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Archive for the ‘Honda Type-R’ Category

PostHeaderIcon The Next-Gen Honda Civic Type-R Will Most Likely Be a Hybrid-Powered Performance Beast

Honda has not been doing well in the European market and has made some big plans to boost its sales. By 2025, the Japanese giant will electrify all of its models in Europe. And, this is where the Civic Type-R comes into the picture. Based on the comments made by a senior Honda executive at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show, the next-gen Honda Civic Type-R will be electrified alongside a drastic change in design direction from the sharp and angular image of recent generations. Will the Civic Type-R’s performance remain the same even then?

PostHeaderIcon Wallpaper of the Day: 2017 Honda Civic Type R

The Civic Type R is here in the United States? Boy is it a good time to be alive! To make it better, download one of our wallpapers and give your desktop some of that Type R treatment!

PostHeaderIcon Wallpaper of the Day: 2017 Honda Civic Type R

Centered, triple exhaust outlets - a first

The Civic Type R is here in the United States? Boy is it a good time to be alive! To make it better, download one of our wallpapers and give your desktop some of that Type R treatment!

2017 Honda Civic Type R


Wallpaper of the Day: 2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719360

Check out our full review of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R or slide on down to the gallery below for more wallpaper selections!

PostHeaderIcon Wallpaper of the Day: 2017 Honda Civic Type R

Centered, triple exhaust outlets - a first

The Civic Type R is here in the United States? Boy is it a good time to be alive! To make it better, download one of our wallpapers and give your desktop some of that Type R treatment!

2017 Honda Civic Type R


Wallpaper of the Day: 2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719360

Check out our full review of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R or slide on down to the gallery below for more wallpaper selections!

PostHeaderIcon 2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel

A
Rallye Red 2017 Honda Civic Type R has graced my driveway for the last week. Visible from my office window, the hot hatch just begs to be driven – and driven hard. It’s a Nürburgring-tuned monster with an appetite for the Ford Focus RS, Subaru WRX STI, and Volkswagen Golf R, yet is rather livable doing everyday, mundane trips around town. Honda somehow engineered the Type R to do both, though the phrase about being a jack of all trade and master of none definitely applies.

The Type R is based on the Civic Hatchback but receives extra structural adhesives for a more rigid chassis. It also gets a unique suspension system, complete with adaptive dampers, stiffer spring rates, and thicker anti-roll bars. And of course, the Type R has its own powertrain – a souped-up version of the Accord’s 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder. Here it makes 306 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 295 pound-feet of torque from 2,500 up to 4,500 rpm. Honda chose to forego a complex and heavy all-wheel-drive system like the Ford, Subaru, and Volkswagen; instead, going with a front-wheel drive setup that allows for an extremely respectable curb weight of only 3,100 pounds. It’s this combination of light weight and rigidity that make the Type R what it is. And now that you know Honda’s recipe, here’s how the final product tastes.

Continue reading for more on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.

Behind the Wheel


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754508
“The Civic’s dash is visually interesting and most controls are logically arranged.”

Before diving into driving impressions, let’s cover Honda’s work with the 10th-generation Civic’s interior and the Type R improvements. First, the Civic’s dash is visually interesting and most controls are logically arranged. The gauges are easy to read at a glance, the steering wheel controls are mostly intuitive, and the infotainment system’s menus are easy to breeze through.

There are a few complaints, though. The gauge cluster could offer more vehicle information like individual tire pressure, and the five-way controller on the steering wheel confusingly operates both the radio stations and the gauge cluster info. Second, the HVAC system’s controls are hidden in a menu within the infotainment. Yeah, there’s a big “climate” button right under the screen, but the system often takes a few seconds to bring up the controls. These include the fan speed and blower location – two things that are commonly used. Beyond that, thankfully there are few drawbacks.


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754509
“It offers tons of cubby spots and clever spaces for things”

Scoring points for handiness, the Civic offers tons of cubby spots and clever spaces for things. The center armrest slides rearward for access to more cup holders, a third cupholder resides at the console’s bottom – perfect for those Trenta-sized drinks at Starbucks. Ahead of the shifter is a perfect spot for cell phones. The cubby includes a pass-through to a lower level where a USB port and 12-volt power plug are located. This makes managing cords a simple task.

Honda made a big deal about its sporty front seats at the Type R launch event I attended. They aren’t Recaro or Sparco branded, but are actually designed and built in-house. The seats are obviously heavily bolstered, which makes tossing the Type R into corners all the more fun. They do lack a lumbar adjustment, which I discovered after about three hours behind the wheel, does lead to a groaning. My pregnant wife also bemoaned them after about five minutes. Still, they are mostly very comfortable and certainly fit the Type R’s persona.


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754514
“There is a respectable amount of legroom and headroom for life-size adults”

Rear seat comfort is surprisingly good, too. There is a respectable amount of legroom and headroom for life-size adults. Unfortunately, the center seat and folding armrest were cut in the name of weight savings, making inboard elbows lonesome and the Type R a four-person car.

Of course, the Type R is still a hatchback, so it offers the same cargo volume as the standard Civic Hatch. That equates to 25.7 cubic feet of cargo room behind the rear seats and an impressive 46.2 cubic feet with them folded. A retractable cargo shade keeps prying eyes at bay.

Driving Impressions


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754482
“A light steering effort is needed in Comfort, while a heavy hand is needed in +R mode, which helps control the car’s dartiness at higher speeds”

The Civic Type R rides on adaptive dampers that correlate to three drive modes. Comfort, naturally, provides the smoothest ride, while Sport tightens things up a bit. Racetracks will find +R mode is best, with the suspension at its firmest. The drive modes also modulate the responsiveness of the steering and throttle. A light steering effort is needed in Comfort, while a heavy hand is needed in +R mode, which helps control the car’s dartiness at higher speeds. The low-effort setting makes for a more pleasurable drive around town. The opposite is true for the throttle; comfort mode has a heavy throttle that’s less sensitive, while +R mode only requires a light touch to send the 2.0-liter turbo-four skyrocketing to its 7,000-rpm redline. Sport mode splits the difference quite well.

