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Archive for the ‘Honda’ Category

PostHeaderIcon Honda Brings Together Consortium of Tech Startups To Focus on Future Mobility

In case it isn’t obvious by now, the Consumer Electronics Show attracted just about every automaker that has a vested interest in future mobility. Honda was in attendance at the event, where it announced plans through Honda Xcelerator to bring together a consortium of tech startups with the goal of developing new technologies that are geared towards future mobility. Included in this list of startups are BRAIQ, DeepMap, DynaOptics, EXO Technologies, Tactual Labs, and WayRay.


Honda Brings Together Consortium of Tech Startups To Focus on Future Mobility
- image 756975
“Honda’s goal in partnering with BRAIQ is to one day personalise its own Adaptive Cruise Control system to improve trust in autonomous driving technology”

Each of the six startups brings something different to the table. BRAIQ, for example, is a company that focuses on developing technologies for the autonomous vehicle space, specifically through the collection of biometric information that it can analyze to add what it describes as a “layer of emotional intelligence on top of artificial intelligence.” Honda’s goal in partnering with BRAIQ is to one day personalise its own Adaptive Cruise Control system to improve trust in autonomous driving technology. For its part, DynaOptics’ service revolves around state-of-the-art optic lenses. The Singapore-based startup is known for its free-form optic lenses that work better than traditional lenses in certain specifications. Honda’s tapping into that ability to improve its own light-to-camera sensors.

Honda’s goal of improving its own GPS service is a big reason why it’s bringing startups DeepMaps and EXO Technologies into the fold. DeepMaps is based in
California, and it provides high-definition (HD) maps and real-time localization as a service to autonomous vehicles. As it is, the company is building a cloud-based, scalable platform that can create 3D HD maps for autonomous cars equipped with Level 4 and Level 5 autonomy. Meanwhile, Israel-based EXO Technologies provides its own brand of GPS solutions that focus on improving in-car navigation among autonomous vehicles. These two partnerships fall in line with Honda’s plan to take its GPS service to a level that can be used by autonomous vehicles.


Honda Brings Together Consortium of Tech Startups To Focus on Future Mobility
- image 756979
“PRISMä technology is capable of wrapping a free-form object in accurate in-air, skeletal, and contact sensing and construct the human hand and body in 3D”

Another startup, Tactual Labs, has been brought into the fold by Honda because of the startup’s PRISMä technology. This tech feature is capable of wrapping a free-form object in accurate in-air, skeletal, and contact sensing and construct the human hand and body in 3D. Honda’s collaboration with the Toronto-based company is tied into its plan to create a new and smarter user interface that can provide drivers increased functionality while inside their cars or aboard their motorcycles.

Then there’s WayRay, a Swiss developer of a holographic augmented reality (AR) navigation system for cars, giving us an idea of Honda Xcelerator’s plans with this partnership. One of WayRay’s calling cards is its Holographic AR, a display device that can turn a car’s windshield into a window of information that’s capable of displaying multicolored virtual objects. The tech is compact in size, but it is capable of creating a fully-featured, non-wearable augmented reality infotainment system that can serve multiple functions, including detection of road obstacles and pedestrians, displaying points of interest, or alerting the driver to hazards. In other words, Honda wants to go Minority Report on all of us.

References


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.


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Read more CES news.


HondaLens Augmented Reality - The Future of the Dealership Experience - image 749046

Read more technology news.

PostHeaderIcon Honda Insight

Introduced in late 1999, the Honda Insight was the first production to feature the company’s then-new Integrated Motor Assist system. It was also the first hybrid launched in North America, arriving in showrooms seven months before the Toyota Prius. Production ended in 2006, after only 17,020 units built, with plans to roll out a replacement in 2009. The second-gen model arrived on time, but this time as a five-door hatchback. The Insight was discontinued for the second time in 2014, mostly due to slow sales. Come 2018 and Honda wants to revive the nameplate with a modern design and drivetrain, and a pre-production prototype is set to break cover at the Detroit Auto Show.

“The Honda Insight is anticipated to receive fuel economy ratings competitive with the best hybrids in the segment, with styling that will have universal appeal inside and out and best-in-class passenger volume,” said Henio Arcangeli Jr., senior vice resident of American Honda. The redesigned Insight will join four other electrified Hondas, including the Clarity Plug-in Hybrid, Electric, and Fuel Cell, and the Fit EV. Most specs are still being kept under wraps, but Honda did unveil a few details about the car’s design and technology. Let’s find out more about it in the review below. And remember to stay tuned for an update from the 2018 Detroit Auto Show.

Continue reading to learn more about the Honda Insight.

Exterior

  • Employs Honda’s new styling language
  • New, sleek fastback design
  • Muscular fenders
  • LED lights
  • Production-ready body

2019 Honda Insight - image 757611
“The side view is a bit more generic than the exotic-looking Clarity”

The new Insight was designed around the company’s recent styling language, so it looks pretty familiar, especially when compared to the new Clarity and the Accord. The angular headlamps, the large grille that’s narrower at the bottom, and the aggressive bumper vents are features we can find on several other Honda models. On the other hand, the grille has a unique design with the “flying wing” insert placed at the top and running into the headlamps.

The side view is a bit more generic than the exotic-looking Clarity, in the sense that it doesn’t have the sharp beltline running through the door handles. However, the Insight benefits from significantly more muscular fenders front and rear and a swoopy beltline that makes it stand out.


2019 Honda Insight - image 753494
“Honda went with a fastback sedan design for the new Insight”

The rear is a significant departure from the previous generations. While both its predecessors had hatchback configurations, Honda went with a fastback sedan design for the new Insight. The roof become sleek as it descends toward the rear fascia, while the decklid is rather short. But unlike most modern fastbacks, there’s no tailgate.

The rear fascia itself looks modern and fresh. The taillights are large and have sizable LED strips, but become narrower on the trunk lid. The small spoiler integrated above adds a bit of character. The rear bumper is as simple as they get, but the black insert with chrome trim in the lower area gives the Insight a sportier feel. Overall, it’s an exciting design that integrates the Insight into current Honda lineup.

Interior

  • Clean dashboard design
  • 8-inch infotainment screen
  • Digital instrument cluster
  • Premium features
  • Optional leather seats
  • Optional Apple CarPlay and Android Auto
  • New driver-assist features

2019 Honda Insight - image 753491
“The interior looks familiar and shares some features with existing Honda models”

High-resolution photos of the cabin aren’t yet available, but Honda did release a couple of renderings. Much like the exterior, the interior looks familiar and shares some features with existing Honda models, but it does have a few unique styling cues. The dashboard is particularly interesting, with the A/C vents in the center stack and on the passenger side connected by a slim black and chrome strip. Not only it gives the cabin a premium look, but it also gives it a more organic, two-tier layout. The eight-inch infotainment screen is position just below the center A/C vents, with more controls underneath. The configuration is clean and uncluttered and follows current trends.

The steering wheel has a somewhat flat bottom and a few controls for both hands. The digital, seven-inch instrument cluster looks modern too and includes features specific to hybrid models.


2019 Honda Insight - image 753492
“The longer wheelbase will make the new sedan the roomiest Insight yet”

Honda says that the new Insight will have many premium features. However, things perforated leather seating, Apple CarPlay, and Andoid Auto will be optional. It also promises smartphone-like features and functionality plus customizable app tiles and home-screen shortcuts for the new infotainment system. The Wi-Fi-enabled over-the-air system updates should make updating the unit a breeze.

Tech-wise, it will also include Honda LaneWatch on EX and above trims and Honda Sensing suite of advanced safety and driver-assistance technologies as standard equipment. The latter will add Collision Mitigation Braking System, Lane Departure Warning, Road Departure Mitigation, Adaptive Cruise Control with Low-Speed Follow, and new Traffic Sign Recognition.

The longer wheelbase will also make the new sedan the roomiest Insight yet. Honda claims it will provide class-leading passenger space and a full-size trunk thanks to the batteries being located under the rear seats. 60/40 split rear seats are available on the options list.

Drivetrain

  • 1.5-liter Atkinson-cycle engine
  • Lithium-ion battery pack
  • New electric motor
  • Combined mileage of 50 mpg
  • Class-leading output

2019 Honda Insight - image 753496
“Honda claims that the Insight will deliver class-leading power”

There aren’t many drivetrain details to run by as of this writing, but Honda claims that the Insight will deliver class-leading power. This isn’t hard to achieve though, as the competition isn’t overly powerful. While the Toyota Prius has a total system output of 121 horsepower, the Chevy Volt provides 149 horses and the Hyundai Ioniq cranks out 139 horsepower.

As for fuel economy, Honda anticipates a combined mileage of 50 mpg. This figure puts it below the Prius’ 56 mpg and the Ioniq’s 58 mpg, but above the Volt’s 46 mpg.

Motivation is provided by Honda’s third-gen two-motor hybrid system, which includes a 1.5-liter Atkinson-cycle engine and lithium-ion battery pack. Specs aren’t yet available, but I’ll be back with an update from the 2018 Detroit Auto Show.

Prices


2019 Honda Insight - image 753497

Pricing is still a mystery right now and it’s been too long since Honda had an Insight model in showroom to attempt an estimate. But it’s safe to assume that it won’t be significantly more expensive than the Toyota Prius and the Hyundai Ioniq. With the two priced from $23,475 and $22,200, respectively, the Honda Insight should fetch less than $25,000 before incentives and options.

Competition

Toyota Prius


2016 Toyota Prius - image 738361

Introduced for the 2016 model year, the latest-generation Toyota Prius is already almost three years old. And unlike the Insight, it still sports a unique design that sets it apart from any other Toyota out there. And it’s still a hatchback by design. The interior looks pretty high-tech too, and the centered instrument cluster enhances this feeling. The Prius uses the same 1.8-liter, Atkinson-cycle as its predecessor, but the unit is now more efficient thanks to numerous upgrades. It also features a new exhaust gas recirculation system, an active grille shutter, and reduced friction. The four-cylinder is paired with a new electric motor and a battery pack. The gas mill cranks out 95 horsepower and 105 pound-feet of torque, while the electric motor generates 71 horses and 120 pound-feet. Total system output is rated at 121 horsepower. Fuel efficiency has increased by 10 percent in the new model, which returns up to 58 mpg city, 53 mpg highway, and 56 mpg combined. Pricing starts at $23,475.

