Subscribe:
Chilton’s Repair:
Sponsored Ads:
Car Charger:
Sponsored Ads:
AutoBarn.com:
Auto Europe:
SuperTune Auto Parts:
STV Motorsports Universal Black 4 Point 2 Inch Straps Auto Harness Seat Belt
$69.99
End Date: Thursday Apr-18-2019 15:24:22 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $69.99
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

ZAMP - ZR-30 SFI-5 Auto Racing Shoes - SFI Rated Nomex Lightweight Suede Shoe
$79.95
End Date: Thursday Apr-11-2019 14:40:36 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $79.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

ZAMP - ZR-30 SFI-5 Auto Racing Shoes - SFI Rated Nomex Lightweight Suede Shoe
$79.95
End Date: Thursday Apr-11-2019 14:40:36 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $79.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

ZAMP FSA-3 Snell SA2015 Auto Racing Helmet - Full Face Snell Rated Racing Helmet
$159.95
End Date: Thursday Apr-11-2019 16:38:35 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $159.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

RaceQuip 351005 Large 1-Layer Black Auto Racing Driving Gloves Nomex SFI Rated
$39.95
End Date: Sunday Apr-14-2019 19:40:04 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $39.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

ZAMP FSA-3 Snell SA2015 Auto Racing Helmet - Full Face Snell Rated Racing Helmet
$159.95
End Date: Thursday Apr-11-2019 16:38:35 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $159.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

ZAMP FSA-3 Snell SA2015 Auto Racing Helmet - Full Face Snell Rated Racing Helmet
$159.95
End Date: Thursday Apr-11-2019 16:38:35 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $159.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

ZAMP - RZ-58 SA2015 Auto Racing Helmet- Snell Rated Opt. Fresh Forced Air Helmet
$169.88
End Date: Monday Apr-15-2019 12:58:14 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $169.88
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

IMPACT Auto Racing Shoes Mens Size 10 Mid Top Suede 3.3/5 SFI
$35.00
End Date: Wednesday Mar-27-2019 10:20:04 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $35.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

STV Motorsports Auto Seat Belt Harness 4 Point 2" RZR XP1K Yamaha Can-Am (Pair)
$120.00
End Date: Saturday Apr-20-2019 14:21:18 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $120.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Archive for the ‘Mid-Cycle Updates’ Category

PostHeaderIcon BMW 118i – driven

BMW will soon stop production of the current, second-generation, F20/F21 1-Series, a model that is a truly unique proposition in the compact hatchback segment. What sets it apart from all other similar rivals is the fact that it has a longitudinally mounted engine and most examples are rear-wheel drive (although some xDrive-equipped models were also sold). This engine and drivetrain layout dominates the driving experience, and it turns the current 1-Series into a peerless car in its segment. And, it’s not rear-wheel drive just for the sake of it, because it handles like a true rear-wheel-drive car should, blending a surprisingly playful rear end when you want it to be, with a reassuring, surefooted feel when you want grip.

My 2019 BMW 118i five-door hatchback tester was also quite an interesting proposition because its power plant only has three cylinders and a displacement of 1.5-liters. However, thanks to turbocharging, the three-pot is surprisingly apt at moving the car and, since the engine is small and light, it improves the car’s overall handling characteristics.

PostHeaderIcon Kia Gives 2019 Niro Electrified Crossover Its Midlife Refresh

Kia reports that it has sold over 270,000 Niro crossovers since it launched the compact crossover model in 2016, and some 100,000 of those sales were to European customers. It’s the brand’s fifth-most-popular model in Europe, so that’s why it’s chosen to reveal the refreshed versions of the Niro hybrid and Niro plug-in hybrid at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show, one of the most important auto shows on the Old Continent.

PostHeaderIcon Toyota Sequoia – Driven

The Toyota Sequoia is alive and kicking. You’re forgiven if you’ve forgotten, even despite Toyota giving the full-size SUV a slight update for 2018. The Sequoia’s sales pale in comparison to its rivals, and as such, there are simply fewer on the road. But that doesn’t mean the Sequoia is a bad SUV, right? We decided to have a look.

Our tester came decked out with all the extra goodies thanks to the range-topping Platinum trim. Of course, it also carried all the update Toyota gave it for the 2018 model year, including a new nose, a revised gauge cluster, and the now-standard Toyota Safety Sense-P active safety system. Beyond that, however, the 2018 Sequoia looks and feels nearly identically to the 2008 version.

It’s hard to believe the Sequoia’s second-generation is now a decade old. It harks back to Toyota’s major revamp of the Tundra pickup. It changed to a full-size truck for the 2007 model year and the Sequoia followed suit the next year. The Sequoia shares plenty with the Tundra, including its drivetrain and interior. Toyota did cater the Sequoia towards family usage with an independent rear suspension with available air ride rather than the Tundra’s solid axle and leaf springs. Yet despite the differences, the Sequoia still felt like a truck. In practice though, many full-size SUV customers were into that sort of thing. It fosters a sense of invincibility and a go-anywhere attitude.
Well, so long as there’s a gas station close by.

Continue reading for our full review.

Exterior

  • New grille design
  • New LED headlights with DRLs
  • LED fog lights
  • Roll-down rear window
  • Standard trailering equipment
  • Available aluminum front skid plate

2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764296
“The Toyota Sequoia’s 2018 refresh is about as mild as a refresh can get”

The Toyota Sequoia’s 2018 refresh is about as mild as a refresh can get. The grille has a slightly sharper appearance with new horizontal slats and accents that help incorporate the new headlights. Those headlights are new, too, with both low and high beams getting LED bulbs and new LED daytime running lights. More LEDs are found in the reshaped fog lights, too. The fog light surrounds are new, as is the black panel in the center of the bumper for the adaptive cruise control and pre-collision with pedestrian detection and automatic braking systems.

Around to the sides, the Sequoia carries the same appearance as before. Sadly, Toyota didn’t give the Sequoia the same updates it gave the 2014 Tundra. The pickup went from a bulbous, plump design to a more cut and muscular appearance. The Sequoia still looks bloated and overweight. The story continues out back, too. The same roundish taillights, the tacky reflectors in the bumper, and overall design carries over from a decade ago.


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764293
“Of course, looks aren’t everything. Objectively, the Sequoia offers plenty to be proud of”

Of course, looks aren’t everything. Objectively, the Sequoia offers plenty to be proud of. Up front are easily accessible tow hooks protected by an optional $425 aluminum skid plate. Side steps make it easy for smaller kids to climb inside. A two-inch receiver hitch makes towing easy, aided by both four- and seven-pin wiring connectors. And perhaps the coolest feature is the roll-down rear window. A button on the dash sends the rear glass into the tailgate for a completely open-air driving experience. Both the Tundra and 4Runner have this feature, too. Why other SUVs lack this trick is beyond us. It really adds to the experience when driving with the windows down. The Sequoia also enjoys a healthy ground clearance, making it actually capable of doing more than “mall crawling.”