Around town, Sport mode (which is the default mode) is all that’s needed. The engine willingly sings through its wide torque range between 2,500 and 4,500 rpm and up to its peak horsepower of 306 located at 6,500 rpm. The steering is incredibly direct and will send the Type R carving through a corner as if it were on rails. That’s no hyperbole, either. The Type R only exhibits understeer at the very limit, which is nearly unobtainable on the street. I was only able to find front-end plow when barreling into a corner at The Ridge Motorsports Park at Honda’s drive event back in August. Even then, the effect is minimal.


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754498
“The brakes offer just the right amount of initial grip to avoid sudden jerks, yet will rip your face off if pressed hard”

The big Brembo brakes are just as good. Around town, the brakes offer just the right amount of initial grip to avoid sudden jerks, yet will rip your face off if pressed hard. Honda gave the Type R 13.8-inch, drilled front rotors over the standard Civic’s 11.1-inch discs. Out back are Honda-branded calipers, but they are mounted on 12.0-inch rotors compared to the standard 10.2-inch units. The front bumper includes hidden inlets that dump cool air right onto the brakes. The result is immense levels of stopping power, full stop after full stop. During the track event, the brakes showed no signs of fade even after back-to-back laps over a four-hour timeframe. Obviously, hard braking around town will never touch the brakes full capabilities.

That VTEC, Yo!


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754503
“The 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder’s head and block are made from aluminum and its crankshaft is forged from ultra-lightweight steel”

While it an entire car to speed around a track, the engine is undeniably the focus point. Honda certainly focused on the Type R’s powerplant. The 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder’s head and block are made from aluminum and its crankshaft is forged from ultra-lightweight steel. The connecting rods and pistons are extremely light, too, along with the single-mass flywheel. Honda reinforced the main bearing caps for added strength. The result is an engine with super quick revs up to its 7,000-rpm redline and with its first major tune-up scheduled at 100,000 miles.

The VTEC system works to keep the engine making peak power and torque, regardless of the rev. The dual overhead camshafts phase to open the exhaust valves early during lower engine speeds, feeding the turbo more quickly. This eliminates turbo lag and helps generate that amazing 23.2 pounds of boost. Direct fuel injection also contributes to precise control of the engine’s operations.

2.0-liter Turbocharged Four-Cylinder
Horsepower 306 @ 6,500 rpm
Torque 295 pound-feet @ 2,500 – 4,500 rpm
Max RPM 7,000
Valvetrain DOHC; i-VTEC
Compression Ratio 9.8:1
Max Boost 23.2 PSI
Fuel System Direct injection; Premium Unleaded
Fuel Economy 22 city / 28 hwy / 25 comb

2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754518
“The only transmission available with the Civic Type R is a silky smooth six-speed manual”

The only transmission available with the Civic Type R is a silky smooth six-speed manual. Its short throws and light clutch make for quick shifts that anyone can nail. The gearbox also features automatic rev matching, which blips the throttle head of a downshift. It can be turned off, but even when on, the system doesn’t detract from the enthusiast’s driving experience.

A limited-slip differential keeps the Type R from being a one-wheel-wonder. It keeps both front tires fighting for grip rather than just overpowering a single tire that’s lost traction. It might seem like overkill on a four-cylinder, front-wheel drive hatchback, but the limited-slip is honestly needed, even with the massive 245/30R20 Continental SportContact 6 summer performance tires. And thankfully the rear tires are the same size, allowing for a tire rotation. That’ll probably be needed pretty soon as the Contis only have a tread wear rating of 240.

Final Thoughts


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754483

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R is a helluva machine. Sure, it’s fantastic fun on a racetrack, but it’s also extremely livable on the daily. Perhaps the Volkswagen Golf R is better suited for daily driving, but the Type R is miles more fun. The Civic’s downfalls of a noisy interior, awkward HVAC controls, and a somewhat stiff ride thanks to the thin tire sidewalls are a fair trade-off for the soulful way the thing drives. Even a trip to the store is exciting, not to mention all the attention that gravitates toward the expressive bodywork.

Stick around for more content on the Honda Civic Type R. More is on the way!.

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754485

Here’s How Honda Manages Air on the 2017 Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754504

The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754489

Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R’s Suspension


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754481

Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver


2017 Honda Civic Type R – Driven - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the Honda Civic Type R.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719346

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Type R.

PostHeaderIcon Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver

At its heart, the Honda Civic Type R is still a Civic hatchback. That’s the key. It still offers 25.7 cubic feet of cargo room behind the rear seats, an impressive 46.2 cubic feet with them folded, and will comfortably hold two adults when not. The Civic Type R’s only downfall compared to its more pedestrian brother is its missing second-row middle seat. Everything else (size wise) remains unchanged through the Type R-ification.

What’s that mean? The 306-horsepower hot hatch makes a good daily driver. There’s room for a trip to IKEA, car seats fit just fine, and all the niceties like dual-zone climate controls abound. But there is more to being a good daily driver than just having room for people and their stuff. Factors like ride quality, sound levels, seat comfort, and fuel economy are also at play. Keep reading for the details on how these factors, well… factor into the Civic Type R’s daily livability.

Continue reading for more on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.

A Hot Hatch for Everyday Hooning


Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver - image 754488
“The Civic Type R is a lightweight, sharply tuned, track monster, but its precision handling doesn’t impede its ability at being a good "car."”

The Civic Type R is a lightweight, sharply tuned, track monster, but its precision handling doesn’t impede its ability at being a good “car.” The Type R comes with adaptive dampers at all four corners. These change the ride characteristics in correlation with the three drive modes: Comfort, Sport, and +R. The names are obvious as to their intention, and the Type R defaults into the middle ground of Sport mode upon startup. This is a hot hatch, after all, and Honda figures its owners will expect a spirited drive setting each time they hop in.