Read our full story on the 2017 Toyota Prius.

Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid


2017 Hyundai Ioniq - image 737980

The Ioniq was born out of Hyundai’s desire to give the Prius a run for its money. And, on paper, it seems that the Korean brand did a good job. Design-wise, the Ioniq isn’t as “weird” as the Prius, but it has a similar notchback layout and plenty of sporty cues. It looks surprisingly exciting for a hybrid, especially when compared to the old Prius and Insight. Inside, you’ll find a modern layout with soft touch surfaces, a decently large infotainment display, and loads of tech. Under the hood, the Ioniq brings together a 1.6-liter Kappa GDi gasoline engine with an electric motor and a six-speed, dual-clutch transmission (unlike the Prius, which uses a CVT). The gas engine is rated at 104 horsepower and 108 pound-feet of torque, while the electric motor adds an extra 43 horses. Total output is rated at 139 horsepower and 195 pound-feet, more than you get from the Toyota Prius. As far as efficiency goes, the Ioniq can return up to 54 mpg in the city. Pricing starts at $22,000, making it the most affordable proposition on this list.

Read our full review of the 2017 Hyundai Ioniq.

Chevrolet Volt


2016 Chevrolet Volt - image 610080

Redesigned for the 2016 model year, the second-generation Volt gaining a much more attractive exterior design and a surprisingly premium interior with standard rear-vision camera and a heap of safety features, including lane keep assist with lane departure warning, side blind zone alert with lane change alert, rear cross traffic alert, front automatic braking, and advanced park assist with front and rear park assist. However, the Volt is a bit different in how its drivetrain operates because it uses a small gasoline engine as a range-extending generator. The electric motors generate 149 horsepower and 294 pound-feet of torque and return an all-electric range of 50 miles. When the battery is depleted, the 101-horsepower, 1.5-liter engine kicks in to extend the range. Overall mileage, including fully charged batteries and a full tank of fuel, is estimated at an impressive 420 miles. But there is a downside to the Volt: it’s significantly more expensive than the competition, retailing from $33,220 before Government rebates. However, if you’re eligible for the full incentive, the sticker for a base model can drop to as low as $26,000.

Read our full story on the 2017 Chevrolet Volt.

Conclusion


2019 Honda Insight - image 757609

Needless to say, Honda’s strategy for the Insight has been rather awkward up until now. While Toyota built the Prius continuously since its introduction in 1997, Honda discontinued the Insight twice. But the Japanese hybrid returned with massive improvements the first time and it seems that the second revival is again a significant departure from its predecessor. It’s too early to draw a conclusion with the production model still a few months (if not a year) away, but the Detroit Auto Show should provide more information on this Toyota Prius competitor. Stay tuned!

  • Leave it
    • * Still a prototype
    • * Tough competition from Toyota and Hyundai

References

Honda Insight


2000 - 2006 Honda Insight - image 88100

Read our full review on the 2000-2006 Honda Insight.


2010 Honda Insight - image 280299

Read our full review on the 2010 Honda Insight.


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Read more Detroit Auto Show news.


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Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon 2019 Honda Insight Initial Details Revealed

With only a few days to go until the world premiere of the all-new 2019 Honda Insight at Detroit Auto Show, in prototype form, the Japanese auto maker has released the first details of the highly anticipated hybrid sedan. The new Insight is to be the best five-passenger hybrid car in its class. 

For that the fairly handsome car relies on  the third generation of Honda’s two-motor hybrid system. This system includes a 1.5 liter petrol engine and a powerful electric propulsion motor, the latter backed by a lithium-ion battery pack. The battery enables the 2019 Honda Insight to operate most of the time as a pure electric car with zero emissions. Honda has not yet revealed the electric range, nor the power and torque figure of this system. But they do point out that the batteries are located under the rear seats and as a result you get a full-size trunk.

Though still in prototype from, the 2019 Honda Insight does look quite pleasing, especially by the standards of the hybrid segment these days. We are yet to see the interior in full, but it should be equally good, as they say it boasts premium features including available perforated leather seating, an 8-inch Display Audio capacitive touchscreen and a 7-inch digital LCD driver’s meter. Technology-wise, too, the 2019 Insight is at the top of the top of the game with Honda LaneWatch on EX and above and Honda Sensing suite of advanced safety and driver-assistive technologies as standard equipment, including Collision Mitigation Braking System (CMBS), Lane Departure Warning, Road Departure Mitigation, Adaptive Cruise Control with Low-Speed Follow and new Traffic Sign Recognition.




“The new 2019 Honda Insight signals we are entering a new era of electrification with a new generation of Honda products that offer customers the benefits of advanced powertrain technology without the traditional trade-offs in design, premium features or packaging,” said Henio Arcangeli, Jr., senior vice president of Automobile Sales and general manager of the Honda Division, American Honda Motor Co., Inc. “The Honda Insight is anticipated to receive fuel economy ratings competitive with the best hybrids in the segment, with styling that will have universal appeal inside and out and best-in-class passenger volume.”

The post 2019 Honda Insight Initial Details Revealed appeared first on Motorward.

PostHeaderIcon Honda’s New Powerpack is Revolutionary in Terms of Simple Mobility

In the continuing quest to develop alternative sources of power, Honda took to the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show to unveil the Mobile Power Pack, a portable, swappable, and rechargeable battery that users can use to power digital devices, home appliances, emergencies, and electric mobility vehicles like motorcycles and scooters. The Mobile Power Pack is essentially an oversized powerbank that carries an output of at least 1kWh, enough juice to serve a myriad of purposes.


“The Mobile Power Pack is small in size, but it could create a large impact in the world, specifically in its potential to become a go-to power source in a number of situations”

The Mobile Power Pack is small in size, but it could create a large impact in the world, specifically in its potential to become a go-to power source in a number of situations. Honda says that two of these packs are powerful enough to get an electric motorcycle running. In most instances, though, one pack is enough to use for traveling, making it very useful for those who travel with a whole cavalcade of laptops and mobile devices.

In addition to the Mobile Power Pack, Honda also introduced the Mobile Power Pack Charge & Supply – Portable Concept charger/discharger. This device acts as a charging station for the Mobile Power Pack, and as a separate power source for connected electrical devices. Its small size and the presence of actual wheels means that it can be rolled around and transported easily. If the Mobile Power Pack Charge & Supply –
Portable Concept isn’t your cup of tea, you can opt for the Expandable Concept of the same product, which can be used on its own as a power source inside a house.

“The idea behind the Exchanger Concept is that if your Power Pack runs out of juice, you can go to a charging station and swap it for a fully charged unit.”

Proving that Honda really thought this technology through, it also unveiled the Mobile Power Pack Exchanger Concept, a different type of charging station that can charge multiple units of the Mobile Power Pack at once, while also supplying replacement packs for customers. The idea behind the Exchanger Concept is that if your Power Pack runs out of juice, you can go to a charging station and swap it for a fully charged unit.

References


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Read more Honda news.


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Read more CES news.


HondaLens Augmented Reality - The Future of the Dealership Experience - image 749046

Read more technology news.

PostHeaderIcon Meet Honda’s Newest Cute Robots the 3E Empathy, Empower, and Experience

Honda has pulled the covers off of four robot concepts at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show. Collective called the 3E Robotics Concepts, the small prototypes are more than just novelty items that Honda cooked up for our collective pleasures; they were created to give us a taste of what the future could look like with these robots by our sides to improve our daily lives in different ways. Three of these concepts are making their world debuts at CES. One of them, 3E-C18, made its debut at the 2017 Tokyo Motor Show last October.

Honda 3E Empower




The robot concepts represent three different ideologies that Honda subscribed to in creating them. The first of these ideologies is “Empower,” which focuses on a future where humans and robots can leverage each other’s strengths. It’s no wonder that Honda’s creation in this regard is 3E-D18, an autonomous off-road robot that uses artificial intelligence to help people accomplish a broad range of tasks, including as a helpful ally in agriculture, construction, and search and rescue operations. Functionally, 3E-D18 is based on a Honda ATV chassis so it’s as tough as it gets. It comes with four-wheel drive, has GPS and sensor-based autonomy, and has airless tires that allow it to smoothly run on rough road surfaces.

3E-D18 is joined by 3E-B18 under the Empower category. Unlike the rough and rugged 3E-D18, 3E-B18 looks like a futuristic version of the Segway. It does have more a functional side attached to it, including the ability to act as a stroller, a baggage cart, and as a personal ride. It even has a height-adjustable seating and is small enough to navigate tight spaces.

Honda 3E Experience


Falling under the “Experience” ideology is 3E-C18, the robotic concept that looks like a cooler with a face on it. Don’t be deceived by its looks, though, because 3E-C18 serves a variety of important functions, most notably as a mobile, AI-enabled platform that can help people from all walks of life. The concept also has the ability to learn through its AI platform and absorb what it learns to dictate how it operates autonomously. On the physical side, 3E-C18 also has carrying spaces and a canopy, not to mention a vehicle body base with a driving function in it.

3E Empathy


The last of the four concepts is arguably the most important one. It’s called 3E-A18, and it’s a robot concept that actually carries emotions with it. There’s a reason why it was classified under the “Empathy” ideology. Like the other concepts, 3E-A18 comes with AI application. Unlike the other concepts, 3E-A18 was developed specifically to be a personal companion. It has the ability to provide support for human activities, act as a guide in places like malls and airports, and communicate with people in certain situations. Physically, 3E-A18 is designed with a soft exterior skin to complement its range of facial expressions.

References


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.


maker logos - image 752756

Read more CES news.

PostHeaderIcon Honda Civic Type R – Driven (Again)

The Honda Civic Type R has quite a legacy to its name, though none of it happened on American soil. Thankfully, that’s changed for 2017 as Honda has finally brought the Type R Stateside. In fact, its turbocharged engine is made in Ohio before being shipped to Wiltshire, England for assembly in the car. That’s right, this Japanese hot hatch has an American heart and is born in Britain. How’s that for multi-cultural? But more than that, the Type R’s appearance on U.S. soil means we finally have the chance to compare it to its fiercest rivals – the Ford Focus RS, Subaru WRX STI, and Volkswagen Golf R.