Interior

  • Updated gauge cluster
  • New monotone dash color
  • Seating for seven
  • Rear seat DVD player
  • Heated, reclining second-row captain’s chairs
  • Heated, vented front seats
  • 19 cubic feet of cargo space behind third row
  • 120 cubic feet of cargo space behind first row

2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764325
“Toyota did very little to bring the Sequoia into modern times”

As little as the exterior changed, so too did the Sequoia’s interior. Toyota did very little to bring the Sequoia into modern times. There is no big infotainment screen or in-dash technologies like Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, or Wi-Fi hotspot. There is no wireless phone charger or bank of USB ports. Rather, the Sequoia is stuck with a low-resolution 6.1-inch touchscreen, a 4.2-inch TFT display in the gauge cluster, one USB port on the dash, and a design that literally dates back a decade. Yep, this is the same split-style dash found in the 2007 – 2013 Toyota Tundra and in every Sequoia since 2008.

Laughably, the 4.2-inch screen is part of the “upgraded” tech for 2018. The screen offers the bare bones of what other premium full-size SUVs come with. The Chevrolet Tahoe and Suburban, GMC Yukon, Cadillac Escalade, and Ford Expedition all have 8.0-inch configurable displays in their gauge clusters. Only the Nissan Armada has a less impressive screen.


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764329
“The infotainment screen is also far away, making it hard to use without leaning forward and stretching out”

Aside from the dated appearance, the dashboard’s layout leads to some odd ergonomics. The HVAC controls are spread out, making adjustments rather difficult for short-armed people. The infotainment screen is also far away, making it hard to use without leaning forward and stretching out. Adjusting the radio tuning feels like holding a crunch at the gym. Perhaps a core workout isn’t a terrible idea for most Americans, but doing so behind the wheel isn’t ideal.

Harping aside, the Sequoia’s interior does provide plenty of room for seven people. Drop the number to six with only two people in the third row, and the comfort level improves even more. Legroom in all seating positions is extremely impressive, as is hip, shoulder, and headroom. Make no mistake, the Sequoia is big and its occupants reap the benefits.


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764317
“The Platinum trim makes the second-row bench seat turn into captain’s chairs with a large center console”

The Platinum trim makes the second-row bench seat turn into captain’s chairs with a large center console. The console offers cup holders down low, buttons for the seat heaters, and a storage compartment up top. What’s more, the console’s lid will flip forward to allow for a flat load floor with all the seats folded. In this position, a plastic tray can be lifted up, revealing even more storage in the bottom of the console. Adding to the comfort levels of the second row are reclinable seatbacks.

Another bonus to the Sequoia’s cavernous interior is its cargo volume. There are 18.9 cubic feet of cargo space behind the third row. At the push of a button, the third row folds flat, pushing the cargo area up to 66.6 cubic feet. With the second-row bucket seats folded flat and the center console’s lid flipped forward, the Sequoia will swallow an impressive 120.1 cubic feet of cargo. That’s extremely impressive considering the Sequoia is shorter than the Chevy Suburban, but only has 1.6 cubic feet less than the ‘burb.

Drivetrain

  • 5.7-liter V-8
  • Six-speed automatic transmission
  • Part-time 4WD
  • Lockable Torsen limited center differential
  • Four-wheel independent suspension
  • Adaptive shock absorbers
  • Adjustable rear air ride suspension
  • 381 horsepower & 401 pound-feet of torque
  • EPA-estimated 13 city, 17 hwy, 14 comb.

2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764340
“The SUV still uses the same engine, transmission, and suspension setup as it did in 2008”

If you’re paying attention, you’ll probably spot a trend with the 2018 Toyota Sequoia: noting major changes, including the drivetrain. The SUV still uses the same engine, transmission, and suspension setup as it did in 2008. It’s also the same engine and transmission found in the 2007 – 2018 Tundra, too.

Despite its age, the 5.7-liter iForce V-8 makes 381 horsepower 5,600 rpm and 401 pound-feet of torque at 3,600 rpm. Toyota says the engine reaches 90 percent of peak torque before 2,200 rpm, meaning it doesn’t need to be revved out to make power. Impressively, the V-8 doesn’t mind revving, though. It has dual overhead cams that use variable valve timing on both the intake and exhaust sides. When pushed, the V-8 wakes up and moves.


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764337
“Power is managed by a six-speed automatic transmission that gives surprisingly smooth shifts and seamlessly fades into the background when driving”

Power is managed by a six-speed automatic transmission that gives surprisingly smooth shifts and seamlessly fades into the background when driving. A part-time transfer case on 4WD models handles the power distribution between the front and rear wheels. The Sequoia is rear-wheel drive during normal driving but can be shifted into 4WD while underway. Shifting into 4WD Low range does require a full stop and shifting the transmission into neutral, but the process still happens pretty quickly.

Of course, low range is best used for climbing over steep terrain, blasting through sand or mud, and pulling heavy loads at walking-pace speeds. Towing a boat up a slippery ramp is a perfect example. If the going gets really slippery, the Torsen center differential can be locked into providing a 50/50 power split between the front and rear axles.


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764290
“The EPA estimates the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum in 4WD to get 13 mpg in the city, 17 mpg on the highway, and 14 mpg combined”

Toyota does give the Sequoia some electronic traction aids, too. The A-TRAC system is activated by pressing the traction control button shorter than three seconds. The system then uses individual brake controls to stop a wheel from spinning and therefore sending power to the opposite wheel. It’s basically an electronic form of locking differentials. Even the Jeep Wrangler uses a similar system. The result is a surprisingly capable SUV, despite its size and weight.

The downside to this old-school form of powertrain is fuel economy. The EPA estimates the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum in 4WD to get 13 mpg in the city, 17 mpg on the highway, and 14 mpg combined. During our week of testing, we managed between 13 and 15.5 mpg, depending on how much highway driving we did.

And while the 5.7-liter does have dual overhead cams, four valves per cylinder, and variable valve timing, it lacks several of the fuel-saving features found on the competition. It does not have cylinder deactivation, direct fuel injection, or an automatic start/stop system. We are glad it foregoes that last system, though. The Sequoia also uses an insanely stout 4.30:1 rear axle ratio. That’s more gearing than most heavy-duty pickups use.

Suspension System


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764345
“The Toyota Sequoia rides on a four-wheel independent suspension system and boasts driver-adjustable dampers and an auto-leveling rear air suspension with a manual override”

The Toyota Sequoia rides on a four-wheel independent suspension system and boasts driver-adjustable dampers and an auto-leveling rear air suspension with a manual override. The shocks have three settings to choose from: Sport, Normal, and Comfort. Surprisingly, the different modes actually make a big difference in the Sequoia’s feel. Comfort mode has a smooth, floaty ride that is best enjoyed over rough roads and in off-road situations. Around corners, Comfort mode is too soft and allows noticeable levels of body roll. Turn the dash-mounted knob to Sport mode, and the suspension firms up nicely. Interstate on-ramps can be taken at a brisk pace without feeling top heavy as the big Sequoia remains impressively flat. The suspension becomes firmer over rough pavement, but not so much as to loosen grandma’s fillings. Normal mode does a good job of splitting the difference.