Toggling down a switch near the gear shifter moves the car into Comfort mode. This not only slightly softens the suspension but also loosens up the steering effort and decreases the throttle’s twitchiness. It’s akin to waking up early without coffee; it’s there and willing, but without the edginess of that caffeine rush.


Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver - image 754502
“The EPA estimates it will average 22 mpg in the city, 28 mpg on the highway, and 25 mpg combined”

It’s here in Comfort model that the Type R feels most livable. The throttle takes more effort to spur high revs from the 2.0-liter turbo-four, which when combined with smooth shifts on the notchy yet buttery six-speed manual’s short-throw shifter and light clutch pedal, provide a calming atmosphere. The shifter and clutch combo are very forgiving and free of jerkiness or driveline lash. The rev matching system makes downshifting child’s play, especially thanks to the 2.0-liter’s willingness to rev, even in Comfort mode.

The Type R is surprisingly frugal with its premium fuel, too. The EPA estimates it will average 22 mpg in the city, 28 mpg on the highway, and 25 mpg combined. It might not be a Toyota Prius, but the Type R does pretty well at not hurting its owners at the pump.


Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver - image 754506
“The front seats are somewhat challenging to slide into, a bit tight once in, and somewhat hard to pull yourself out of”

Of course, the Type R is no limousine. Even in its softest settings, the ride can be punishing and the tire noise can be intrusive on rough pavement. Much of that is due to the ultra-skinny 245/30R20 tires. Thirty-series tires are basically rubber bands seen on Cadillac Escalades in late 2000s rap videos. There is so little sidewall that every pebble translates into vibrations and kicks into the cabin. For those used to a firmer ride, it’s a very forgivable attribute. For those (like my pregnant wife) who would rather ride in a Cadillac, the Type R can be draining. My wife also bemoaned the Type R’s heavily bolstered front seats. They are somewhat challenging to slide into, a bit tight once in, and somewhat hard to pull yourself out of. Younger buyers who fancy skinny jeans shouldn’t mind at all.

Final Thoughts


Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver - image 754483

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R isn’t the quickest hot-hatch to 60 mph, the fastest on an open road, or the most advanced in terms of whiz-bang drivetrain components, but what it lacks in raw power or AWD grip, it more than makes up in lightness, refinement, interior space, and Honda’s reputation for reliability. Minus a few quirks, the Type R makes for a fantastic daily driver. A calm, somewhat mature Civic Hatchback lurks somewhere under that outlandish aero package and that makes for a great pairing with its weekend track star credentials. Best of all, the Type R costs a few thousand less than the competition, barring any dealership markups, of course. It starts at $34,775.

References

Honda Civic Type R – Driven


2017 Honda Civic Type R – Driven - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the Honda Civic Type R.

Honda Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719346

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Type R.

2017 Honda Civic Hatchback – Driven


2017 Honda Civic Hatchback – Driven - image 713620

Read our full driven review on the Honda Civic Hatchback.

2017 Honda Civic Hatchback


2017 Honda Civic Hatchback - image 689347

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Hatchback.

PostHeaderIcon Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R’s Suspension

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R is the newest hot hatch in the American market, but it’s not the most beastly contender. In fact, that title easily goes to the Ford Focus RS – the 350-horsepower AWD monster with drift mode. Rather than one-upping the Focus RS, the Honda development team aimed for lightweight precision and focused on drivability. The goal was creating a fully track-capable hatchback that was completely livable on public roads during daily driving. A substantial amount of math an engineering later, the Type R debuted with a unique suspension system that handles both.

Despite the Type R’s newness to the scene, we’ve had plenty of time behind the wheel. Honda had us at the launch event in August and we have one in the driveway as this is being written. (Believe us, it’s hard to remain behind the computer when seeing a red Type R through the window.) At the launch event in Washington State, Honda provided each journalist with their own Type R, allowing for uninterrupted driving and relief from awkward conversations with an unknown co-driver about their bad speeding habits. Track time at The Ridge Motorsports Park showed exactly how well the Type R could dance and provided a more intimate feeling of the car’s handling. Now we’re evaluating the Type R on familiar pavement. The consensus is that Honda did its homework. The Type R truly does offer a world-class driving experience with few trade-offs. We still think road noise is a bit too loud, but the low curb weight of only 3,117 pounds makes us understand the missing sound deadening material.

Continue reading for a full run-down of the Type R’s suspension.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729286
“The Type R gets 42.7 feet of structural adhesive in high-stress areas that are simply not present in the standard Civic Hatchback”

Honda engineers started with the Civic’s body. First, the new 10th-generation Civic is stronger and lighter than the previous car, but second, the Type R gets 42.7 feet of structural adhesive in high-stress areas that are simply not present in the standard Civic Hatchback. This leads to a 12 percent increase in lateral rigidity.

Mounted to the unibody is the Type R’s four-wheel independent suspension. Out back, the suspension remains very similar to the standard Civic’s, though it has unique active dampers, thicker anti-roll bars, and is 1.2 inches wider. Up front is where the magic really happens.

Behind a front-wheel-drive car, Honda had to overcome the Type R’s prodigious 306 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque from inducing unwanted torque steer – the effect of the engine’s power turning the steering wheel via drive force applied to the front tires. Honda uses what’s called a dual-axis front strut in order to counter this. Basically, the mountings for the front hubs are much closer to the hub and further away from the MacPherson strut tower. Aluminum knuckles help reduce unsprung weight while a thicker, 29mm anti-roll bar adds more control in hard cornering.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729272
“The front track is also 2.0 inches wider and the 245/30ZR20 summer-performance tires are an inch wider than the standard Civic’s equipment”

The front track is also 2.0 inches wider and the 245/30ZR20 summer-performance tires are an inch wider than the standard Civic’s equipment. That’s what necessitates the Type R’s widened bodywork.