As it turns out, I’ve driven each of the competitors. Each are immensely fun and worthy of loads of respect over their engineering and outright impressive performance. The Type R joins those ranks with the same impressive level of technical wizardry and high-tech manufacturing techniques. I’ll dive into some of that, along with comparing it to the RS, Subi, and Golf R. It will be a fun ride, so read along.

Continue reading for more on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


Exterior

  • Unique bodywork creates downforce
  • 20-inch lightweight alloy wheels
  • Sticky 245/30R Continental SportContact 6 tires

2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754482
“The Type R spent many hours in wind tunnel testing during its development and everything (mostly) serves a purpose.”

The Civic Type R is definitely a hot hatch by appearance. Honda has attached things like a chin splitter, hood scoop, rocker extensions, wider fenders, and that massive rear wing. Oh, and that’s in addition to the regular spoiler and large faux air intakes that carries over from the regular Civic Hatchback. Needless to say, the Type R is aggressive. Thankfully, the car’s bite matches its bark and the styling isn’t just for looks.

The Type R spent many hours in wind tunnel testing during its development. Everything (mostly) serves a purpose. The grille is separated into three sections; the large lower portion directs air to the turbochargers’ intercooler, the slot below the Honda logo directs air to the radiator, and the slot above the logo feeds the engine a cool blast of fresh air. There’s also the hood scoop. No, it doesn’t have some cool ram-air effect, but rather sends air behind the transversely mounted engine to both keep temperatures in check and to relieve air pressure under the hood.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754488
“The Type R is not a top-speed machine gunning for 150+ mph records, but every little bit of traction is welcomed when blasting down a racetrack.”

Other aero bits like the chin splitter and fins below the fog lights help generate downforce, while small vortex generators on the roof help direct air over the tall wing. The Type R is not a top-speed machine gunning for 150+ mph records, but every little bit of traction is welcomed when blasting down a racetrack.

Part of the Type R’s prodigious handling prowess comes from its wheel and tire combination. It rolls on lightweight 20-inch alloy wheels wrapped in 245/30R Continental SportContact 6 summer performance tires. For those not experts in tire sizes, 30-series sidewalls are about as tall as a pancake. It offers very little deflection and give – a necessity for that riding-on-rails feeling the Type R exhibits. The downside is, well, very little deflection and give. That makes the ride rather harsh on rough, broken pavement. It also makes those thin-spoked wheels a prime target for potholes. Still, the tradeoff is worth it; the Type R is a handling monster. But more on that later. As for looks, the wheel and tire combination is fantastic. I really appreciate the red ring the rim’s outer edge and how it matches the red accent running along the faux carbon fiber body kit.

Interior

  • Honda-developed front bucket seats
  • Red accents throughout
  • Suede stitching for contrast
  • 7.0-inch Infotainment system
  • Apple CarPlay & Android Auto
  • Seating for four life-sized adults
  • 25.7/46.2 cubic feet of cargo room

2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754508
“Compared to its rivals, the Type R takes second only to the Volkswagen Golf R.”

Honda engineers, designers, and bean counters had to devise an interior that added that something special while maintaining as many parts from the standard Civic as possible. In my view, they accomplished this compromise rather well. The Type R gets unique, Honda-built racing buckets up front, some faux carbon fiber accenting, a unique steering wheel, yards of suede and contrast stitching, and of course, splashes of red everywhere.

Not only are the seats red, but the steering wheel is accented in red, the dash has red hues, the seatbelts are red – heck, even the shift pattern engraved into the stainless steel knob is red. It goes a long way in adding that sporty feel to a cabin that is otherwise found in your sister’s Civic Touring. Don’t get me wrong; the Civic-y parts of the Type R are still relatively high quality and in no way detract from the Type R experience. In fact, I rather like the Type R’s interior. Compared to its rivals, the Type R takes second only to the Volkswagen Golf R – a car that’s known for its impressive Audi-like fineness and tasteful design. On the other hand, the Subaru’s interior feels dated while the Ford’s feels made from oily yet scratchy plastic found on public transportation.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754535
“There is 25.7 cubic feet of cargo room behind the rear seats and an impressive 46.2 cubic feet with them folded”

The other handy carry0ver from the standard Civic Hatchback is its cargo volume. There is 25.7 cubic feet of cargo room behind the rear seats and an impressive 46.2 cubic feet with them folded. That outdoes the Focus RS and Golf R with the seats in place, though the Golf R offers 52.7 cubic feet with its seats folded. The Civic also has a sliding shade hides cargo from prying eyes and glaring sunbeams. Since the Type R spent Christmas at my house, it spent time hauling presents back and forth to the in-law’s house. Aside from the massive rolling toolbox Santa brought my way, the Type R transported everything just fine.

Honda’s infotainment system offers plenty of functionality, too. It comes with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, along with satellite radio and GPS navigation. These come standard, of course, being that the Type R is a mon0-spec car based on the nicely equipped Civic Touring trim. Sadly, Honda left out the Civic Touring’s standard Honda Sensing safety suite and power-adjustable front seats in order to save on weight. While I’m ecstatic about the 3,100-pound curb weight, the absence of blind spot monitoring, rear cross-traffic detection, and other features is a bit disappointing. Then again, the large side mirrors and surprisingly open rear visibility meant never really needing the driving aids.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754517
“Unfortunately, the Civic’s 7.0-inch infotainment system hasn’t received that update”

Other features I miss is lumbar adjustment on the front seats and a knob for the radio volume. The Honda-developed racing buckets are great, but added adjustability would be welcomed. The missing knob has already been addressed in other Honda products since most everybody complained about the touch-sensitive slider. Unfortunately, the Civic’s 7.0-inch infotainment system hasn’t received that update. Redundant steering wheel controls help alleviate the issue.

It’s also worth pointing out I never had connection issue with the satellite radio during my week-long evaluation. That wasn’t the case during the Type R launch event in western Washington State. Apparently the mountainous terrain played havoc with the radio and GPS. Here in Central Florida where the tallest objects are pine trees, music flowed freely from the 540-watt sound system’s 12 speakers.

And speaking of speakers, the system includes all the standard connectivity methods. There is Bluetooth, along with a USB port hidden in a lower level below the center stack near the footwell. A pass-through with cord snaps allows for excellent management of cables, too. A second USB port is hidden deep below the cup holders in the center console.

Drivetrain

  • 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder
  • 306 horsepower at 6,500 rpm
  • 295 pound-feet of torque from 2,500 to 4,500 rpm
  • Six-speed manual transmission
  • Front-wheel drive
  • Limited-slip differentials
  • 5.4 seconds to 60 mph
  • 22 mpg city / 28 mpg hwy / 25 mpg comb

2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754504
“A high-tech, all-aluminum 2.0-liter four-cylinder with a turbocharger capable of producing 23.2 pounds of boost”

Behind that aggressive front bodywork is high-tech, all-aluminum 2.0-liter four-cylinder with a turbocharger capable of producing 23.2 pounds of boost. That’s impressive, especially for an automaker relatively new to the turbocharger game. What isn’t new is Honda’s legendary VTEC system. This valvetrain design modulates the phasing on its dual overhead camshafts to change the amount of valve lift and duration seamlessly through the rev range. The result is a torque-rich lower register and a powerful upper range. The numbers don’t lie: it makes 306 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 295 pound-feet of torque from 2,500 to 4,500 rpm.

The engine also features direct fuel injection for precise management of fuel flow into each cylinder. A lightweight crankshaft, connecting rods, and pistons, along with sodium-filled exhaust valve stems, contribute to the engine’s quick-revving nature. Blip the throttle and the tach shoots from idle to its 7,000-rpm redline in a blink.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754503
“The numbers don’t lie: it makes 306 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 295 pound-feet of torque from 2,500 to 4,500 rpm.”

The engine dumps its exhaust into a single pipe that runs though the transmission tunnel past the rear subframe. Once there, the pipe splits into three sections. The outer pipes feed mufflers while the center pipe feeds a resonator. That’s why there are three exhaust tips on the Type R. At higher revs, the outer mufflers handle the exhaust, while the center resonator is designed for low to mid-level revs. The resonator helps reduce the booming noises typically heard from inside the cabin of a four-cylinder car.

The Type R comes standard with one transmission: a six-speed manual. To the delight and enjoyment of enthusiasts and owners everywhere, the gearbox is super sweet to operate with short throws and snickety engagements into each notch. The clutch is a joy, too, with a light action and a predictable engagement point. It makes driving the Type R around town completely trouble-free. Combine that with the automatic rev matching, and the Type R’s gearbox ranks very high in the halls of legendary manual transmissions.

Unlike its competition, power to sent only to the Type R’s front wheels. While that might seem like a cheap cop-out on Honda’s part, the Type R’s light curb weight and nimble handling prove Honda engineers made a conscious decision to keep the Type R’s legacy of front-wheel drive. Honda does stack its deck by using a limited-slip differential.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754499
“Also a key player in putting power to the ground is the Type R’s dual-axis front suspension”

Also a key player in putting power to the ground is the Type R’s dual-axis front suspension. Basically, the steering knuckle is mounted further away from the MacPherson strut with its upper and lower ball joints creating a parallel line with the strut. By either physics or black magic, this reduces torque steer, making the car easier to handle without white-knuckling the steering wheel.

Performance wise, the Type R does lag slightly behind the Focus RS and WRX STI in straight-line runs. The Focus RS hits 60 mph in 4.7 seconds and the Subi does it quicker at 4.6 seconds. The Type R needs roughly 5.4 seconds. There are reports of some folks pulling off a 4.9-second run, however.

When not being driven like it’s stolen, the Type R returns relatively decent fuel economy. The EPA estimates it will achieve 22 mpg city, 28 mpg highway, and 25 mpg combined. During my week of evaluation, I averaged right at 23.1 mpg combined over roughly 300 miles of very mixed driving without trying for good economy. I have no doubt the Civic Type R is capable of hitting 25 mpg combined when driven respectably.

Drivetrain Specifications

Engine 2.0-liter Turbocharged Four-Cylinder
Horsepower 306 @ 6,500 rpm
Torque 295 pound-feet @ 2,500 – 4,500 rpm
Max RPM 7,000
Valvetrain DOHC; i-VTEC
Compression Ratio 9.8:1
Max Boost 23.2 PSI
Fuel System Direct injection; Premium Unleaded
Fuel Economy 22 city / 28 hwy / 25 comb

Behind the Wheel


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754506
“The Type R has three drive modes that drastically alter its behavior.”