As for the rear air suspension, the system can be raised or lowered, with the normal position being between the two extremes. The system does take a minute or so to adjust to a new ride height, so don’t expect Range Rover levels of suspension adjustment speed. Hitching up a heavy trailer or carrying heavy cargo results in adjustment from the airbags, too. This allows the Sequoia to remain balanced under load rather than having a noise-up appearance, which also decreases safety.

Behind the Wheel


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764306
“The Toyota Sequoia is the oldest body-on-frame, three-row SUV on the market today, and it drives just as you’d imagine”

The Toyota Sequoia is the oldest body-on-frame, three-row SUV on the market today, and it drives just as you’d imagine. Honestly, though, as an automotive enthusiast, feeling all the traditional SUV vibes, tall stance on the road, and big V-8 under the hood is rather lovable. The V-8 pulls hard at lower revs but isn’t afraid to swing its tachometer towards 6,000 rpm. As mentioned, the transmission does its job rather well without being noticed. Too bad it needs at least two more gears to be competitive in the premium SUV segment.

Adjust the suspension into Sport mode, and the Sequoia is actually pretty fun to drive. Its tall ride height gives a fantastic view over the road and its large windows make seeing out easy. Better still, the large side mirrors combine with the tall ride to make the wide Sequoia feel narrower than it is. We never felt uncomfortable driving on two-lane roads. About the only downsides to outward visibility is the second-row DVD system blocks the rearview mirror when in use and the absence of a 360-degree camera system – or even a forward camera. A rearview camera and parking sensors are all Toyota supplies.

The Sequoia’s sweet spot is highway cruising. Set the adaptive cruise control, turn the adaptive dampers to Normal, and sit back and enjoy the ride. The Sequoia can make speed deceptive, too, so it’s best to rely on the cruise control if you have a heavy right foot.

Pricing


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764299

Toyota has increased prices for the 2018 Sequoia due to the updates it has. The 2017 model started at $45,560 and the 2018 starts at $48,300 – a $2,740 difference. Four trim levels are available for 2018: the SR5, TRD Sport, Limited, and Platinum.

The new-for-2018 TRD Sport starts at $54,240 and includes a monochromatic exterior treatment, seven-passenger seating, 20-inch wheels, LED exterior lighting, and the option to get Toyota’s Entune navigation system.

As for the range-topping Platinum model, it starts at $67,235 and includes the rear-seat Blu-ray DVD player, Blind Spot Monitoring with Lane Change Assist, Entune with navigation and an upgraded JBL audio system, and heated and vented front seats.

Our tester came with four options. The carpeted floor mats and door sill protectors cost a whopping $335; the cargo cover costs $245, the front skid plate costs $425, and the clear paint protection film on the Sequoia’s nose costs $395. Add on the $1,295 destination price, and our 2018 Toyota Sequoia costs $69,930.

The Competition

2018 Chevrolet Tahoe


2015 Chevrolet Tahoe - image 523435

Like the Toyota Sequoia, the Chevy Tahoe is a body-on-frame, full-size SUV based on a half-ton pickup truck. In the Tahoe’s case, it’s the Chevy Silverado 1500. The two share a similar frame, the same V-8 powertrain, and many of the same buttons, screens, menus, and smaller details. The Tahoe seats up to eight people – seven with the second-row buckets. Chevy keeps the area between the captain’s chairs clear to make access to the third row much easier. The Tahoe’s top trim level, the Premiere, comes with all the bells and whistles like heated and vented front seats, a nice 8.0-inch MyLink infotainment system (with a hidden storage compartment behind the screen) tri-zone climate controls, and a slew of active safety features. Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, Wi-Fi hotspot and wireless phone charging are all present.

The Chevy Tahoe comes standard with the 5.3-liter EcoTec3 V-8 making 355 horsepower and 383 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic does the shifting and a part-time 4WD system with an auto mode is available. (It’s worth noting the GMC Yukon is available with and the Cadillac Escalade comes standard with an eight-speed automatic transmission.) The Tahoe is available with GM’s swanky Magnetic Ride Control and uses a solid rear axle with a multi-link coil spring suspension.

Pricing for the 2018 Chevy Tahoe starts at $48,510 with the LS trim. The mid-grade LT starts at $53,750 and the range-topping Premier starts at $63,435.

Read our full review on the 2018 Chevrolet Tahoe.

2018 Ford Expedition


2018 Ford Expedition - image 704776

The Ford Expedition is the newest member of this bunch, having been completely redesigned for 2018. The SUV adopts Ford’s aluminum body panels and a similar high-strength steel frame that underpins the 2018 F-150. The interior also borrows from the F-150 by using its dashboard and in-dash technology. SYNC 3 includes features like a 360-degree camera system, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, Wi-Fi, and new features like FordPass and Ford+Alexa.

Power comes from Ford’s 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 making an impressive 375 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque. A 10-speed automatic transmission sends power to the rear wheels, or to all four wheels with the optional 4WD system. Fuel economy is EPA-estimated at 17 mpg city, 24 mpg highway, and 20 mpg combined with RWD versions and 17/22/19 on 4WD models. Like the Sequoia, the Expedition uses a four-wheel independent suspension system. Optional adaptive dampers can be had.

Prices for the Ford reach into the high-end segment of the SUV market. The “base” XLT trim starts at $51,695; the Limited starts T 462,585; and the swanky Platinum starts at $72,710.

Read our full review on the 2018 Ford Expedition.

Conclusion


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764291

The 2018 Toyota Sequoia might not be the newest or most sophisticated SUV on the market, but it still offers an impressive level of interior comfort and vast amounts of space. Its powerful V-8 and ladder frame backbone allows it to pull 7,400 pounds on its hitch while the optional 4WD system allows it to explore more than just the mall parking lot.

For all the Sequoia’s shortcomings (and there are plenty), the SUV has an endearing quality that – when driven without comparison to the other SUVs in the segment – makes for a loveable experience behind the wheel. For parents with a lot of kids, the Sequoia offers tons of space while older passengers will enjoy the comforts brought on thanks to the generous legroom in all three rows.

Sadly, most car shoppers aren’t buying in a vacuum; compared to the others, the Sequoia is simply outdated. It’s a shame, really, why Toyota refuses to truly update the Sequoia (and the Tundra, for that matter) to make it more competitive. It seems the company’s full attention is focused on the Corolla, Camry, Avalon, RAV4, and Highlander rather than the other vehicles in its lineup. Granted, those vehicles garner the most sales, but perhaps the Sequoia would too if not a decade old. Just look at the first generation Sequoia – the first generation sold more than 70,000 examples in its first year back in 2002. Now, this petrified redwood only found 12,156 homes in 2017.

We simply can’t see spending nearly $70,000 on an SUV that’s so far behind and averages only 14 mpg combined. There are simply too many competitors with more to offer.

  • Leave it
    • * Outdated despite 2018 refresh
    • * Gets very expensive
    • * Too many competitors with modern features

References

Toyota Sequoia


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764290

What it’s Like to Daily Drive the 2018 Toyota Sequoia


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764305

Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764295

What’s New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764340

The 2018 Toyota Sequoia is Thirsty


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764296

The Toyota Sequoia is Old-School Cool


2008 Toyota Sequoia - image 213843

Read our full review on the 2017 Toyota Sequoia.


maker logos - image 741755

Read more Toyota news.