As for the springs, the Type R uses coil springs with a spring rate 1.6 times greater than the stock car, while the anti-roll bar is 2.4 times more rigid. Even the bushings that hold everything together are nearly two times as firm. The Type R’s silver bullet is its Adaptive Damper System. The ADS has three firmness settings that correspond to the Type R’s three drive modes. The modes are Comfort, Sport, and +R. Each has their place and is dramatically different than the other.

Comfort mode is best suited for the street. It softens the dampers making imperfections in the road more bearable. The throttle is less twitchy and slightly more pedal travel is needed to spur the engine on. Sport mode is the driver’s choice for twisty roads. The throttle instantly becomes more responsive, the suspension is more ridges for better body control, and the entire car just feels more aggressive. When in +R mode, those Sport-mode attributes are multiplied 10 fold. It’s the mode best reserved for the track, especially since the adaptive dampers feel like they’ve been replaced with unbendable steel beams. The Type R in +R mode feels ridiculously nimble. Much of that can be attributed to the car’s 3,110-pound curb weight and super sticky tires.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729293
“The Type R in +R mode feels ridiculously nimble.”

On the track, we found the Type R to only exhibit very mild and predictable understeer only at the limit. Otherwise, the car tracks straight and true, offering a fun-filled and safe driving experience. Adding to that is the lightweight clutch and silky smooth six-speed shifter.

Hitting the Brakes


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729278
“Big Brembo calipers with four pistons grab 13.8-inch drilled rotors”

The Type R is impressively good at stopping, too. The front brakes are vastly upgraded over the standard Civic’s binders. Big Brembo calipers with four pistons grab 13.8-inch drilled rotors. (The stock rotors only measure 11.1 inches in diameter.) Under-body cooling vents direct air to the front brakes for long-lasting performance. Out back, the Civic’s 10.2-inch solid rotors are upgraded to 12.0-inch discs, though a single-piston caliper is still used. Combined, the brakes haul the Civic Type R from 60 mph to a full stop in an utterly short 99 feet.
And for those wondering, the sprint back to 60 mph only takes 5.4 seconds thanks to the Type R’s wonderful 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder.

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719399

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R

The Honda Civic Type R is powered by a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder constructed from aluminum. It uses Honda’s proven VTEC system to phase the timing of the 16 overhead valves. Rotational mass is kept down thanks to sodium-filled exhaust valves and lightweight pistons. A short blip of the throttle will have the 2.0-liter screaming at its 7,000-rpm redline in very short order. Thankfully, redline isn’t required for making peak horsepower. All 306 galloping ponies are in full stampede at 6,500 rpm and the 295 pound-feet of torque peak at only 2,500 rpm but stays through 4,500 rpm.

Temperatures are kept in check by an intercooler, a radiator, and four separate inlets into the engine bay. The lowest inlet in the grille chills the turbo’s intercooler while the space below the Honda H directs air to the engine’s radiator. The upper slot just below the hood is what feeds fresh air into the intake. Last but not least, the hood scoop is used to push cool air down the backside of the engine while relieving positive air pressure under the hood and thereby reducing lift.

More cooling happens via the oil jets that squirt the underside of the piston and the water-cooled, two-piece exhaust manifold. As for those oil jets, they not only cool the pistons and cylinder walls, they also provide a constant flow of lubrication.

After air leaves the unique exhaust manifold, it travels down a single exhaust pipe. Behind the rear axle, the pipe forks off into three seconds. The outer pipes go to large mufflers, while the center pipe feeds a resonator. The three each feel their own exhaust tip in the center of the bumper. Honda says the center resonator is used to control mid-rev booming inside the cabin, while the outer mufflers move vast amounts of air at high speeds. Interestingly, the center resonator actually generates negative pressure at higher revs. The result is a snarling yet not overbearing exhaust note – both from inside and outside the car.

Read our full, driven review of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.

Continue reading for charts and stats.

Drivetrain Specifications


The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 729258
Engine Type Turbocharged In-Line 4-Cylinder
Turbocharger Single-Scroll MHI TD04 with Internal Wastegate
Boost Pressure 22.8 psi
Displacement (cc) 1,996
Horsepower (SAE net) 306 HP @ 6,500 RPM
Torque (SAE net) 295 LB-FT @ 2,500-4,500 RPM
Fuel economy (City/Highway/Combined) (mpg) 22 / 28 / 25
Curb Weight (lbs.) 3,117
0 to 60 mph 4.9 seconds
Quarter-mile 13.5 seconds at 108 mph
Top Speed 169 mph

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719399

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon Watch How Honda Manages Air on the 2017 Civic Type R

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R has made massive waves in the hot hatch segment since its launch midyear. The Type R blazes its own trail with a different map that Ford and Subaru use for their Focus RS and WRX STI. The Honda lacks a fancy AWD system, drift mode, or some expensive Recaro or Sparco branded seats. Rather, Honda focused on reducing mass and aerodynamics. The aero work is clearly seen when looking at the car, but there’s more to the story than just tall spoilers and big intakes.

Rob Keough with Honda Civic Product Planning goes into deep detail on all the Type R’s aerodynamic surfaces and cooling ductwork in this five-minute video from Honda. Keough goes through the visual tour of the car’s thermal package first, showing the three separate intakes for the intercooler, radiator, and engine air intake. The hood-mounted scoop then channels air down and out of the engine bay. This not only helps relieve air pressure, but also reduces lift on the front wheels. A hidden air duct below the fog lights help cool the front brakes.

Around back, the wing is positioned high enough to not block rear visibility yet is thin enough to not cause any undue drag. Its angle and shape are positioned to create downforce at higher speeds, aided by vortex generators along the rear of the roof. Honda says the Type R has a drag coefficient of 0.26, which is incredibly low. By comparison, the Bugatti Chiron has a drag coefficient of .35 in its Top Speed mode. Yeah…

Of course, aerodynamics are only a part of the 2017 Civic Type R’s story. We’ll have more Type R content this week as we’ve got one in the driveway. Feel free to ask questions in the comments and we’ll answer them.