Few cars I’ve driven exhibit the same kind of tossability and power as the Type R. It’s like driving a Mazda MX-5 Miata with an extra 151 horsepower and 245-series summer performance tires. The Type R has three drive modes that drastically alter its behavior. Comfort mode softens the adaptive dampers, dulls the throttle response, and eases the steering effort for a somewhat relaxed driving experience. Sport mode, the default mode upon start-up, heightens all three parameters. This makes the Civic Type R feel poised and capable of taking on twisty roads without being too high-strung for its own good.

For the racetrack, there’s +R mode. It dials the dampers, throttle, and steering to 11, making the Type R feel invincible. No, it doesn’t somehow make its 306 horsepower feel like the Focus RS’ 350, but +R mode makes the Honda’s horses run like a scalded dog.

Honda’s heavily bolstered front buckets seats do a magnificent job at holding bottoms in place. Their suede and mesh coverings grip rather well. The steering wheel is also fun to hold, though it’s surprisingly free of extra-thick grips, which is fine by me.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754497
“All told, the Type R is a well-balanced machine that is a terror at the track and a babe on the boulevard”

Also surprising is the view through the back glass. That tall wing does not impede the driver’s sight lines of traffic. Thin pillars and a tall roof also contribute to excellent views of the outside world. And as mentioned, those large side mirrors do a fine job.

All told, the Type R is a well-balanced machine that is a terror at the track and a babe on the boulevard. It is surprisingly capable of doing both, though it’s not without compromise. Those thin sidewalls on the Continental tires and lack of thick sound deadening material inside the cabin contribute to loads of road noise, especially on rough pavement. And despite the center resonator’s best efforts, the exhaust does drone somewhat when the engine is under load at lower revs. Last but not least, Honda decided to bury the HVAC controls within the infotainment screen. You’ve got to press the climate button below the 7.0-inch screen to load the HVAC menu screen. Only here is the vent fan speed and most of the auxiliary functions like defrost and vent location controllable. Thankfully, the dual-zone temperature knobs are within easy reach of the front occupants. The two passengers in the back seat made do with no vents at all.

Pricing


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The 2017 Honda Civic Type R is a mono-spec car, meaning it only comes one way and every one has the same features. The customer’s only choice is the exterior color and what add-on accessories the dealership will install. That means pricing is pretty simple – at least for the most part. Honda is charging $33,900 for the Type R, plus an $875 destination fee, bringing the total price to $34,775.

Unfortunately, Honda dealerships have reportedly been charging exorbitant amounts of mark-up. I’ve heard some dealers adding as much as $20,000 to the price! Thankfully, those instances seem to be isolated and most Type Rs are going for at or slightly above the MSRP.

The Competition

2017 Ford Focus RS


2016 Ford Focus RS – Driven - image 718773

The Ford Focus RS is the current horsepower and whiz-bang tech champ of this hot-hatch group. Its aesthetics are, in my view, a bit more restrained yet still appropriate for a 350-horsepower car. It offers optional Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tires, which are the current go-to choice for supercars the world over. They are wrapped around lightweight alloy wheels which cover big Brembo brakes. Inside, Ford didn’t really do much to update the interior. The front seats are from Recaro, the steering wheel has a flat bottom and thick grips, and there is an extra gauge pod perched on the dashboard. Beyond that, the RS’s cabin looks like any rental-grade Focus – and that’s too bad.

What the Focus RS lacks in interior swag, it more than makes up for with power. A 2.3-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder generates 350 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 350 pound-feet of torque at only 3,200 rpm. The turbocharged engine mates to a six-speed manual transmission that is then connected to a sophisticated AWD system. The AWD offers a rear-bias that makes the car more fun to toss around. Ford was even crazy enough to install a “drift mode,” which allows the car to fling sidewise like Ken Block himself is at the wheel.

Pricing is a bit steep for the RS. For 2017, Ford is charging $36,120. However, that doesn’t include the sticky Michelin tires, eight-way power driver’s seat, navigation, or several other comfort and convenience features. Check all the option boxes and the price will shoot to $41,550, just like the Focus RS reviewed here.

2018 Subaru WRX STI


2018 Subaru WRX STI – Driven - image 722048

Okay, so the Subaru WRX STi isn’t a hatchback, but it used to be. That legacy still keep this sedan barking up the same tree as the Focus RS, VW Golf R, and the new Civic Type R. And like those others, the WRS STI is based on an everyday car found basically everywhere. In the Subaru’s case, it’s the Impreza. However, there’s a catch. The 2018 Impreza is completely new, having undergone a generational update for the 2017 model year. The WRX STI and its middle-ground brother, the WRX, are sadly based on the previous generation Impreza. Nevertheless, both WRX version received a slight update for 2018, getting a more angular front end, larger wheels fitted over larger brakes, and a few updates to the interior.

Most of the greasy bits are still the same, however. Power comes from a 2.5-liter turbocharged Boxer four-cylinder making 305 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 290 pound-feet of torque at 4,000 rpm. A six-speed manual is the only gearbox. Subaru swapped in a new electrical center differential over the older mechanical one found in previous models. It’s sais to improve smoothness and responsiveness in the AWD drivetrain. It still allows for manual adjustment of the differential’s lock-up.

Pricing for the 2018 Subaru WRX STI starts at $36,095. Subaru does offer different trim levels with the WRX STI. The one seen here is a Limited trim and commands $40,895.

2016 Volkswagen Golf R


2016 Volswagen Golf R - Driven - image 692469

The VW Golf R is definitely the sleeper of the bunch. Its exterior isn’t cladded with big aero bits or low-hanging chin splitters. Rather, the Golf R looks rather mature. That’s certainly welcomed after spending a week with each of the other contenders. Less people point and stare, which for me, is a good thing. Those who like their ego stroked might not feel the same way. Inside, the maturity level continues. Aside from the somewhat extra-bolstered front seats and flat-bottom steering wheel, the Golf R doesn’t screen hot-hatch. Rather, it lets its engine do all the talking.

And talk it will! The Golf R comes with a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder making 292 horsepower at 5,400 rpm and 280 pound-feet of torque at only 1,800 rpm and hold a flat torque curve to 5,500 rpm. While the numbers suggest the Golf R is underpowered, it certainly doesn’t feel that way from behind the wheel. The VW is also the only contender here to offer a dual-clutch automatic transmission. It’s a quick-shifting bugger, but the standard six-speed manual gearbox is the enthusiasts choice.

Pricing for the 2016 Golf R I last reviewed started at $35,650, but carried an as-tested price of $39,375 thanks to options like the $820 DSG gearbox.

Conclusion


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754483

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R was clearly designed to compete against some fantastic hardware without copying their recipe. Honda ditched the idea of AWD or having exorbitant levels of horsepower from an overworked engine. Rather, the Type R is a focused, lightweight car with an engine that should hold up well past 150,000 miles. That’s no knock on the Ford, Subaru, or Volkswagen’s reliability, but there is something to be said for Honda’s reputation for trouble-free service.

From behind the wheel, the Type R feels extremely sorted and well built while offering an exhilarating drive that’s more than capable of landing drivers in jail. Its three drive modes allow for a range of attitudes, while its large trunk makes it usable for everyday tasks and grocery store runs.

The Type R could still use some more sound insulation to reduce tire noise, a volume knob for the radio, and physical HVAC controls that aren’t buried in the infotainment system. Still, the Type R is a fantastic daily driver and even better backroad burner. Honda definitely did its homework when developing the car and pricing it below its competitors. As for which one to buy, it boils down to personal preference. All four hot hatches offer outstanding performance and everyday livability, but go about that mission in different ways with different personalities. Take your pick and you won’t be wrong, but the Honda definitely makes a very strong case for itself.

  • Leave it
    • * Styling too aggressvie for some
    • * Needs a more fun exhuast note
    • * Loses all-weather capability had by classmates

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754506

2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754485

Here’s How Honda Manages Air on the 2017 Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754504

The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754489

Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R’s Suspension


2017 Honda Civic Type R - Driven (Again) - image 754481

Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver


2017 Honda Civic Type R – Driven - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the Honda Civic Type R.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719346

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Type R.

PostHeaderIcon Do New Patent Images Reveal Forthcoming Honda NSX Type R?

Recently published patent images show that Honda has a new, simplified air dam design that increases strength and rigidity, while simultaneously improving air flow as well. The patents also show what appears to be the new air dam attached to a second-generation NSX, spurring rumors that the H Badge could be cooking up a go-faster Type R iteration of its hybrid supercar.

Continue reading for the full story.

The Full Story


Do New Patent Images Reveal Forthcoming Honda NSX Type R? - image 754850
“These intakes use a mesh insert to help keep random rocks and sticks and small squirrels and other random road debris from entering the dam and damaging the cooling system”

The recently published images are a novel take on traditional air dam design. Typically, these intakes use a mesh insert to help keep random rocks and sticks and small squirrels and other random road debris from entering the dam and damaging the cooling system. However, Honda’s latest design instead employs crossbars to block the incoming debris, which then act as supports for the dam, helping to keep it stiff, while simultaneously easing the flow of atmosphere. The design is certainly useful for sports cars, but as the patent states, the design can also be applied to other segments.

However, as pointed out by our friends over at Motor1, the air dam design is clearly applied to the Honda NSX in the patent images, thus padding rumors that Honda is already working on a lighter, simplified iteration of its halo performance machine. That means that with the next product cycle, the NSX could very well carry the Type R badge.


Do New Patent Images Reveal Forthcoming Honda NSX Type R? - image 754847
“With the next product cycle, the NSX could very well carry the Type R badge.”

We certainly hope so. We’ve already put together a speculative review and rendering for such a machine, and we’ve got our fingers crossed it comes with the power gains (700 horsepower) and aggressive weight reduction we expect.

Either way, the air dam patent in question was filed in June of 2016, which means we might see the design in the real world very soon, where it’s on a Type R’d NSX or no.

As a reminder, the current NSX comes equipped with a twin-turbo 3.5-liter V-6 and no less than three electric motors, all of which help pump out 573 horsepower. Routing the muscle is a nine-speed dual-clutch transmission, while AWD puts it to the pavement. A sprint to 60 mph takes 3 seconds flat, while top speed is rated at 191 mph.