PostHeaderIcon Toyota Sequoia – Driven

The Toyota Sequoia is alive and kicking. You’re forgiven if you’ve forgotten, even despite Toyota giving the full-size SUV a slight update for 2018. The Sequoia’s sales pale in comparison to its rivals, and as such, there are simply fewer on the road. But that doesn’t mean the Sequoia is a bad SUV, right? We decided to have a look.

Our tester came decked out with all the extra goodies thanks to the range-topping Platinum trim. Of course, it also carried all the update Toyota gave it for the 2018 model year, including a new nose, a revised gauge cluster, and the now-standard Toyota Safety Sense-P active safety system. Beyond that, however, the 2018 Sequoia looks and feels nearly identically to the 2008 version.

It’s hard to believe the Sequoia’s second-generation is now a decade old. It harks back to Toyota’s major revamp of the Tundra pickup. It changed to a full-size truck for the 2007 model year and the Sequoia followed suit the next year. The Sequoia shares plenty with the Tundra, including its drivetrain and interior. Toyota did cater the Sequoia towards family usage with an independent rear suspension with available air ride rather than the Tundra’s solid axle and leaf springs. Yet despite the differences, the Sequoia still felt like a truck. In practice though, many full-size SUV customers were into that sort of thing. It fosters a sense of invincibility and a go-anywhere attitude.
Well, so long as there’s a gas station close by.

Continue reading for our full review.

Exterior

  • New grille design
  • New LED headlights with DRLs
  • LED fog lights
  • Roll-down rear window
  • Standard trailering equipment
  • Available aluminum front skid plate

2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764296
“The Toyota Sequoia’s 2018 refresh is about as mild as a refresh can get”

The Toyota Sequoia’s 2018 refresh is about as mild as a refresh can get. The grille has a slightly sharper appearance with new horizontal slats and accents that help incorporate the new headlights. Those headlights are new, too, with both low and high beams getting LED bulbs and new LED daytime running lights. More LEDs are found in the reshaped fog lights, too. The fog light surrounds are new, as is the black panel in the center of the bumper for the adaptive cruise control and pre-collision with pedestrian detection and automatic braking systems.

Around to the sides, the Sequoia carries the same appearance as before. Sadly, Toyota didn’t give the Sequoia the same updates it gave the 2014 Tundra. The pickup went from a bulbous, plump design to a more cut and muscular appearance. The Sequoia still looks bloated and overweight. The story continues out back, too. The same roundish taillights, the tacky reflectors in the bumper, and overall design carries over from a decade ago.


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764293
“Of course, looks aren’t everything. Objectively, the Sequoia offers plenty to be proud of”

Of course, looks aren’t everything. Objectively, the Sequoia offers plenty to be proud of. Up front are easily accessible tow hooks protected by an optional $425 aluminum skid plate. Side steps make it easy for smaller kids to climb inside. A two-inch receiver hitch makes towing easy, aided by both four- and seven-pin wiring connectors. And perhaps the coolest feature is the roll-down rear window. A button on the dash sends the rear glass into the tailgate for a completely open-air driving experience. Both the Tundra and 4Runner have this feature, too. Why other SUVs lack this trick is beyond us. It really adds to the experience when driving with the windows down. The Sequoia also enjoys a healthy ground clearance, making it actually capable of doing more than “mall crawling.”

Interior

  • Updated gauge cluster
  • New monotone dash color
  • Seating for seven
  • Rear seat DVD player
  • Heated, reclining second-row captain’s chairs
  • Heated, vented front seats
  • 19 cubic feet of cargo space behind third row
  • 120 cubic feet of cargo space behind first row

2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764325
“Toyota did very little to bring the Sequoia into modern times”

As little as the exterior changed, so too did the Sequoia’s interior. Toyota did very little to bring the Sequoia into modern times. There is no big infotainment screen or in-dash technologies like Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, or Wi-Fi hotspot. There is no wireless phone charger or bank of USB ports. Rather, the Sequoia is stuck with a low-resolution 6.1-inch touchscreen, a 4.2-inch TFT display in the gauge cluster, one USB port on the dash, and a design that literally dates back a decade. Yep, this is the same split-style dash found in the 2007 – 2013 Toyota Tundra and in every Sequoia since 2008.

Laughably, the 4.2-inch screen is part of the “upgraded” tech for 2018. The screen offers the bare bones of what other premium full-size SUVs come with. The Chevrolet Tahoe and Suburban, GMC Yukon, Cadillac Escalade, and Ford Expedition all have 8.0-inch configurable displays in their gauge clusters. Only the Nissan Armada has a less impressive screen.


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764329
“The infotainment screen is also far away, making it hard to use without leaning forward and stretching out”

Aside from the dated appearance, the dashboard’s layout leads to some odd ergonomics. The HVAC controls are spread out, making adjustments rather difficult for short-armed people. The infotainment screen is also far away, making it hard to use without leaning forward and stretching out. Adjusting the radio tuning feels like holding a crunch at the gym. Perhaps a core workout isn’t a terrible idea for most Americans, but doing so behind the wheel isn’t ideal.

Harping aside, the Sequoia’s interior does provide plenty of room for seven people. Drop the number to six with only two people in the third row, and the comfort level improves even more. Legroom in all seating positions is extremely impressive, as is hip, shoulder, and headroom. Make no mistake, the Sequoia is big and its occupants reap the benefits.


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764317
“The Platinum trim makes the second-row bench seat turn into captain’s chairs with a large center console”

The Platinum trim makes the second-row bench seat turn into captain’s chairs with a large center console. The console offers cup holders down low, buttons for the seat heaters, and a storage compartment up top. What’s more, the console’s lid will flip forward to allow for a flat load floor with all the seats folded. In this position, a plastic tray can be lifted up, revealing even more storage in the bottom of the console. Adding to the comfort levels of the second row are reclinable seatbacks.

Another bonus to the Sequoia’s cavernous interior is its cargo volume. There are 18.9 cubic feet of cargo space behind the third row. At the push of a button, the third row folds flat, pushing the cargo area up to 66.6 cubic feet. With the second-row bucket seats folded flat and the center console’s lid flipped forward, the Sequoia will swallow an impressive 120.1 cubic feet of cargo. That’s extremely impressive considering the Sequoia is shorter than the Chevy Suburban, but only has 1.6 cubic feet less than the ‘burb.

Drivetrain

  • 5.7-liter V-8
  • Six-speed automatic transmission
  • Part-time 4WD
  • Lockable Torsen limited center differential
  • Four-wheel independent suspension
  • Adaptive shock absorbers
  • Adjustable rear air ride suspension
  • 381 horsepower & 401 pound-feet of torque
  • EPA-estimated 13 city, 17 hwy, 14 comb.

2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764340
“The SUV still uses the same engine, transmission, and suspension setup as it did in 2008”

If you’re paying attention, you’ll probably spot a trend with the 2018 Toyota Sequoia: noting major changes, including the drivetrain. The SUV still uses the same engine, transmission, and suspension setup as it did in 2008. It’s also the same engine and transmission found in the 2007 – 2018 Tundra, too.

