Performance vehicles are pushing the envelope beyond the imagination these days. Insane horsepower numbers and bleeding-edge technology contribute to ridiculous lap times and sub-four-second sprints to 60 mph. But more often than not, these all-out performance machines – think Chevrolet Corvette, Jaguar F-Type, and Porsche Cayman – are too compromised for daily living and cost a significant chunk of change. But imagine combining the impressive performance of a two-seater coupe with the functionality of a five-door hatchback and a reasonable price. That’s exactly what that hot hatch segment does. And now for the 2017 model year, Honda has launched its all-new Civic Type R. What’s more, Honda is bringing it to America for the first time.

Based on the new 10th-generation Honda Civic, the new Type R adds power, a sophisticated suspension system, and functional aero to the family-friendly Civic hatchback. It’s like having cake and eating it, too. Now, the Civic Type R has some stiff competition. The 350-horsepower Ford Focus RS is the reigning performance king and the Volkswagen Golf R is the grown-up’s idea of a performance-minded hatchback. And if having a hatchback isn’t a priority but hitting the rally circuit is, there’s always the Subaru WRX STI. The Civic Type R sort of carves its own niche in the segment with an outlandish design, heavily bolstered front buckets, and the lowest starting price of the bunch, but mixes it with only 306 horsepower and the lack of all-wheel drive. To find out how the Civic Type R recipe tastes, Honda flew me to Washington State for time on a private racetrack and scenic drives near the Olympic National Forest. Here’s what I found.

Continue reading for the full driven review.

PostHeaderIcon Honda Has Some Pricey Accessories For The Civic Type R In Japan

Every new car owner is faced with the tempting realization that new cars come with their own perks, including personalizing the car and adding whatever accessories are available. That temptation is even more understandable when the new car is the Honda Civic Type R. That’s probably why everybody is freaking out about these new accessories Honda just released for the Type R. The only caveats are that they’re only available in Japan, and more importantly, they cost more than you expect them to.

To put it in perspective, accessory prices in Japan make the prices at Hamilton Honda seem like bargains by comparison. It’s that incredible. Take for example the three-piece, red accent trim that sits just above the front grille and the headlights. That piece costs $293 based on current conversation rates. That’s actually a decent price if you think about it. But would you pay $1,564 for a carbon rear wing with a crimson polyester weave? How about Crystal Black Pearl or Red mirror covers for $137 a piece? While we’re at it, Type-R-branded floor mats have been priced at $577, close to double the price of what Hamilton Honda is asking for the same item. The prices are incredible, but the circumstances of the Japanese market do dictate that they’re priced as such. It’s a good thing that they do a fantastic job of dressing up the Civic Type R because, with the accessories in place, the hot hatch looks dramatically more potent and menacing.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

PostHeaderIcon This Honda Dealership Devises Crafty Way To Jack Up The Price Of The Honda Civic Type R

It’s already been established that the Honda Civic Type-R is a popular car. Demand for it is high and supplies are limited. That’s the sad reality here in the U.S. and it’s given dealerships the excuse, right or wrong, of jacking up the price of the hot hatch for the always convenient excuse of “business reasons.” One New Jersey dealership, though, seems to have taken the ingenuity to a whole new level by slapping expensive and required add-ons to the hot hatch’s price tag.

It is worth noting this New Jersey-based Hamilton Honda isn’t asking any premiums on the hot hatch itself. The Civic Type R carries an MSRP price of $34,755, which is laudable by itself. Unfortunately, it doesn’t paint the whole picture because the dealership is charging ridiculous prices for its “equipment and dealer add-ons,” including a $630 interior illumination option that only costs $125 on Honda’s official configurator for the Civic Type R. There are many more examples of these overpriced options, but the biggest eyebrow-raiser came when the same Redditor who uncovered the price list of the Civic Type R was rebuffed when he asked if he could buy the hot hatch without any of the options. And so, if you’re looking to buy the Honda Civic Type sitting inside the Hamilton Honda dealership, you’ll need to fork over $47,463 for it, even if you have little to no use for some of the other options and accessories. Do the math and that’s well over $13,000 above Honda’s MSRP.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