References

Acura NSX


2016 Acura NSX - image 640464

Read our full review on the 2017 Acura NSX.


2017 Acura NSX Type R - image 680959

Read our full speculative review on the 2018 Honda NSX Type R.

PostHeaderIcon 2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel

A
Rallye Red 2017 Honda Civic Type R has graced my driveway for the last week. Visible from my office window, the hot hatch just begs to be driven – and driven hard. It’s a Nürburgring-tuned monster with an appetite for the Ford Focus RS, Subaru WRX STI, and Volkswagen Golf R, yet is rather livable doing everyday, mundane trips around town. Honda somehow engineered the Type R to do both, though the phrase about being a jack of all trade and master of none definitely applies.

The Type R is based on the Civic Hatchback but receives extra structural adhesives for a more rigid chassis. It also gets a unique suspension system, complete with adaptive dampers, stiffer spring rates, and thicker anti-roll bars. And of course, the Type R has its own powertrain – a souped-up version of the Accord’s 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder. Here it makes 306 horsepower at 6,500 rpm and 295 pound-feet of torque from 2,500 up to 4,500 rpm. Honda chose to forego a complex and heavy all-wheel-drive system like the Ford, Subaru, and Volkswagen; instead, going with a front-wheel drive setup that allows for an extremely respectable curb weight of only 3,100 pounds. It’s this combination of light weight and rigidity that make the Type R what it is. And now that you know Honda’s recipe, here’s how the final product tastes.

Continue reading for more on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.

Behind the Wheel


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754508
“The Civic’s dash is visually interesting and most controls are logically arranged.”

Before diving into driving impressions, let’s cover Honda’s work with the 10th-generation Civic’s interior and the Type R improvements. First, the Civic’s dash is visually interesting and most controls are logically arranged. The gauges are easy to read at a glance, the steering wheel controls are mostly intuitive, and the infotainment system’s menus are easy to breeze through.

There are a few complaints, though. The gauge cluster could offer more vehicle information like individual tire pressure, and the five-way controller on the steering wheel confusingly operates both the radio stations and the gauge cluster info. Second, the HVAC system’s controls are hidden in a menu within the infotainment. Yeah, there’s a big “climate” button right under the screen, but the system often takes a few seconds to bring up the controls. These include the fan speed and blower location – two things that are commonly used. Beyond that, thankfully there are few drawbacks.


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754509
“It offers tons of cubby spots and clever spaces for things”

Scoring points for handiness, the Civic offers tons of cubby spots and clever spaces for things. The center armrest slides rearward for access to more cup holders, a third cupholder resides at the console’s bottom – perfect for those Trenta-sized drinks at Starbucks. Ahead of the shifter is a perfect spot for cell phones. The cubby includes a pass-through to a lower level where a USB port and 12-volt power plug are located. This makes managing cords a simple task.

Honda made a big deal about its sporty front seats at the Type R launch event I attended. They aren’t Recaro or Sparco branded, but are actually designed and built in-house. The seats are obviously heavily bolstered, which makes tossing the Type R into corners all the more fun. They do lack a lumbar adjustment, which I discovered after about three hours behind the wheel, does lead to a groaning. My pregnant wife also bemoaned them after about five minutes. Still, they are mostly very comfortable and certainly fit the Type R’s persona.


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754514
“There is a respectable amount of legroom and headroom for life-size adults”

Rear seat comfort is surprisingly good, too. There is a respectable amount of legroom and headroom for life-size adults. Unfortunately, the center seat and folding armrest were cut in the name of weight savings, making inboard elbows lonesome and the Type R a four-person car.

Of course, the Type R is still a hatchback, so it offers the same cargo volume as the standard Civic Hatch. That equates to 25.7 cubic feet of cargo room behind the rear seats and an impressive 46.2 cubic feet with them folded. A retractable cargo shade keeps prying eyes at bay.

Driving Impressions


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754482
“A light steering effort is needed in Comfort, while a heavy hand is needed in +R mode, which helps control the car’s dartiness at higher speeds”

The Civic Type R rides on adaptive dampers that correlate to three drive modes. Comfort, naturally, provides the smoothest ride, while Sport tightens things up a bit. Racetracks will find +R mode is best, with the suspension at its firmest. The drive modes also modulate the responsiveness of the steering and throttle. A light steering effort is needed in Comfort, while a heavy hand is needed in +R mode, which helps control the car’s dartiness at higher speeds. The low-effort setting makes for a more pleasurable drive around town. The opposite is true for the throttle; comfort mode has a heavy throttle that’s less sensitive, while +R mode only requires a light touch to send the 2.0-liter turbo-four skyrocketing to its 7,000-rpm redline. Sport mode splits the difference quite well.

Around town, Sport mode (which is the default mode) is all that’s needed. The engine willingly sings through its wide torque range between 2,500 and 4,500 rpm and up to its peak horsepower of 306 located at 6,500 rpm. The steering is incredibly direct and will send the Type R carving through a corner as if it were on rails. That’s no hyperbole, either. The Type R only exhibits understeer at the very limit, which is nearly unobtainable on the street. I was only able to find front-end plow when barreling into a corner at The Ridge Motorsports Park at Honda’s drive event back in August. Even then, the effect is minimal.


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“The brakes offer just the right amount of initial grip to avoid sudden jerks, yet will rip your face off if pressed hard”

The big Brembo brakes are just as good. Around town, the brakes offer just the right amount of initial grip to avoid sudden jerks, yet will rip your face off if pressed hard. Honda gave the Type R 13.8-inch, drilled front rotors over the standard Civic’s 11.1-inch discs. Out back are Honda-branded calipers, but they are mounted on 12.0-inch rotors compared to the standard 10.2-inch units. The front bumper includes hidden inlets that dump cool air right onto the brakes. The result is immense levels of stopping power, full stop after full stop. During the track event, the brakes showed no signs of fade even after back-to-back laps over a four-hour timeframe. Obviously, hard braking around town will never touch the brakes full capabilities.

That VTEC, Yo!


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“The 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder’s head and block are made from aluminum and its crankshaft is forged from ultra-lightweight steel”

While it an entire car to speed around a track, the engine is undeniably the focus point. Honda certainly focused on the Type R’s powerplant. The 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder’s head and block are made from aluminum and its crankshaft is forged from ultra-lightweight steel. The connecting rods and pistons are extremely light, too, along with the single-mass flywheel. Honda reinforced the main bearing caps for added strength. The result is an engine with super quick revs up to its 7,000-rpm redline and with its first major tune-up scheduled at 100,000 miles.

The VTEC system works to keep the engine making peak power and torque, regardless of the rev. The dual overhead camshafts phase to open the exhaust valves early during lower engine speeds, feeding the turbo more quickly. This eliminates turbo lag and helps generate that amazing 23.2 pounds of boost. Direct fuel injection also contributes to precise control of the engine’s operations.

2.0-liter Turbocharged Four-Cylinder
Horsepower 306 @ 6,500 rpm
Torque 295 pound-feet @ 2,500 – 4,500 rpm
Max RPM 7,000
Valvetrain DOHC; i-VTEC
Compression Ratio 9.8:1
Max Boost 23.2 PSI
Fuel System Direct injection; Premium Unleaded
Fuel Economy 22 city / 28 hwy / 25 comb

2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754518
“The only transmission available with the Civic Type R is a silky smooth six-speed manual”

The only transmission available with the Civic Type R is a silky smooth six-speed manual. Its short throws and light clutch make for quick shifts that anyone can nail. The gearbox also features automatic rev matching, which blips the throttle head of a downshift. It can be turned off, but even when on, the system doesn’t detract from the enthusiast’s driving experience.

A limited-slip differential keeps the Type R from being a one-wheel-wonder. It keeps both front tires fighting for grip rather than just overpowering a single tire that’s lost traction. It might seem like overkill on a four-cylinder, front-wheel drive hatchback, but the limited-slip is honestly needed, even with the massive 245/30R20 Continental SportContact 6 summer performance tires. And thankfully the rear tires are the same size, allowing for a tire rotation. That’ll probably be needed pretty soon as the Contis only have a tread wear rating of 240.

Final Thoughts


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The 2017 Honda Civic Type R is a helluva machine. Sure, it’s fantastic fun on a racetrack, but it’s also extremely livable on the daily. Perhaps the Volkswagen Golf R is better suited for daily driving, but the Type R is miles more fun. The Civic’s downfalls of a noisy interior, awkward HVAC controls, and a somewhat stiff ride thanks to the thin tire sidewalls are a fair trade-off for the soulful way the thing drives. Even a trip to the store is exciting, not to mention all the attention that gravitates toward the expressive bodywork.

Stick around for more content on the Honda Civic Type R. More is on the way!.

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754485

Here’s How Honda Manages Air on the 2017 Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754504

The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754489

Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R’s Suspension


2017 Honda Civic Type R: Life Behind the Wheel - image 754481

Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver


2017 Honda Civic Type R – Driven - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the Honda Civic Type R.


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719346

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Type R.

PostHeaderIcon Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver

At its heart, the Honda Civic Type R is still a Civic hatchback. That’s the key. It still offers 25.7 cubic feet of cargo room behind the rear seats, an impressive 46.2 cubic feet with them folded, and will comfortably hold two adults when not. The Civic Type R’s only downfall compared to its more pedestrian brother is its missing second-row middle seat. Everything else (size wise) remains unchanged through the Type R-ification.

What’s that mean? The 306-horsepower hot hatch makes a good daily driver. There’s room for a trip to IKEA, car seats fit just fine, and all the niceties like dual-zone climate controls abound. But there is more to being a good daily driver than just having room for people and their stuff. Factors like ride quality, sound levels, seat comfort, and fuel economy are also at play. Keep reading for the details on how these factors, well… factor into the Civic Type R’s daily livability.

Continue reading for more on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.

A Hot Hatch for Everyday Hooning


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“The Civic Type R is a lightweight, sharply tuned, track monster, but its precision handling doesn’t impede its ability at being a good "car."”

The Civic Type R is a lightweight, sharply tuned, track monster, but its precision handling doesn’t impede its ability at being a good “car.” The Type R comes with adaptive dampers at all four corners. These change the ride characteristics in correlation with the three drive modes: Comfort, Sport, and +R. The names are obvious as to their intention, and the Type R defaults into the middle ground of Sport mode upon startup. This is a hot hatch, after all, and Honda figures its owners will expect a spirited drive setting each time they hop in.