Despite its age, the 5.7-liter iForce V-8 makes 381 horsepower 5,600 rpm and 401 pound-feet of torque at 3,600 rpm. Toyota says the engine reaches 90 percent of peak torque before 2,200 rpm, meaning it doesn’t need to be revved out to make power. Impressively, the V-8 doesn’t mind revving, though. It has dual overhead cams that use variable valve timing on both the intake and exhaust sides. When pushed, the V-8 wakes up and moves.


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764337
“Power is managed by a six-speed automatic transmission that gives surprisingly smooth shifts and seamlessly fades into the background when driving”

Power is managed by a six-speed automatic transmission that gives surprisingly smooth shifts and seamlessly fades into the background when driving. A part-time transfer case on 4WD models handles the power distribution between the front and rear wheels. The Sequoia is rear-wheel drive during normal driving but can be shifted into 4WD while underway. Shifting into 4WD Low range does require a full stop and shifting the transmission into neutral, but the process still happens pretty quickly.

Of course, low range is best used for climbing over steep terrain, blasting through sand or mud, and pulling heavy loads at walking-pace speeds. Towing a boat up a slippery ramp is a perfect example. If the going gets really slippery, the Torsen center differential can be locked into providing a 50/50 power split between the front and rear axles.


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764290
“The EPA estimates the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum in 4WD to get 13 mpg in the city, 17 mpg on the highway, and 14 mpg combined”

Toyota does give the Sequoia some electronic traction aids, too. The A-TRAC system is activated by pressing the traction control button shorter than three seconds. The system then uses individual brake controls to stop a wheel from spinning and therefore sending power to the opposite wheel. It’s basically an electronic form of locking differentials. Even the Jeep Wrangler uses a similar system. The result is a surprisingly capable SUV, despite its size and weight.

The downside to this old-school form of powertrain is fuel economy. The EPA estimates the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum in 4WD to get 13 mpg in the city, 17 mpg on the highway, and 14 mpg combined. During our week of testing, we managed between 13 and 15.5 mpg, depending on how much highway driving we did.

And while the 5.7-liter does have dual overhead cams, four valves per cylinder, and variable valve timing, it lacks several of the fuel-saving features found on the competition. It does not have cylinder deactivation, direct fuel injection, or an automatic start/stop system. We are glad it foregoes that last system, though. The Sequoia also uses an insanely stout 4.30:1 rear axle ratio. That’s more gearing than most heavy-duty pickups use.

Suspension System


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764345
“The Toyota Sequoia rides on a four-wheel independent suspension system and boasts driver-adjustable dampers and an auto-leveling rear air suspension with a manual override”

The Toyota Sequoia rides on a four-wheel independent suspension system and boasts driver-adjustable dampers and an auto-leveling rear air suspension with a manual override. The shocks have three settings to choose from: Sport, Normal, and Comfort. Surprisingly, the different modes actually make a big difference in the Sequoia’s feel. Comfort mode has a smooth, floaty ride that is best enjoyed over rough roads and in off-road situations. Around corners, Comfort mode is too soft and allows noticeable levels of body roll. Turn the dash-mounted knob to Sport mode, and the suspension firms up nicely. Interstate on-ramps can be taken at a brisk pace without feeling top heavy as the big Sequoia remains impressively flat. The suspension becomes firmer over rough pavement, but not so much as to loosen grandma’s fillings. Normal mode does a good job of splitting the difference.

As for the rear air suspension, the system can be raised or lowered, with the normal position being between the two extremes. The system does take a minute or so to adjust to a new ride height, so don’t expect Range Rover levels of suspension adjustment speed. Hitching up a heavy trailer or carrying heavy cargo results in adjustment from the airbags, too. This allows the Sequoia to remain balanced under load rather than having a noise-up appearance, which also decreases safety.

Behind the Wheel


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764306
“The Toyota Sequoia is the oldest body-on-frame, three-row SUV on the market today, and it drives just as you’d imagine”

The Toyota Sequoia is the oldest body-on-frame, three-row SUV on the market today, and it drives just as you’d imagine. Honestly, though, as an automotive enthusiast, feeling all the traditional SUV vibes, tall stance on the road, and big V-8 under the hood is rather lovable. The V-8 pulls hard at lower revs but isn’t afraid to swing its tachometer towards 6,000 rpm. As mentioned, the transmission does its job rather well without being noticed. Too bad it needs at least two more gears to be competitive in the premium SUV segment.

Adjust the suspension into Sport mode, and the Sequoia is actually pretty fun to drive. Its tall ride height gives a fantastic view over the road and its large windows make seeing out easy. Better still, the large side mirrors combine with the tall ride to make the wide Sequoia feel narrower than it is. We never felt uncomfortable driving on two-lane roads. About the only downsides to outward visibility is the second-row DVD system blocks the rearview mirror when in use and the absence of a 360-degree camera system – or even a forward camera. A rearview camera and parking sensors are all Toyota supplies.

The Sequoia’s sweet spot is highway cruising. Set the adaptive cruise control, turn the adaptive dampers to Normal, and sit back and enjoy the ride. The Sequoia can make speed deceptive, too, so it’s best to rely on the cruise control if you have a heavy right foot.

Pricing


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764299

Toyota has increased prices for the 2018 Sequoia due to the updates it has. The 2017 model started at $45,560 and the 2018 starts at $48,300 – a $2,740 difference. Four trim levels are available for 2018: the SR5, TRD Sport, Limited, and Platinum.

The new-for-2018 TRD Sport starts at $54,240 and includes a monochromatic exterior treatment, seven-passenger seating, 20-inch wheels, LED exterior lighting, and the option to get Toyota’s Entune navigation system.

As for the range-topping Platinum model, it starts at $67,235 and includes the rear-seat Blu-ray DVD player, Blind Spot Monitoring with Lane Change Assist, Entune with navigation and an upgraded JBL audio system, and heated and vented front seats.

Our tester came with four options. The carpeted floor mats and door sill protectors cost a whopping $335; the cargo cover costs $245, the front skid plate costs $425, and the clear paint protection film on the Sequoia’s nose costs $395. Add on the $1,295 destination price, and our 2018 Toyota Sequoia costs $69,930.

The Competition

2018 Chevrolet Tahoe


2015 Chevrolet Tahoe - image 523435

Like the Toyota Sequoia, the Chevy Tahoe is a body-on-frame, full-size SUV based on a half-ton pickup truck. In the Tahoe’s case, it’s the Chevy Silverado 1500. The two share a similar frame, the same V-8 powertrain, and many of the same buttons, screens, menus, and smaller details. The Tahoe seats up to eight people – seven with the second-row buckets. Chevy keeps the area between the captain’s chairs clear to make access to the third row much easier. The Tahoe’s top trim level, the Premiere, comes with all the bells and whistles like heated and vented front seats, a nice 8.0-inch MyLink infotainment system (with a hidden storage compartment behind the screen) tri-zone climate controls, and a slew of active safety features. Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, Wi-Fi hotspot and wireless phone charging are all present.

The Chevy Tahoe comes standard with the 5.3-liter EcoTec3 V-8 making 355 horsepower and 383 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic does the shifting and a part-time 4WD system with an auto mode is available. (It’s worth noting the GMC Yukon is available with and the Cadillac Escalade comes standard with an eight-speed automatic transmission.) The Tahoe is available with GM’s swanky Magnetic Ride Control and uses a solid rear axle with a multi-link coil spring suspension.