PostHeaderIcon Honda Civic Type R Gets The One Republic Treatment

Yes, you’re reading that right. The Honda Civic Type R, the purveyor of hot hatch madness, just received a styling overhaul courtesy of One Republic, the American band that’s responsible for hit songs like “Apologize,” “Counting Stars,” and “Secret.” It seems like an ideal match from a popularity standpoint, and to the surprise of many, the finished product actually looks pretty good, save for a few complaints. Can’t have everything, can you, One Republic?

The one-off Civic Type R is actually part of Honda’s 2017 Honda Civic Tour where fans of the model will get a chance to see what’s new and cracking in the world of the Civic. One Republic has been tapped to headline this tour and that explains why Honda asked the band to design their own stylistic interpretation of the hot hatch. This is the result and, well, I actually like it. It’s not obnoxious in any way and the use of the matte black and red accents was done in a way that they don’t take away from the things that make the Civic Type R the desirable piece of machinery that it is. Whether you agree with me or not, we will get to see more of the One Republic-designed Honda Civic Type R in the coming months as it embarks on a cross-country tour in the U.S. alongside a custom Honda Rebel motorcycle that was also designed by the band.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

PostHeaderIcon Honda Shows up to Goodwood with a Unique interpretation of the Civic Type R

We all know that human and machine are becoming one. People can’t put down their smartphones for two seconds, Grandpa is walking around with a pacemaker to keep his heart going, and it’s only a matter of time before we’re able to replace our limbs with full-fledged robotic counterparts. Elon Musk is even doubling down on his notion of connecting the human brain directly to computers with his newest company, Neuralink. It’s only a matter of time before we can transfer human consciousness and become a race of sentient cyborg beings hellbent on spreading our archaic ideals across the galaxy and conquering the universe. Okay, so, that’s a bit too much, but there’s no denying that the gap between human and machine is getting increasingly smaller, and Honda has taken this idea into its own hands by creating a Honda Civic Type R and the Fireblade bike out of humans. That’s right; Humans.

It’s all a big show to celebrate the kicking off of this year’s Goodwood Festival of Speed, and you have to admit, it’s one of the most creative ways to do so. All told, 12 performance artists manage to intertwine themselves enough to generate the basic silhouette of the Civic Type R and the Fireblade bike. The whole thing has been orchestrated by the Honda Challenge Lab, a self-proclaimed “playground of extraordinary ideas inspiring curiosity and learning.” Needless to say, if you happen to be checking out the festival this year, the Honda booth is one place you certainly want to visit – it’s not very often you see a group of people shaping themselves into vehicles.

PostHeaderIcon Pops’ Rants: Civic Type R Drama and Why the New GranTurismo Sucks

The 2017 Goodwood Festival of Speed is well underway, and I couldn’t be happier. Long live internet video streaming, old track, short but exciting race tracks, and the good people taking care of the Goodwood House. I’m a happy chap, but hey, there’s still room for rants. And boy there’s plenty to talk about this week. You might find it hard to believe, but there’s something about Goodwood that has been bothering me for years. It’s the hill climb record, which stands since 1999 when Nick Heidfeld completed the course in 41.6 seconds in a McLaren MP4/13 Formula One car. Really, now; isn’t there anyone capable enough to put together a car that’s faster than that?

Yes, I know, it’s a Formula One car and these things are really fast and aerodynamic, but the MP4/13 dates back to 1999. That’s 18 years. Eighteen!!! You know what changed in 18 years on the Nurburgring? The lap record was improved by more than a minute. That’s about 15 percent, which makes sense given how fast cars and technology are evolving nowadays. Yet, no one is able to put Heidfeld’s record to rest. Not even the Peugeot 208 T16, which set a seemingly unbeatable record at Pikes Peak, was able to do that back in 2014 when it completed the course three seconds slower.

Continue reading for the full story.

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