Toggling down a switch near the gear shifter moves the car into Comfort mode. This not only slightly softens the suspension but also loosens up the steering effort and decreases the throttle’s twitchiness. It’s akin to waking up early without coffee; it’s there and willing, but without the edginess of that caffeine rush.


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“The EPA estimates it will average 22 mpg in the city, 28 mpg on the highway, and 25 mpg combined”

It’s here in Comfort model that the Type R feels most livable. The throttle takes more effort to spur high revs from the 2.0-liter turbo-four, which when combined with smooth shifts on the notchy yet buttery six-speed manual’s short-throw shifter and light clutch pedal, provide a calming atmosphere. The shifter and clutch combo are very forgiving and free of jerkiness or driveline lash. The rev matching system makes downshifting child’s play, especially thanks to the 2.0-liter’s willingness to rev, even in Comfort mode.

The Type R is surprisingly frugal with its premium fuel, too. The EPA estimates it will average 22 mpg in the city, 28 mpg on the highway, and 25 mpg combined. It might not be a Toyota Prius, but the Type R does pretty well at not hurting its owners at the pump.


Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver - image 754506
“The front seats are somewhat challenging to slide into, a bit tight once in, and somewhat hard to pull yourself out of”

Of course, the Type R is no limousine. Even in its softest settings, the ride can be punishing and the tire noise can be intrusive on rough pavement. Much of that is due to the ultra-skinny 245/30R20 tires. Thirty-series tires are basically rubber bands seen on Cadillac Escalades in late 2000s rap videos. There is so little sidewall that every pebble translates into vibrations and kicks into the cabin. For those used to a firmer ride, it’s a very forgivable attribute. For those (like my pregnant wife) who would rather ride in a Cadillac, the Type R can be draining. My wife also bemoaned the Type R’s heavily bolstered front seats. They are somewhat challenging to slide into, a bit tight once in, and somewhat hard to pull yourself out of. Younger buyers who fancy skinny jeans shouldn’t mind at all.

Final Thoughts


Turns Out The 2017 Honda Civic Type R Makes a Good Daily Driver - image 754483

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R isn’t the quickest hot-hatch to 60 mph, the fastest on an open road, or the most advanced in terms of whiz-bang drivetrain components, but what it lacks in raw power or AWD grip, it more than makes up in lightness, refinement, interior space, and Honda’s reputation for reliability. Minus a few quirks, the Type R makes for a fantastic daily driver. A calm, somewhat mature Civic Hatchback lurks somewhere under that outlandish aero package and that makes for a great pairing with its weekend track star credentials. Best of all, the Type R costs a few thousand less than the competition, barring any dealership markups, of course. It starts at $34,775.

References

Honda Civic Type R – Driven


2017 Honda Civic Type R – Driven - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the Honda Civic Type R.

Honda Civic Type R


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719346

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Type R.

2017 Honda Civic Hatchback – Driven


2017 Honda Civic Hatchback – Driven - image 713620

Read our full driven review on the Honda Civic Hatchback.

2017 Honda Civic Hatchback


2017 Honda Civic Hatchback - image 689347

Read our full review on the Honda Civic Hatchback.

PostHeaderIcon Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R’s Suspension

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R is the newest hot hatch in the American market, but it’s not the most beastly contender. In fact, that title easily goes to the Ford Focus RS – the 350-horsepower AWD monster with drift mode. Rather than one-upping the Focus RS, the Honda development team aimed for lightweight precision and focused on drivability. The goal was creating a fully track-capable hatchback that was completely livable on public roads during daily driving. A substantial amount of math an engineering later, the Type R debuted with a unique suspension system that handles both.

Despite the Type R’s newness to the scene, we’ve had plenty of time behind the wheel. Honda had us at the launch event in August and we have one in the driveway as this is being written. (Believe us, it’s hard to remain behind the computer when seeing a red Type R through the window.) At the launch event in Washington State, Honda provided each journalist with their own Type R, allowing for uninterrupted driving and relief from awkward conversations with an unknown co-driver about their bad speeding habits. Track time at The Ridge Motorsports Park showed exactly how well the Type R could dance and provided a more intimate feeling of the car’s handling. Now we’re evaluating the Type R on familiar pavement. The consensus is that Honda did its homework. The Type R truly does offer a world-class driving experience with few trade-offs. We still think road noise is a bit too loud, but the low curb weight of only 3,117 pounds makes us understand the missing sound deadening material.

Continue reading for a full run-down of the Type R’s suspension.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729286
“The Type R gets 42.7 feet of structural adhesive in high-stress areas that are simply not present in the standard Civic Hatchback”

Honda engineers started with the Civic’s body. First, the new 10th-generation Civic is stronger and lighter than the previous car, but second, the Type R gets 42.7 feet of structural adhesive in high-stress areas that are simply not present in the standard Civic Hatchback. This leads to a 12 percent increase in lateral rigidity.

Mounted to the unibody is the Type R’s four-wheel independent suspension. Out back, the suspension remains very similar to the standard Civic’s, though it has unique active dampers, thicker anti-roll bars, and is 1.2 inches wider. Up front is where the magic really happens.

Behind a front-wheel-drive car, Honda had to overcome the Type R’s prodigious 306 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque from inducing unwanted torque steer – the effect of the engine’s power turning the steering wheel via drive force applied to the front tires. Honda uses what’s called a dual-axis front strut in order to counter this. Basically, the mountings for the front hubs are much closer to the hub and further away from the MacPherson strut tower. Aluminum knuckles help reduce unsprung weight while a thicker, 29mm anti-roll bar adds more control in hard cornering.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729272
“The front track is also 2.0 inches wider and the 245/30ZR20 summer-performance tires are an inch wider than the standard Civic’s equipment”

The front track is also 2.0 inches wider and the 245/30ZR20 summer-performance tires are an inch wider than the standard Civic’s equipment. That’s what necessitates the Type R’s widened bodywork.

As for the springs, the Type R uses coil springs with a spring rate 1.6 times greater than the stock car, while the anti-roll bar is 2.4 times more rigid. Even the bushings that hold everything together are nearly two times as firm. The Type R’s silver bullet is its Adaptive Damper System. The ADS has three firmness settings that correspond to the Type R’s three drive modes. The modes are Comfort, Sport, and +R. Each has their place and is dramatically different than the other.

Comfort mode is best suited for the street. It softens the dampers making imperfections in the road more bearable. The throttle is less twitchy and slightly more pedal travel is needed to spur the engine on. Sport mode is the driver’s choice for twisty roads. The throttle instantly becomes more responsive, the suspension is more ridges for better body control, and the entire car just feels more aggressive. When in +R mode, those Sport-mode attributes are multiplied 10 fold. It’s the mode best reserved for the track, especially since the adaptive dampers feel like they’ve been replaced with unbendable steel beams. The Type R in +R mode feels ridiculously nimble. Much of that can be attributed to the car’s 3,110-pound curb weight and super sticky tires.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729293
“The Type R in +R mode feels ridiculously nimble.”

On the track, we found the Type R to only exhibit very mild and predictable understeer only at the limit. Otherwise, the car tracks straight and true, offering a fun-filled and safe driving experience. Adding to that is the lightweight clutch and silky smooth six-speed shifter.

Hitting the Brakes


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“Big Brembo calipers with four pistons grab 13.8-inch drilled rotors”

The Type R is impressively good at stopping, too. The front brakes are vastly upgraded over the standard Civic’s binders. Big Brembo calipers with four pistons grab 13.8-inch drilled rotors. (The stock rotors only measure 11.1 inches in diameter.) Under-body cooling vents direct air to the front brakes for long-lasting performance. Out back, the Civic’s 10.2-inch solid rotors are upgraded to 12.0-inch discs, though a single-piston caliper is still used. Combined, the brakes haul the Civic Type R from 60 mph to a full stop in an utterly short 99 feet.
And for those wondering, the sprint back to 60 mph only takes 5.4 seconds thanks to the Type R’s wonderful 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder.

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719399

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


Managing The Bump: A Look at the Civic Type R's Suspension - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R

The Honda Civic Type R is powered by a 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder constructed from aluminum. It uses Honda’s proven VTEC system to phase the timing of the 16 overhead valves. Rotational mass is kept down thanks to sodium-filled exhaust valves and lightweight pistons. A short blip of the throttle will have the 2.0-liter screaming at its 7,000-rpm redline in very short order. Thankfully, redline isn’t required for making peak horsepower. All 306 galloping ponies are in full stampede at 6,500 rpm and the 295 pound-feet of torque peak at only 2,500 rpm but stays through 4,500 rpm.

Temperatures are kept in check by an intercooler, a radiator, and four separate inlets into the engine bay. The lowest inlet in the grille chills the turbo’s intercooler while the space below the Honda H directs air to the engine’s radiator. The upper slot just below the hood is what feeds fresh air into the intake. Last but not least, the hood scoop is used to push cool air down the backside of the engine while relieving positive air pressure under the hood and thereby reducing lift.

More cooling happens via the oil jets that squirt the underside of the piston and the water-cooled, two-piece exhaust manifold. As for those oil jets, they not only cool the pistons and cylinder walls, they also provide a constant flow of lubrication.

After air leaves the unique exhaust manifold, it travels down a single exhaust pipe. Behind the rear axle, the pipe forks off into three seconds. The outer pipes go to large mufflers, while the center pipe feeds a resonator. The three each feel their own exhaust tip in the center of the bumper. Honda says the center resonator is used to control mid-rev booming inside the cabin, while the outer mufflers move vast amounts of air at high speeds. Interestingly, the center resonator actually generates negative pressure at higher revs. The result is a snarling yet not overbearing exhaust note – both from inside and outside the car.

Read our full, driven review of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.

Continue reading for charts and stats.