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719399

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


2017 Honda Civic Type R – Driven - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon No More Ludicrous Prices: 2018 Honda Civic Type R Goes On Sale

2018 Honda Civic Hits Dealers in Full Force

The Honda Civic Type R was finally launched in the United States in 2017 (for the first time in 20 years) and caused lots of chaos at dealerships, which had to cope with incredible demand for very low supply. The first run was preordered in a matter of hours, and many dealers tried to speculate and used all sorts of tricks to up the sticker. Some of those who preordered a Type R tried to resell their orders at higher prices too, sometimes well in excess of $70,000. But it looks like all these shenanigans may finally be over, as the 2018-model-year Civic Type R went on sale in the United States.

The beefed-up hatchback retails from $34,100, excluding the $890 destination charge and other costs. Definitely much better than the $50,000 sticker some dealerships were asking, or the $80,000+ some nut jobs were trying to score by selling their preorders. The only bad news here is that demand is so high that there may still be a long waiting line at dealerships, but the ordering and delivery process should become easier in a couple of months. On a related note, the Type R turbocharged engine is now also available as a crate engine for amateur and professional race team through the company’s motorsport division.

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719343

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.



Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon You Can Have the Honda Civic Type R Crate Engine For $6.5K

For years, Honda enthusiasts in the United States watched with envy as Europe and Asia had access to the awesome, beefed-up Civic Type R. Launched in 1997, the Type R remained a forbidden fruit for U.S. gearheads for decades. Two decades to be more specific, as the high-performance Civic didn’t cross the pond to North America until 2017. And, needless to say, it created the utmost hype, with backed-up preorders and crazy price speculation over to-be-delivered cars. With the hatchback finally on its way to customers, Honda has more good news for Type R fans: the turbocharged 2.0-liter powerplant is now available as a crate engine.

The big announcement was made at the 2017 SEMA Show, where Honda confirmed that enthusiasts would be able to purchase the Type R engine through Honda Performance Development’s Honda Racing Line program. The crate engine is rated at the same 306 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque as the one in the road car. The turbocharged four-banger is priced at $6,519.87, but here is a catch: it’s only available for “verified, closed-course racing applications,” which means it can’t be used in road-going models.

Continue reading for the full story.

Why It Matters?


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719399
“This crate engine is great news for both amateur and professional racing drivers alike”

On top of being an appealing car of regular drivers, the Civic Type R was also seen as a great engine source by racing enthusiasts. So, this crate engine is great news for both amateur and professional racing drivers alike, who finally have access to Honda’s most powerful engine in the United States. It’s also reliable, which makes things that much better on the race track. With Honda Racing Line involved in the project, drivers will also benefit from something similar to factory support, which is way better than just sourcing an engine and trying to make it work by doing your own research and development.

The Bad News


2016 Honda Civic - image 651097
“If you were dreaming of building your own Type R version of the Civic sedan, the Accord, or any other Honda available in showrooms, it won't happen anytime soon”

Unfortunately, this engine isn’t yet available for road cars. So if you were dreaming of building your own Type R version of the Civic sedan, the Accord, or any other Honda available in showrooms, it won’t happen anytime soon. Sure, it could be offered outside the Honda Racing Line program in the future, but it will be tricky to install this engine in a production model and get it homologated for road use. So yeah, this announcement is somewhat disappointing when it comes to road cars, but at least we’ll see more of this fantastic engine on race tracks across the United States!

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719343

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


2017 SEMA Show – Preview - image 741107

Read more news on the 2017 SEMA Show.

PostHeaderIcon Honda Odyssey Type R

There’s no harder transition in the world than for a car guy to move away from his prized bachelor car to daily drive a mom-mobile, aka the dreaded minivan. So, what happens when you want the best of both worlds? Well, you convince Honda to build you a Honda Odyssey Type R. Is it crazy? Sure. But are you going to tell me you would pass up an Odyssey Type R to drive a Chrysler Pacifica, Toyota Sienna, Kia Sedona, or a Mercedes Metris? I doubt it, and you know why? Because this thing is intense in all the right ways. You get all of the Type R goodies, including things like the Championship White paint, Type R wheels and body kit, and even the classic Type R red accents inside. But, what will power a beast like this? Well, we’ll discuss that in a bit.

So here we are, talking about something as crazy as an Odyssey Type R. All the goodness of the ultimate people hauler paired with the aggressiveness, style, and clout of the Type R badge, plus more than enough power to keep you from sacrificing your manhood on days when you have to tote the family around. So with that said, let’s dive in and speculate a bit about the Honda Odyssey Type R and why Honda should greenlight a project like this. You know it will appeal to the tuner and gearhead in all of us.

Exterior


2020 Honda Odyssey Type R - image 733296

I was at the 2017 Detroit Auto Show when Honda pulled the covers off of the Honda Odyssey. It was literally a show stopper. Across the way was the new Chevy Traverse. It was a beautiful ride, and as a photographer, I had to get good shots of it. Of course, there was so much excitement around the Traverse that I had to circle around a few times before I got my chance to pull the trigger on my Camera. A few hours later, it was just about time for Honda to kick off the show and, while I expected it to be a busy debut, I didn’t expect it to be so outrageously popular. If I didn’t know better, I would say everyone at the show had to come over and check out the new Odyssey.

“Naturally, the Type R Odyssey has to rock out the same styling as the Civic Type R, and we’ve got it all”

Naturally, I did what I could to take pictures, but hours passed and I couldn’t even get close – even playing my usual photographer tricks to get up in there ahead of the crowd. Eventually, the day was over, and security was set to drag me out. So, I had to return to the show the next day to check out what all the hype was about. Well, I was nice and early, so I finally got a good look and man was I impressed. I knew right then that we needed to render up a Type R Odyssey, and here we are.