Pricing for the 2018 Chevy Tahoe starts at $48,510 with the LS trim. The mid-grade LT starts at $53,750 and the range-topping Premier starts at $63,435.

Read our full review on the 2018 Chevrolet Tahoe.

2018 Ford Expedition


2018 Ford Expedition - image 704776

The Ford Expedition is the newest member of this bunch, having been completely redesigned for 2018. The SUV adopts Ford’s aluminum body panels and a similar high-strength steel frame that underpins the 2018 F-150. The interior also borrows from the F-150 by using its dashboard and in-dash technology. SYNC 3 includes features like a 360-degree camera system, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, Wi-Fi, and new features like FordPass and Ford+Alexa.

Power comes from Ford’s 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6 making an impressive 375 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque. A 10-speed automatic transmission sends power to the rear wheels, or to all four wheels with the optional 4WD system. Fuel economy is EPA-estimated at 17 mpg city, 24 mpg highway, and 20 mpg combined with RWD versions and 17/22/19 on 4WD models. Like the Sequoia, the Expedition uses a four-wheel independent suspension system. Optional adaptive dampers can be had.

Prices for the Ford reach into the high-end segment of the SUV market. The “base” XLT trim starts at $51,695; the Limited starts T 462,585; and the swanky Platinum starts at $72,710.

Read our full review on the 2018 Ford Expedition.

Conclusion


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764291

The 2018 Toyota Sequoia might not be the newest or most sophisticated SUV on the market, but it still offers an impressive level of interior comfort and vast amounts of space. Its powerful V-8 and ladder frame backbone allows it to pull 7,400 pounds on its hitch while the optional 4WD system allows it to explore more than just the mall parking lot.

For all the Sequoia’s shortcomings (and there are plenty), the SUV has an endearing quality that – when driven without comparison to the other SUVs in the segment – makes for a loveable experience behind the wheel. For parents with a lot of kids, the Sequoia offers tons of space while older passengers will enjoy the comforts brought on thanks to the generous legroom in all three rows.

Sadly, most car shoppers aren’t buying in a vacuum; compared to the others, the Sequoia is simply outdated. It’s a shame, really, why Toyota refuses to truly update the Sequoia (and the Tundra, for that matter) to make it more competitive. It seems the company’s full attention is focused on the Corolla, Camry, Avalon, RAV4, and Highlander rather than the other vehicles in its lineup. Granted, those vehicles garner the most sales, but perhaps the Sequoia would too if not a decade old. Just look at the first generation Sequoia – the first generation sold more than 70,000 examples in its first year back in 2002. Now, this petrified redwood only found 12,156 homes in 2017.

We simply can’t see spending nearly $70,000 on an SUV that’s so far behind and averages only 14 mpg combined. There are simply too many competitors with more to offer.

  • Leave it
    • * Outdated despite 2018 refresh
    • * Gets very expensive
    • * Too many competitors with modern features

References

Toyota Sequoia


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764290

What it’s Like to Daily Drive the 2018 Toyota Sequoia


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764305

Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764295

What’s New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764340

The 2018 Toyota Sequoia is Thirsty


2018 Toyota Sequoia - Driven - image 764296

The Toyota Sequoia is Old-School Cool


2008 Toyota Sequoia - image 213843

Read our full review on the 2017 Toyota Sequoia.


maker logos - image 741755

Read more Toyota news.

PostHeaderIcon Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum

Toyota’s truck-based, full-size SUV, the Sequoia, is big. Its exterior dimensions are imposing and its interior volume feels like the vastness of an airplane hanger. The three-row SUV boasts seating for up to eight people and has an impressive amount of cargo area. This week we’re testing the refreshed 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum optioned with the Red Rock interior color. Standard with the Platinum trim is the second-row captain’s chairs with the center console. That might reduce the Sequoia’s seating to seven, but it adds an air of luxury not had with the bench seat.

The Sequoia has a 2+2+3 seating arrangement. While three across in the third row spells disaster is most crossovers, the girthy Sequoia has room enough for actual people back here. There’s even an impressive amount of legroom thanks to the sliding second-row bucket seats.

There’s more to the Sequoia’s interior, so keep reading for our impressions.

Continue reading for more information.

Room Galore


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764306
“The driver and front passenger enjoy 34.8 inches of headroom, a massive 66.4 inches of shoulder room, 62.5 inches of hip room, and 42.5 inches of legroom.”

The Sequoia’s dimensions haven’t changed with the mild 2018 refresh, but that’s a good thing. The SUV boasts tons of passenger and cargo room by every metric. Starting up front, the driver and front passenger enjoy 34.8 inches of headroom, a massive 66.4 inches of shoulder room, 62.5 inches of hip room, and 42.5 inches of legroom.

While spacious, the Sequoia does have some ergonomic issues the driver must overcome. Those with shorter legs will wish for power-adjustable pedals; they are placed too far forward and require a seating position too close to the dash. The power-adjustable steering column does help, though. The wide dash also presents an issue with reaching far-flung controls like the radio tuning knob and the passenger-side temperature controls. Lastly, the front seats offer no real height control, so taller folks might be left wishing for a lower seating position. Shorter folks will probably just fine.


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764307
“The second row is even more spacious”

Aside from those issues, the Sequoia provides ample room for NBA-sized people.

The second row is even more spacious. In fact, the twin captain’s chairs are the best seats in the house. Slide the chairs to their rearmost position, and there is an impressive 40.9 inches of legroom. Shoulder room measures 65.6 inches and would easily accommodate a bodybuilder’s physique. Hip room measures 59.9 inches and headroom comes in at 34.9 inches.

Second-row passengers enjoy heated seats in the Platinum trim, along with a multifunction center console. It boasts two cup holders, a top storage area, a huge storage cubby down low, and in the middle, a forward-folding lid that allows for flat storage of items when the second- and third-row seats are folded flat.

The Platinum trim also comes standard with the overhead 9.0-inch DVD player.

The Sequoia’s third row is split 60/40 style and is power operated. Toyota was kind enough to include power controls in the cargo area and on the wheel well near the second-row seats. This makes adjusting the seats super convenient. The action is also respectably quick and quiet.


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764308
“It offers 18.9 cubic feet behind the third row, 66.6 cubic feet behind the second row, and with both rows folded flat, the Sequoia will haul 120.1 cubic feet of cargo”

With the third row in place, three average size people have plenty of room, though trips are more comfortable when limited to two passengers. With the second row seats scooted forward, the third row has 35.3 inches of legroom. Hip room is tighter, measuring 50.4 inches and 65.7 inches for shoulder room Headroom is still generous at 34.5 inches – only 0.3 inches shy of the first row’s headroom.

Of course, the Sequoia wouldn’t be a proper SUV without loads of cargo room. It offers 18.9 cubic feet behind the third row, 66.6 cubic feet behind the second row, and with both rows folded flat, the Sequoia will haul 120.1 cubic feet of cargo.