Drivetrain Specifications


The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 729258
Engine Type Turbocharged In-Line 4-Cylinder
Turbocharger Single-Scroll MHI TD04 with Internal Wastegate
Boost Pressure 22.8 psi
Displacement (cc) 1,996
Horsepower (SAE net) 306 HP @ 6,500 RPM
Torque (SAE net) 295 LB-FT @ 2,500-4,500 RPM
Fuel economy (City/Highway/Combined) (mpg) 22 / 28 / 25
Curb Weight (lbs.) 3,117
0 to 60 mph 4.9 seconds
Quarter-mile 13.5 seconds at 108 mph
Top Speed 169 mph

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719399

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


The Turbocharged Heart of the 2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon Watch How Honda Manages Air on the 2017 Civic Type R

The 2017 Honda Civic Type R has made massive waves in the hot hatch segment since its launch midyear. The Type R blazes its own trail with a different map that Ford and Subaru use for their Focus RS and WRX STI. The Honda lacks a fancy AWD system, drift mode, or some expensive Recaro or Sparco branded seats. Rather, Honda focused on reducing mass and aerodynamics. The aero work is clearly seen when looking at the car, but there’s more to the story than just tall spoilers and big intakes.

Rob Keough with Honda Civic Product Planning goes into deep detail on all the Type R’s aerodynamic surfaces and cooling ductwork in this five-minute video from Honda. Keough goes through the visual tour of the car’s thermal package first, showing the three separate intakes for the intercooler, radiator, and engine air intake. The hood-mounted scoop then channels air down and out of the engine bay. This not only helps relieve air pressure, but also reduces lift on the front wheels. A hidden air duct below the fog lights help cool the front brakes.

Around back, the wing is positioned high enough to not block rear visibility yet is thin enough to not cause any undue drag. Its angle and shape are positioned to create downforce at higher speeds, aided by vortex generators along the rear of the roof. Honda says the Type R has a drag coefficient of 0.26, which is incredibly low. By comparison, the Bugatti Chiron has a drag coefficient of .35 in its Top Speed mode. Yeah…

Of course, aerodynamics are only a part of the 2017 Civic Type R’s story. We’ll have more Type R content this week as we’ve got one in the driveway. Feel free to ask questions in the comments and we’ll answer them.

References

Honda Civic


2017 Honda Civic Type R - image 719399

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R.


2017 Honda Civic Type R – Driven - image 729293

Read our full driven review on the 2017 Honda Civic Type R


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon 2019 Honda Insight Set for NAIAS Debut

2018 North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit will see the debut of a new generation of an old green car. The all-new 2019 Honda Insight is all set to pickup where its ancestors left off, and claim a bigger chunk of the hybrid car market for the Japanese company. 

Once known as the “Cadillac of Hybrids,” the Insight has a long history dating back to 1999. Some of you may still remember the odd looks of the first-gen model with its covered rear arches. It was an oddball alright, but still looked better than the contemporary Toyota Prius. The new 2019 Honda Insight, though, is not at all odd. In fact one could say it is a little on the boring side, even though it does have some nice design cues that set it apart from most other models in its class.

To be revealed in near-production prototype guise in Detroit, the 2019 Honda Insight will boast a 5-door, 5-passenger layout with smart interior design and packaging. The car will be powered by the latest generation of Honda’s innovative two-motor hybrid system offering “competitive” fuel economy. Knowing Honda’s hybrid history, we are not that optimistic about the performance figures of this system, but the economy should be pretty decent. The new Insight will launch in America next summer.








“With its sophisticated styling, dynamic stance, ample interior space and best-in-class performance, the all-new Insight embodies Honda’s approach to creating electrified vehicles without the typical tradeoffs,” said Henio Arcangeli, Jr., senior vice president of Automobile Sales and general manager of the Honda Division, American Honda Motor Co., Inc. “You won’t have to be an electrification advocate to appreciate the new Insight – it’s a great car in its own right, independent of what’s happening under the hood.”

The post 2019 Honda Insight Set for NAIAS Debut appeared first on Motorward.

PostHeaderIcon Honda Insight Returning After Four Years; Prototype Ready for Detroit Debut

Discontinued in 2014, the Honda Insight is about to make a comeback for the 2019 model year. The big news comes from the Japanese automakers, which just announced that a prototype model will be shown at the 2018 Detroit Auto Show in January. Described as a precursor to the all-new model, which will go on sale next year, the prototype is will preview a vehicle described as an “upscale, stylish five-passenger sedan positioned above the Civic in the lineup.”


Honda Insight Returning After Four Years; Prototype Ready for Detroit Debut - image 753495
“The new Insight will feature the company's latest-generation, "innovative two-motor hybrid system."”

Honda didn’t release too many details, but it did mention that the new Insight will feature the company’s latest-generation, “innovative two-motor hybrid system.” Honda also promises “fuel economy that is competitive with other compact hybrid models.” The third-gen hybrid should also include “premium features and performance desired by mainstream car buyers” and present an entirely new approach in terms of styling and packaging. Well, this is definitely good news, as the previous Insight lacked some of the modern features available in vehicles from rival brands.


Honda Insight Returning After Four Years; Prototype Ready for Detroit Debut - image 753491
“While precise data isn't yet available, Honda is making a third attempt at competing against the popular Toyota Prius”

While precise data isn’t yet available, Honda is making a third attempt at competing against the popular Toyota Prius. Introduced in 1999, the first-gen Insight was the first hybrid vehicle sold in the United States and had relative success on the market until 2006. Redesigned from the ground up, the second-generation model, launched in 2009, posted far better sales in both the U.S. and Europe, but that didn’t last long. After selling more than 20,000 units per year in 2009 and 2010, and over 15,000 in 2011, North American sales dropped to less than 6,000 in 2012 and less than 5,000 in 2013. As a result, the Insight was discontinued in 2014.


Honda Insight Returning After Four Years; Prototype Ready for Detroit Debut - image 753494

Honda is reviving the nameplate for the third time, and this is good news for the market, but will the new Insight have what it takes to steal customers from the Toyota? We will probably find out more about that in January, so make sure you stick around for updates from the Detroit Auto Show.

References

Honda Insight


2014 Honda Insight - image 542846

Read our full review on the 2014 Honda Insight.


maker logos - image 753286

Read more Detroit Auto Show news.

PostHeaderIcon Stolen Honda HR-V Found With Lyft Stickers And 13,000 Miles On The Odometer

A brand new Honda HR-V that was stolen back in August in front of the apartment of its owners has been found abandoned on the side of a road for around two weeks. That in itself makes this a head-scratching case. But the story doesn’t end there. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the stolen HR-V had Lyft stickers on the front and rear windows, a sign that the HR-V was used as a Lyft vehicle at the time it was stolen.


Stolen Honda HR-V Found With Lyft Stickers And 13,000 Miles On The Odometer - image 578881
“The car’s mileage spiked from 2,000 miles at the time the car was stolen a few months ago to 13,000 miles when it was discovered recently”

This case is one for the books because of all the information that’s been revealed so far. Apart from the presence of the stickers, local authorities also noticed that the car’s mileage spiked from 2,000 miles at the time the car was stolen a few months ago to 13,000 miles when it was discovered recently. The HR-V also had a rattling hood, a few dents on the bodywork, and a cabin littered with a pillow, jacket, and stuffed animal. It’s unclear if the items found inside belonged to the owners, Josh and Cierra Barton.

For its part, Lyft denied any knowledge of the HR-V being used for ride-hailing purposes. Either way, the company issued a statement, saying that the “safety of the Lyft community is our top priority, and we take these allegations seriously.”


Stolen Honda HR-V Found With Lyft Stickers And 13,000 Miles On The Odometer - image 578883
“The HR-V also had a rattling hood, a few dents on the bodywork, and a cabin littered with a pillow, jacket, and stuffed animal”

“Given the information provided, we are unable to match this vehicle to any Lyft accounts in the area. We have reached out to Ms. Barton, and we stand ready to assist law enforcement in any investigation”, the company added.

This is an unusual crime on par with the thief who stole a set of tires from a Honda Accord owner twice in a span of a few days. It’s amusing to read about crimes like these from a distance, but they’re really nothing to joke about. Hopefully, the thief who jacked the HR-V is apprehended before he steals another car and uses it for nefarious reasons.

References

Honda HR-V


Stolen Honda HR-V Found With Lyft Stickers And 13,000 Miles On The Odometer - image 578892

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda HR-V.


maker logos - image 742500

Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon Poor Guy Has Rims Stolen from His Honda Accord Twice in One Week

There’s bad luck, and there’s really bad luck. A couple from Prince George’s County in Maryland found themselves on the short end of the stick when a thief stole all four tires from their Honda Accord not once, but twice. The first incident occurred on November 28 when surveillance footage showed a man getting out of his car and jacking the tires from the Accord before it leaving it on bricks. To prevent the incident from happening again, the husband of the owner of the car, identified as Anthony Greer, decided to install a Viper alarm system with a tilt sensor on the Accord. Turns out, the two safety devices weren’t enough to prevent the crime from happening again. Exactly a week later on December 5, the thief managed to steal the Accord’s new set of tires after breaking the wheel locks and leaving the car on the same type of bricks.


Poor Guy Has Rims Stolen from His Honda Accord Twice in One Week - image 752254
“Investigators have identified the Accord’s wheels as the targets of the two thefts”

There are times when you’re just at a loss for words. It’s depressing enough to have this kind of theft happen to you once, but to happen twice? That’s beyond bad luck; that’s on the level of being jinxed. I do admire the composure Greer showed when he was interviewed about the two thefts. Instead of being justifiably mad, Greer offered advice on the thief, calling on him to use his talents and intelligence “for good.” That said, I’m pretty sure that advice is going to fall on deaf ears.

It’s unclear how far along the Prince George’s County Police Department is on the investigation, but investigators have identified the Accord’s wheels as the targets of the two thefts. It’s common knowledge within the industry that there are certain wheels that have common bolt patterns. This feature makes them appealing to thieves because they can be flipped for a profit pretty quickly. It just so happens that the Honda Accord is very popular among thieves in the US.


Poor Guy Has Rims Stolen from His Honda Accord Twice in One Week - image 752256

Hopefully, the Greers don’t get to experience this feeling a third time. It’s never fun to be on the short end of a theft. It’s worse if it happens twice, but three times? That’s hard to get back from.

References

Honda Accord


2018 Honda Accord - image 723397

Read our full review on the 2018 Honda Accord.



Read more Honda news.