2020 Honda Odyssey Type R - image 733294

Naturally, the Type R Odyssey has to rock out the same styling as the Civic Type R, and we’ve got it all. We’ve got the gloss black grille up front, the red Honda emblem, the Type R emblem and those big vents in the corners that also serve as home to the big fog lamps because this is still a family car, right? To round off the front end, we threw in a scoop on the hood and the spoiler up front, complete with the red pinstripe. Moving to the sides, we’ve swapped out the standard mirrors for gloss black units to go along with the window trim. The fender vent is another nice touch that really stands out above those Type R wheels. New side skirts with a red stripe and black door handles round out the exterior package.

“The rear fascia gets a diffuser element that wraps around the edges to tie the sides to the rear, and twin, and a triple exhaust outlet screams Type R music on take off.”

Around back is where it really gets interesting, though. See, we’ve managed to modify the Civic Type R’s spoiler so that it can mount to the rear hatch, and it looks pretty mean. The rear fascia gets a diffuser element that wraps around the edges to tie the sides to the rear together and a triple exhaust outlet screams Type R music on take-off. Finally, we blacked out all of the rear windows and the moonroof to give it that midnight look, which somehow looks really good against that Champion White finish. And, don’t forget about the red calipers down below – you’ve got to have the red calipers!

Interior


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 708056
“On the inside, you know Honda would blend the perfect balance of family functionality and Type R goodness”

On the inside, you know Honda would blend the perfect balance of family functionality and Type R goodness. The first things to get swapped out are the front seats, the instrument cluster, and the infotainment display. All three from the Civic Type R carry right over, with some minor modification to the dash to support the different electronics. A new center console is thrown into place to allow for the six-speed gear shifter – that’s right, it’s not a Type R without a six-speed. The dash is adorned with black leather and Red piping, while the Type R steering wheel gets the traditional red emblem to go with the red inserts in the bottom half. Aluminum pedals are added to the floor – yes all three – and the Type R racing seats replace the standard seats up front. Thanks to Honda’s engineering genius, all of that family functionality carries over, including the rear cabin monitor, reverse camera, and DVD player. Type R floor mats round out the front of the cabin.


2018 Honda Odyssey - image 718504
Honda Odyssey – second row shot

Around back, all of the trim is replaced with higher quality materials so that this funky minivan carries the Type R legacy correctly. When the doors open automatically, a bright red ambient light illuminates the ground while displaying a Honda emblem and the Type R logo. The outboard seats in the second row look almost identical to the seats up front, including the excessive bolster support and holes for the five-point racing harnesses – that’s right, you can take the whole family down the strip in this bad boy. The center seat remains and is easily removable just as it is in the standard version. It carries over unchanged in design but gets the same red and black layout with Type R embroidery for consistency.


2018 Honda Odyssey - image 702281
Honda Odyssey – third row shot
“When the doors open automatically, a bright red ambient light illuminates the ground while displaying a Honda emblem and the Type R logo”

The third row carries over unchanged and features the same amount of support as seen in the standard model, but in this case, they are also wrapped in red and black and feature that Type R logo. The entertainment center in the rear has been replaced with a slightly larger screen that also has Type R graphics as expected and the trim panels by the third row get backlit Type R logos (red of course) from front to rear. A large Type R floor mat is placed ahead of the second and third rows while a special Type R cargo mat can be found in the rear cargo area. When the rear hatch opens, a red Honda logo is projected above the Type R lettering to complete the interior package. Tell me you wouldn’t feel at home in this thing. Go ahead; I’ll wait.

Drivetrain


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719407

Now, this is where things really get interesting. If you know Honda, you’re probably thinking that this is where it will drop in that 2.0-liter from the Type R, right? 306 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque would be an improvement over the standard 3.5-liter V-6 with 280 ponies and 262 pound-feet, but it’s not quite good enough for a vehicle this heavy. After all, if it’s wearing that Type R badge, it needs to live up to a legacy and rewrite the definition of quick. As such, that 2.0-liter stays where it belongs in the smaller car, and instead, Honda is going to tap into its luxury arm, and take advantage of that 3.5-liter twin-turbo V-6 from the Acura NSX. Of course, it won’t deliver the full 500 horsepower and 406 pound-feet of torque, but it will be detuned to deliver 445 horsepower and 373 pound-feet of twist – and the Odyssey Type R comes to life.

“Honda is going to tap into its luxury arm, and take advantage of that 3.5-liter twin-turbo V-6 from the Acura NSX”

Of course, this is a different setup, so it doesn’t get the AWD hybrid system, but a simple adapter plate allows for that six-speed trans to bolt right up, and with the right modification of the chassis the engine can be positioned far enough to one side so that it will fit under the hood – it’s just a very tight fit. But, hey, that’s okay when you’ve got a 445-horsepower Odyssey, right? Finally, the dual air intakes have been repositioned to suck air directly from the vents in the corners of the front fascia for a true, CAI system. The end result is a minivan that can make the 60-mph sprint in a matter of 4.1 seconds, while top speed sits at an insane 186 mph.


2020 Honda Odyssey Type R - image 733295

As far as suspension goes, the Odyssey Type R will get a standard MacPherson setup up front and a double-wishbone system out back with double lower control arms for better stability at high speeds. The suspension itself is dropped by just over an inch to provide better aerodynamics. Active traction control keeps the wheels from breaking loose on take-off while electromechanical brakes handle braking duties. Sounds pretty wild for a minivan huh? Well, here’s the cool part. Honda knows your wife doesn’t need to be doing a 180 mph to get little Tommy to his football practice or Molly to her band recital, so “Dad’s” key unlocks the Odyssey’s full potential, while ”Mom’s” key limits output to just 280 horsepower.

Pricing


2020 Honda Odyssey Type R - image 733293

As you’re well aware, that Type R badge comes at a price, and we’re not talking about a few extra bones here, either. The standard range-topping model. The “Elite” commands $46,670, so you can expect the Odyssey Type R to set you back by at least $56,000, but hey that’s okay – we’re talking about the most powerful type R in existence as of the time of this writing. Good luck getting the wife to approve, but we are talking about a family car here, so sweet talk her a little, will ya?