A moderately sized storage compartment resides under the cargo floor, too, offering room for things like a trailer hitch, ropes, jumper cables, ice scrapers, and other odds and ends.

Lagging in Technology


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764328
“Toyota is holding the Sequoia back with an ancient 6.1-inch touchscreen running an outdated version of Entune”

There’s no doubting the 2018 Toyota Sequoia has a spacious interior, however, it also has a very out-of-date interior, as well. Despite getting a mild refresh for 2018, Toyota is holding the Sequoia back with an ancient 6.1-inch touchscreen running an outdated version of Entune. The small screen does offer GPS navigation, Bluetooth phone connectivity, satellite radio, and several of Toyota’s apps for things like fuel and traffic, but its list of have-nots is getting longer by the day.

The Entune system lacks Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, Wi-Fi connectivity, 3D mapping, IOT connectivity with a smartphone, and a 360-degree camera system. There is no wireless phone charger, either. These are things available on other Toyota vehicles, but despite the Sequoia Platinum’s $67,235 starting price, Toyota didn’t think it was necessary to include these common connectivity and convenience features. Strange.

All told, the Toyota Sequoia is a massive SUV in just about every respect. While it also comes with a massive price tag and thirst for gasoline, the big Yota does what smaller SUVs can’t.

Be sure to read our other coverage of the 2018 Toyota Sequoia. The links are below.

References

Toyota Sequoia


What's New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia - image 764295

What’s New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia


The 2018 Toyota Sequoia is Thirsty - image 764340

The 2018 Toyota Sequoia is Thirsty


What's New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia - image 764296

The Toyota Sequoia is Old-School Cool


2008 Toyota Sequoia - image 213843

Read our full review on the 2017 Toyota Sequoia.


maker logos - image 741755

Read more Toyota news.

PostHeaderIcon Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum

Toyota’s truck-based, full-size SUV, the Sequoia, is big. Its exterior dimensions are imposing and its interior volume feels like the vastness of an airplane hanger. The three-row SUV boasts seating for up to eight people and has an impressive amount of cargo area. This week we’re testing the refreshed 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum optioned with the Red Rock interior color. Standard with the Platinum trim is the second-row captain’s chairs with the center console. That might reduce the Sequoia’s seating to seven, but it adds an air of luxury not had with the bench seat.

The Sequoia has a 2+2+3 seating arrangement. While three across in the third row spells disaster is most crossovers, the girthy Sequoia has room enough for actual people back here. There’s even an impressive amount of legroom thanks to the sliding second-row bucket seats.

There’s more to the Sequoia’s interior, so keep reading for our impressions.

Continue reading for more information.

Room Galore


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764306
“The driver and front passenger enjoy 34.8 inches of headroom, a massive 66.4 inches of shoulder room, 62.5 inches of hip room, and 42.5 inches of legroom.”

The Sequoia’s dimensions haven’t changed with the mild 2018 refresh, but that’s a good thing. The SUV boasts tons of passenger and cargo room by every metric. Starting up front, the driver and front passenger enjoy 34.8 inches of headroom, a massive 66.4 inches of shoulder room, 62.5 inches of hip room, and 42.5 inches of legroom.

While spacious, the Sequoia does have some ergonomic issues the driver must overcome. Those with shorter legs will wish for power-adjustable pedals; they are placed too far forward and require a seating position too close to the dash. The power-adjustable steering column does help, though. The wide dash also presents an issue with reaching far-flung controls like the radio tuning knob and the passenger-side temperature controls. Lastly, the front seats offer no real height control, so taller folks might be left wishing for a lower seating position. Shorter folks will probably just fine.


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764307
“The second row is even more spacious”

Aside from those issues, the Sequoia provides ample room for NBA-sized people.

The second row is even more spacious. In fact, the twin captain’s chairs are the best seats in the house. Slide the chairs to their rearmost position, and there is an impressive 40.9 inches of legroom. Shoulder room measures 65.6 inches and would easily accommodate a bodybuilder’s physique. Hip room measures 59.9 inches and headroom comes in at 34.9 inches.

Second-row passengers enjoy heated seats in the Platinum trim, along with a multifunction center console. It boasts two cup holders, a top storage area, a huge storage cubby down low, and in the middle, a forward-folding lid that allows for flat storage of items when the second- and third-row seats are folded flat.

The Platinum trim also comes standard with the overhead 9.0-inch DVD player.

The Sequoia’s third row is split 60/40 style and is power operated. Toyota was kind enough to include power controls in the cargo area and on the wheel well near the second-row seats. This makes adjusting the seats super convenient. The action is also respectably quick and quiet.


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764308
“It offers 18.9 cubic feet behind the third row, 66.6 cubic feet behind the second row, and with both rows folded flat, the Sequoia will haul 120.1 cubic feet of cargo”

With the third row in place, three average size people have plenty of room, though trips are more comfortable when limited to two passengers. With the second row seats scooted forward, the third row has 35.3 inches of legroom. Hip room is tighter, measuring 50.4 inches and 65.7 inches for shoulder room Headroom is still generous at 34.5 inches – only 0.3 inches shy of the first row’s headroom.

Of course, the Sequoia wouldn’t be a proper SUV without loads of cargo room. It offers 18.9 cubic feet behind the third row, 66.6 cubic feet behind the second row, and with both rows folded flat, the Sequoia will haul 120.1 cubic feet of cargo.

A moderately sized storage compartment resides under the cargo floor, too, offering room for things like a trailer hitch, ropes, jumper cables, ice scrapers, and other odds and ends.

Lagging in Technology


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764328
“Toyota is holding the Sequoia back with an ancient 6.1-inch touchscreen running an outdated version of Entune”

There’s no doubting the 2018 Toyota Sequoia has a spacious interior, however, it also has a very out-of-date interior, as well. Despite getting a mild refresh for 2018, Toyota is holding the Sequoia back with an ancient 6.1-inch touchscreen running an outdated version of Entune. The small screen does offer GPS navigation, Bluetooth phone connectivity, satellite radio, and several of Toyota’s apps for things like fuel and traffic, but its list of have-nots is getting longer by the day.

The Entune system lacks Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, Wi-Fi connectivity, 3D mapping, IOT connectivity with a smartphone, and a 360-degree camera system. There is no wireless phone charger, either. These are things available on other Toyota vehicles, but despite the Sequoia Platinum’s $67,235 starting price, Toyota didn’t think it was necessary to include these common connectivity and convenience features. Strange.

All told, the Toyota Sequoia is a massive SUV in just about every respect. While it also comes with a massive price tag and thirst for gasoline, the big Yota does what smaller SUVs can’t.

Be sure to read our other coverage of the 2018 Toyota Sequoia. The links are below.

References

Toyota Sequoia


What's New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia - image 764295

What’s New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia


The 2018 Toyota Sequoia is Thirsty - image 764340

The 2018 Toyota Sequoia is Thirsty


What's New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia - image 764296

The Toyota Sequoia is Old-School Cool


2008 Toyota Sequoia - image 213843

Read our full review on the 2017 Toyota Sequoia.


maker logos - image 741755

Read more Toyota news.