PostHeaderIcon HondaLens Augmented Reality – The Future of the Dealership Experience

Honda has high hopes for the all-new 2018 Accord, so it’s taking the car’s dealership experience to a whole new level with a new feature called HondaLens. The augmented reality (AR) feature puts prospective customers in a unique position of seeing the Accord and its features in a whole new light, literally and figuratively. The proprietary system made its debut at the 2017 Los Angeles Auto Show in grand fashion. Those in attendance were given an opportunity to peak into the history of one of Honda’s best-selling models before diving deep into the array of features that the tenth-generation Accord has at its disposal.


HondaLens Augmented Reality - The Future of the Dealership Experience - image 749044
“The HondaLens feature allows users to view six hidden stories about the car that they can discover by walking around the car”

This is something to look forward to. I’ve been exposed to augmented reality before, but not in this kind of presentation. It’s good that Honda is taking advantage of the budding technology to present a new way of dealership engagement for its customers. It’s one thing to get the usual schtick from sales agents; it’s another thing to wear Microsoft’s HoloLens reality smart glass and have the stories of the Honda Accord brought before your eyes in ways that we only used to see in Hollywood.

According to Honda, the HondaLens feature allows users to view six hidden stories about the car that they can discover by walking around the car. Way-finding arrows and voice-over instructions are included in the presentation to make it easier for a customer to engage himself into the augmented reality that’s flashing before his eyes. Ever seen a hologram version of the Accord’s new turbocharged engine floating out of the hood? HondaLens can do that. There’s even a feature that puts a customer in the driver’s seat, and he experiences simulated traffic scenarios that are projected through the windshield. Move to the passenger seat, and the AR presentation turns to the various tech features that the all-new Accord is carrying. Pretty cool, right?


HondaLens Augmented Reality - The Future of the Dealership Experience - image 749043
“What’s unclear at this point is Honda’s plans for HondaLens after the LA Auto Show.”

What’s unclear at this point is Honda’s plans for HondaLens after the LA Auto Show. It’d be cool to find this feature in its dealerships in the near future, but I won’t hang my hat on that happening anytime soon. I do hope it becomes available sooner than later. The quicker we get HondaLens into dealerships, the quicker it would be for us to appreciate the technology and what it’s all about.

References

Honda Accord


2018 Honda Accord - image 723397

Read our full review on the 2018 Honda Accord.


2017 Los Angeles Auto Show – Visitor's Guide - image 745566

Read more 2017 Los Angeles Auto Show news.

PostHeaderIcon Honda Plans for 15-Minute EV Charging Times by 2020

Honda Sports EV Concept

Compared to a lot of automakers, Honda has remained largely mute about its EV goals for the future. Be that as it may, the brand recently released two EV concepts and is now aiming for 15-minute charging by 2022, effectively tackling the largest hurdle in the mission of EVs moving into the mainstream category. The goal is to provide at least 240 km on a single, 15-minute charge, or at least 80-percent capacity – the industry standard at this point. The company will get an assist in this mission, however, as most of Europe and Japan should have a full network of 350 kW charging stations by 2020, and infrastructure that is a necessity for this type of fast charging to even be feasible let alone become a reality. To put that timeline into perspective, Honda is expecting to have production EVs on the road by 2019 and this high-speed charging in play just three years later. But, there’s a bit more to it – keep reading to learn more.

Honda’s 2022 Quick Charging Strategy & More


2017 Honda Sports EV Concept - image 740627
“Part of its game plan for this extremely fast charging rate is to develop a new battery that can make it possible since the current Lithium-Ion batteries just can’t do it”

While extremely fast charging has been proven to be possible, it’s not something that can just happen with the current technology we have on hand. Models like the Nissan Leaf and Fiat 500e, for example, can take in an 80-percent charge in around a half hour or so and models like the Mitsubishi i-MiEV and Honda Fit EV could achieve faster charging rates as well, but the two latter models used SCiB batteries that could soak up a faster rate of charge. Right now, the problem is that SCiB batteries can take in all of that current, but can’t offer up longer range.
And, this is where companies like Toyota, Honda, and even Fisker are fighting to be the first to bring to life a solid-state battery.

To be clear, Honda hasn’t come right out to say that it’s developing a solid-state battery, but part of its game plan for this extremely fast charging rate is to develop a new battery that can make it possible since the current Lithium-Ion batteries just can’t do it. Toyota has been on a mission to develop a solid-state battery but is still running into some kinks with reliability and lifespan Mazda is partnered with Toyota but won’t get its battery technology, so it may also be on its own mission to develop a battery. Then you’ve got Fisker, which just so happened to patent a battery that promises 500 miles of range on a one-minute charge – something that could quite literally decimate the current battery industry and anything any automakers, including Tesla, have at the moment. Fisker’s design is said to be a solid-state battery as well, so it’s a pretty clear indication that this is where the battery industry is going, at least for cars, anyway.


2017 Honda Sports EV Concept - image 740629
“At this point in time, Honda currently sources the batteries that it uses in its hybrid vehicles from companies like Panasonic”

So, how is Toyota and Fisker’s work relevant to what Honda is currently working on?

Well, that’s a good question, and I have a good answer. At this point in time, Honda currently sources the batteries that it uses in its hybrid vehicles from companies like Panasonic. Once it starts distributing production versions of vehicles like the Sports EV concept or the Honda Urban EV Concept, it needs to have a more solid foundation for its batteries, and that’s why it’s planning to develop an all-new battery of its own. However, it plans to do so with a partner that will be chosen at a later date. With Japanese competitor Toyota already putting in a lot of work on the solid-state battery, that could be a fruitful relationship if both companies could work together and share the technology.

That may not be likely, considering Toyota won’t even share it with its current partner, Mazda, but it’s a possibility – Honda has the resources to commit to development and production that Mazda simply doesn’t. Then again Honda and Fisker could join forces on this battery technology. Honda is in need of a solid-state battery with fast charging, and there’s no doubt that Fisker could use some support. It sounds like a good idea to me, but whether or not Honda will jump on either potential partnership remains to be seen. It could also go with a non-competitor, like Samsung or Panasonic in the development of these batteries, or even a brand like Tesla that is, without a doubt, secretly developing its own new battery technology behind the curtains.

What do you think? Can Honda really deliver 15-minute charging by 2022? Will Honda bring mass-market EVs to the streets before the turn of the decade? Will it partner with Fisker, Toyota, or even Tesla? Let us know what you think in the comments section below.

References


2017 Honda Sports EV Concept - image 740632

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Sports EV Concept.


Does Honda's Urban EV Concept Prove that Honda has no Idea what it is Doing? - image 731195

Read our full review on the 2017 Honda Urban EV Concept.

PostHeaderIcon 2018 Honda Accord 2.0T Pricing Revealed

If the 1.5 liter version of the new Accord is not to your taste, in a couple of days you can buy the 2.0 liter model. Going on sale from November 20, the 2018 Honda Accord 2.0T, which is the most well-rounded version of the new family sedan, starts at $30,310 MSRP.

To that you have to add $890 for destination and handling, but still, that sounds like good value. That 2.0 liter unit is a peach of an engine, featuring VTEC Turbo direct-injected DOHC and developing 252 peak horsepower and 273 lb.-ft. of torque. This is the same basic engine they use in the Civic Type-R hot hatch. Economy-wise, it returns 23/34/27 mpg (city/highway/combined). You can have this engine with either a short-shift 6-speed manual gearbox or a 10-speed automatic.

2018 Honda Accord 2.0T also boasts a more rigid, lightweight and tightly sealed body and all-new chassis design, so to drive it should be as delightful as it is odd to look at.

Well, maybe odd is a bit unfair. But you can’t deny the looks of the new Accord is somewhat polarizing. You either love it or hate it with a passion. In terms of equipment, the standard kit on 2018 Honda Accord 2.0T include wireless device charging, segment-first auto Bluetooth phone pairing with Near Field Communication sensor technology, a 6-inch head-up display, customizable digital driver’s meter, 12-way power adjustable driver’s seat, and the next generation of HondaLink Assist connected-car technology. Higher trim levels including Touring get an upgraded 8-inch Display Audio touchscreen.

2018 Accord 2.0T Trims, MSRP & EPA

Trim / Transmission MSRP MSRP Including $890 Destination EPA Fuel Economy Ratings
(city / highway/ combined)
Accord 2.0T Sport / 6MT $30,310 $31,200 22 / 32 / 26
Accord 2.0T Sport / 10AT $30,310 $31,200 22 / 32 / 26
Accord 2.0T EX-L / 10AT $31,970 $32,860 23 / 34 / 27
Accord 2.0T EX-L Navi / 10AT $32,970 $33,860 23 / 34 / 27
Touring / 10AT $35,800 $36,690 22 / 32 / 26

The post 2018 Honda Accord 2.0T Pricing Revealed appeared first on Motorward.

PostHeaderIcon 2018 Honda Clarity Plug-in Hybrid Priced from $33,400

Putting their fuel cell plans aside for a while, Honda is going to focus on stepping up their hybrid game in America. And so on December 1 they will launch the new 2018 Honda Clarity Plug-in Hybrid, a decidedly green-looking sedan that starts at a fairly reasonable $33,400.

At that price you get a well-appointed basic model with highlights such as smart start and entry, dual zone air con, 8 inch display, USB, HD radio, rear camera, Honda Sensing safety pack with Lane Watch, stability assist, driver and front passenger front, side and knee airbags, 18 inch alloys, LED daytimers, rain-sensing wipes, and… The $36,600 Touring model adds Navigation with Charging Infrastructure Information, leather steering, 8-way electric seat for the driver with memory, 4-way seats for the passenger, perforated leather, and Ultrasuede.

Powering the 2018 Honda Clarity Plug-in Hybrid is a 1.5-liter Atkinson cycle 4-cylinder engine with a 17-kilowatt hour (kWh) battery pack. The system generates 212 horsepower and offers a range of 340 miles and 47 miles of electric driving. You also get three selectable modes – Normal, Econ and Sport, and a special HV mode – is provided to maintain the battery’s state of charge and can be selected in conjunction with Normal, Econ and Sport driving modes. But the 44/40/42 MPG rating (city/highway/combined) fuel economy may not strike you as particularly brilliant. Still, this Clarity is eligible for a federal income tax credit of up to $7,500. So who cares!

The post 2018 Honda Clarity Plug-in Hybrid Priced from $33,400 appeared first on Motorward.

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