Competition

At this point, there’s nothing that would really compete with an Odyssey Type R, so it would sit in a niche all its own and would likely inspire a whole swath of high-performance minivans to come to light. Until then, your only option would be to go with the range-topping version of the Toyota Sienna, Chrysler Pacifica, or Kia Sedona, none of which offer up anywhere near as cool a setup as the Odyssey with Type R treatment. But, let’s look anyway…

Chrysler Pacifica Hellcat


2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hellcat - image 668902

Of course, we once speculated that Chrysler would put together a Pacifica Hellcat, so that’s most definitely the No. 1 competitor for the Odyssey Type R. Featuring a more aggressive look on the outside it will also get the Hellcat independent rear suspension, and will, in fact, be all-wheel drive. This, of course, requires the removal of the stow-n-go seating to make way for the transmission tunnel, but hey, that’s a pretty fair trade-off, right? All seats will get Nappa leather and Alcantara trimmings to go with Hellcat embroidery, and you can bet it’ll come complete with the special crate in the rear as well.

Under the hood will sit the supercharged 6.2-liter V-8 and is actually positioned in a front-mid-ship location to allow for an all-wheel-drive up front. All told, it will deliver 707 horsepower and 650 pound-feet like a true Hellcat but will be able to hit 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds. Yikes – I guess that will top the Odyssey Type R, huh? Of course, it’ll also start out a bit higher at around $70,000, so you’ll be paying a little extra for the AWD and V-8 lineup.

Read our full speculative review on the Chrysler Pacifica Hellcat.

Toyota Sienna Limited


2018 Toyota Sienna - image 711005

2018 Toyota Sienna - image 711006

This is the range-topping trim of the Toyota Sienna. The Sienna doesn’t even compete in looks really as it’s got a fairly boring exterior look, but it does offer seating for eight, LED running lights, Blue Ray infotainment system, a JBL audio system with integrated navigation and app access, leather seating, and a smart key system. Under the hood, you find a 3.5-liter that’s good for 296 horsepower and 263 pound-feet of torque, nowhere near what you get with an Odyssey Type R but not bad for your normal back and forth driving. An eight-speed auto controls shifting duties while AWD with active torque control makes driving in rough weather even easier. The range-topping model in this lineup, the Limited Premium AWD, starts out at $47,310, really putting it close to the theoretical price of the Odyssey Type R.

Read our full review on the Toyota Sienna Limited

Kia Sedona SXL


2015 Kia Sedona - image 548816

2015 Kia Sedona - image 548819

The Sedona is the only one of the three competing models that offers a truly similar look to the Odyssey, as it has that zig-zag waistline, too. The model you would need to shoot for to compete with an Odyssey Type R is the SXL trim, which resides at the top of the lineup. The cool thing about the SXL is that it rides separately in the looks department, thanks to a sportier front and rear fascia as well as sleeker fog lights too. It also stands out by means of larger and sportier wheels.

Inside it gets an eight-inch infotainment system with phone connectivity via Android Auto and Apple CarPlay to go with an eight-speaker audio system that features an external amp and eight-inch subwoofer – we’ll just call this the 888 package. Essentially a fully loaded model, the SXL includes all of Kia’s advanced safety systems, and can even be options with Nappa leather upholstery and first-class seating.

Under the hood, you’ll find a 3.3-liter V-6 that’s good for 276 horsepower and 248 pound-feet of torque and efficient enough to offer up 19 mpg combined. Pricing starts out at $41,900 but easily climbs closer to $50,000 with all the right options.

Read our full review on the Kia Sedona SXL.

Conclusion


2020 Honda Odyssey Type R - image 732980

Let’s be honest, the chances of Honda actually coming out with an Odyssey are pretty damn slim, let alone one that totes around the NSX’s twin-turbo engine. Even if Honda moved forward with a Type R version of the Odyssey, it would get that same 2.0-liter found in the Civic Type R, but hey, this was about speculating and having fun, so I went all out. And, you have to admit that it would be awesome minivan to drive around if you had to drive a minivan right?

On a side note, we once speculated that Chrysler would come up with a Hellcat version of the Pacifica, and of course, that was shot down a long time ago. But, if Honda came out with a Type R, Chrysler wouldn’t have much of a choice, now would they? So, at the end of the day, we need to convince one brand to take a leap of faith so that the other will. Just imagine a time where you and the wife both daily drive minivans with extreme looks and power – now that would be kind of fun, don’t you think?

So, tell me what you think about the Odyssey Type R. How would you want Honda to configure it? More power, less power, or just as I’ve described? Would you want a true-to-life six-speed or would you prefer the dual-clutch automatic transmission with shift paddles from the NSX? Let us know in the comments section below!

  • Leave it
    • Will probably never happen
    • Chrysler would kill it with the Hellcat Pacifica
    • Even if it did happen, it would never get a true manual transmission

References

Honda Odyssey


2018 Honda Odyssey - image 718512

Read our full review on the Honda Odyssey.

Honda Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719420

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Type R.

Honda Accord Type R


2019 Honda Accord Type R - image 728542

Read our full speculative review on the Honda Accord Type R.

PostHeaderIcon Flogging The 2017 Honda Civic Type R

It doesn’t get hotter than the 2017 Honda Civic Type R – at least this month. That comes as no surprise since the Type R is just now making its debut in the U.S. after decades of devouring foreign roads in markets worldwide. This performance variant is based on the 10th-generation Civic, a compact car with a pedigree that needs no explanation. Honda wanted me to give the new Type R a swing, so they flew me to Seattle, Washington for some seat time in those heavily bolstered front buckets on winding mountain roads and through all 16 corners of The Ridge Motorsports Park just north of Olympia.

The Civic Type R arrives amidst a raging fight in the hot hatch segment. The Ford Focus RS and its ridiculous powertrain and Drift Mode square up against the dethroned champion, the Volkswagen Golf R and the rally-bred Subaru WRX STI. What these competitors all have in common are four cylinders being force-fed via turbochargers, six-speed manual transmissions, and AWD. Tit for tat, these compact brawlers are mostly equal – save for the Focus RS’ extra horsepower and the Civic Type R’s lack of AWD. Wait, what? Yep, Honda ditched the idea of a heavy, complex, and parasitic AWD system in favor of a lighter curb weight, a limited slip differential, and its dual-axis front MacPherson struts. The result is a 3,100-pound car that hangs with its toughest competitor despite its 44-horsepower, 55-pound-foot disadvantage.

Continue reading for my on-track driving impressions.

PostHeaderIcon Honda Accord Type R

There’s no denying that Honda has been pretty stingy when it comes to the Type R badge and the U.S. Market. Over the years, U.K., Euro, and Japanese markets always seemed to get the best that Honda had to offer, with the Type R badge being applied to the first-generation Acura NSX, Acura Integra, the Honda Accord and, of course, the Honda Civic. Of all these, the only models we saw come to the U.S. were the NSX Type R and the Integra Type R, both sporting Acura Badges, and we finally got the Civic Type R for the 2017 model year. With that in mind, it’s been a while since the world got a Type R version of the Accord, so we decided to render up was a U.S.-Spec Accord Type R would look like. Highlights of the build would include more aggressive fascias out front with Type R specific styling to go with plenty of Type R goodness inside. There would, of course, be an improved output over the range-topping model’s 252 ponies, but how that power will come to be is another story. Other necessities include a stiffer suspension, manual transmission, tuned-out exhaust, and a lower ride height.

On the plus side, all of the necessary prerequisites are already in play. The new Accord is pretty sporty on its own, so a more aggressive look should be easily welcomed. But, with the range-topping models of the Accord already sporting the detuned version of the Civic Type R’s 2.0-liter four-cylinder, it won’t take much to get some extra power to the wheels. Even more intriguing is the fact that Accord Sport models with the 2.0-liter can be equipped with a six-speed manual if you check the right option box, so you’ll be able to forgo dealing with that new 10-speed auto gearbox. With all of that in mind, let’s talk a little about the Accord Type R’s history and then take a good look at our rendering. Are you excited? I sure am. Let’s get to it…

PostHeaderIcon Honda Civic Type R Gets The One Republic Treatment

Yes, you’re reading that right. The Honda Civic Type R, the purveyor of hot hatch madness, just received a styling overhaul courtesy of One Republic, the American band that’s responsible for hit songs like “Apologize,” “Counting Stars,” and “Secret.” It seems like an ideal match from a popularity standpoint, and to the surprise of many, the finished product actually looks pretty good, save for a few complaints. Can’t have everything, can you, One Republic?

The one-off Civic Type R is actually part of Honda’s 2017 Honda Civic Tour where fans of the model will get a chance to see what’s new and cracking in the world of the Civic. One Republic has been tapped to headline this tour and that explains why Honda asked the band to design their own stylistic interpretation of the hot hatch. This is the result and, well, I actually like it. It’s not obnoxious in any way and the use of the matte black and red accents was done in a way that they don’t take away from the things that make the Civic Type R the desirable piece of machinery that it is. Whether you agree with me or not, we will get to see more of the One Republic-designed Honda Civic Type R in the coming months as it embarks on a cross-country tour in the U.S. alongside a custom Honda Rebel motorcycle that was also designed by the band.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

PostHeaderIcon Honda Shows up to Goodwood with a Unique interpretation of the Civic Type R

We all know that human and machine are becoming one. People can’t put down their smartphones for two seconds, Grandpa is walking around with a pacemaker to keep his heart going, and it’s only a matter of time before we’re able to replace our limbs with full-fledged robotic counterparts. Elon Musk is even doubling down on his notion of connecting the human brain directly to computers with his newest company, Neuralink. It’s only a matter of time before we can transfer human consciousness and become a race of sentient cyborg beings hellbent on spreading our archaic ideals across the galaxy and conquering the universe. Okay, so, that’s a bit too much, but there’s no denying that the gap between human and machine is getting increasingly smaller, and Honda has taken this idea into its own hands by creating a Honda Civic Type R and the Fireblade bike out of humans. That’s right; Humans.

It’s all a big show to celebrate the kicking off of this year’s Goodwood Festival of Speed, and you have to admit, it’s one of the most creative ways to do so. All told, 12 performance artists manage to intertwine themselves enough to generate the basic silhouette of the Civic Type R and the Fireblade bike. The whole thing has been orchestrated by the Honda Challenge Lab, a self-proclaimed “playground of extraordinary ideas inspiring curiosity and learning.” Needless to say, if you happen to be checking out the festival this year, the Honda booth is one place you certainly want to visit – it’s not very often you see a group of people shaping themselves into vehicles.

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End Date: Saturday May-25-2019 9:53:52 PDT
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1965 Ford Mustang coupe 1965 Ford mustang
$16,500.00
End Date: Friday Jun-7-2019 16:23:17 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $16,500.00
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2011 Ford Mustang GT 2011 Ford Mustang GT
$1.00 (0 Bids)
End Date: Saturday May-25-2019 7:30:55 PDT
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1970 Ford Mustang 2 door 1970 Ford mustang Fastback
$15,088.00 (16 Bids)
End Date: Tuesday May-21-2019 7:43:47 PDT
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1966 Ford Mustang GT 1966 Ford Mustang GT A Code 289 Four Speed Disc Brakes Factory Color Combo
$20,000.00 (0 Bids)
End Date: Saturday May-25-2019 10:35:08 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $39,995.00
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1967 Chevrolet C-10 Fleetside ORIGINAL LOW MILES, RECENT RESTORATION, V8, AUTO, PWR STEERING, PWR BRAKES!
$16,900.00
End Date: Friday May-24-2019 13:40:22 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $16,900.00
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