PostHeaderIcon Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum

Toyota’s truck-based, full-size SUV, the Sequoia, is big. Its exterior dimensions are imposing and its interior volume feels like the vastness of an airplane hanger. The three-row SUV boasts seating for up to eight people and has an impressive amount of cargo area. This week we’re testing the refreshed 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum optioned with the Red Rock interior color. Standard with the Platinum trim is the second-row captain’s chairs with the center console. That might reduce the Sequoia’s seating to seven, but it adds an air of luxury not had with the bench seat.

The Sequoia has a 2+2+3 seating arrangement. While three across in the third row spells disaster is most crossovers, the girthy Sequoia has room enough for actual people back here. There’s even an impressive amount of legroom thanks to the sliding second-row bucket seats.

There’s more to the Sequoia’s interior, so keep reading for our impressions.

Continue reading for more information.

Room Galore


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764306
“The driver and front passenger enjoy 34.8 inches of headroom, a massive 66.4 inches of shoulder room, 62.5 inches of hip room, and 42.5 inches of legroom.”

The Sequoia’s dimensions haven’t changed with the mild 2018 refresh, but that’s a good thing. The SUV boasts tons of passenger and cargo room by every metric. Starting up front, the driver and front passenger enjoy 34.8 inches of headroom, a massive 66.4 inches of shoulder room, 62.5 inches of hip room, and 42.5 inches of legroom.

While spacious, the Sequoia does have some ergonomic issues the driver must overcome. Those with shorter legs will wish for power-adjustable pedals; they are placed too far forward and require a seating position too close to the dash. The power-adjustable steering column does help, though. The wide dash also presents an issue with reaching far-flung controls like the radio tuning knob and the passenger-side temperature controls. Lastly, the front seats offer no real height control, so taller folks might be left wishing for a lower seating position. Shorter folks will probably just fine.


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764307
“The second row is even more spacious”

Aside from those issues, the Sequoia provides ample room for NBA-sized people.

The second row is even more spacious. In fact, the twin captain’s chairs are the best seats in the house. Slide the chairs to their rearmost position, and there is an impressive 40.9 inches of legroom. Shoulder room measures 65.6 inches and would easily accommodate a bodybuilder’s physique. Hip room measures 59.9 inches and headroom comes in at 34.9 inches.

Second-row passengers enjoy heated seats in the Platinum trim, along with a multifunction center console. It boasts two cup holders, a top storage area, a huge storage cubby down low, and in the middle, a forward-folding lid that allows for flat storage of items when the second- and third-row seats are folded flat.

The Platinum trim also comes standard with the overhead 9.0-inch DVD player.

The Sequoia’s third row is split 60/40 style and is power operated. Toyota was kind enough to include power controls in the cargo area and on the wheel well near the second-row seats. This makes adjusting the seats super convenient. The action is also respectably quick and quiet.


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764308
“It offers 18.9 cubic feet behind the third row, 66.6 cubic feet behind the second row, and with both rows folded flat, the Sequoia will haul 120.1 cubic feet of cargo”

With the third row in place, three average size people have plenty of room, though trips are more comfortable when limited to two passengers. With the second row seats scooted forward, the third row has 35.3 inches of legroom. Hip room is tighter, measuring 50.4 inches and 65.7 inches for shoulder room Headroom is still generous at 34.5 inches – only 0.3 inches shy of the first row’s headroom.

Of course, the Sequoia wouldn’t be a proper SUV without loads of cargo room. It offers 18.9 cubic feet behind the third row, 66.6 cubic feet behind the second row, and with both rows folded flat, the Sequoia will haul 120.1 cubic feet of cargo.

A moderately sized storage compartment resides under the cargo floor, too, offering room for things like a trailer hitch, ropes, jumper cables, ice scrapers, and other odds and ends.

Lagging in Technology


Inside the 2018 Toyota Sequoia Platinum - image 764328
“Toyota is holding the Sequoia back with an ancient 6.1-inch touchscreen running an outdated version of Entune”

There’s no doubting the 2018 Toyota Sequoia has a spacious interior, however, it also has a very out-of-date interior, as well. Despite getting a mild refresh for 2018, Toyota is holding the Sequoia back with an ancient 6.1-inch touchscreen running an outdated version of Entune. The small screen does offer GPS navigation, Bluetooth phone connectivity, satellite radio, and several of Toyota’s apps for things like fuel and traffic, but its list of have-nots is getting longer by the day.

The Entune system lacks Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, Wi-Fi connectivity, 3D mapping, IOT connectivity with a smartphone, and a 360-degree camera system. There is no wireless phone charger, either. These are things available on other Toyota vehicles, but despite the Sequoia Platinum’s $67,235 starting price, Toyota didn’t think it was necessary to include these common connectivity and convenience features. Strange.

All told, the Toyota Sequoia is a massive SUV in just about every respect. While it also comes with a massive price tag and thirst for gasoline, the big Yota does what smaller SUVs can’t.

Be sure to read our other coverage of the 2018 Toyota Sequoia. The links are below.

References

Toyota Sequoia


What's New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia - image 764295

What’s New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia


The 2018 Toyota Sequoia is Thirsty - image 764340

The 2018 Toyota Sequoia is Thirsty


What's New on the 2018 Toyota Sequoia - image 764296

The Toyota Sequoia is Old-School Cool


2008 Toyota Sequoia - image 213843

Read our full review on the 2017 Toyota Sequoia.


maker logos - image 741755

Read more Toyota news.

PostHeaderIcon Ford Edge

The Ford Edge has been around since 2007 and its current generation debuted in 2015. But the second-generation Edge was getting a little, well, dull, so Ford has given the mid-size crossover a sharpening. This mid-cycle refresh for the 2019 model year brings revamped aesthetics, few minor changes to the interior, and a slew of active safety equipment. In fact, Ford is claiming the 2019 Edge comes with more standard driver assist features than any of its competition.

So what makes the Edge so technologically adept? Well, the standard safety features list is long. It includes Forward Collision Warning and Dynamic Brake Support; Pre-Collision Assist with Pedestrian Detection; Blind Spot Information with Cross-Traffic Alert; Lane-Keeping Alert; Lane-keeping Assist; Auto High Beams; and Hill-Start Assist. Basically, the 2019 Edge comes with all the latest (almost autonomous) driver aids without having to order an expensive option package. Here’s how the 2019 Ford Edge shapes up.

Continue reading for more on the 2019 Ford Edge.


Exterior

  • Restyled front fascia
  • Restyled rear fascia
  • LED headlights come standard
  • Available LED fog and accent lighting
  • Redesigned rear LED taillights
  • Four new wheel options
  • Four new color choices

2019 Ford Edge - image 762316
“Up front, the 2019 Edge gets a new, more upright grille, reshaped headlights, larger fog light openings, a restyled chin, and a new hood”

The pun about Ford sharpening the Edge for 2019 actually holds truth. The new model has a more angular design with crisper lines and harder edges. Like most mid-cycle refreshes, the majority of changes happen to the front and back.

Up front, the 2019 Edge gets a new, more upright grille, reshaped headlights, larger fog light openings, a restyled chin, and a new hood. The changes are subtle but help lend a more modern appeal to the crossover. The headlights are now also LED high and low beams as standard. The optional fog lights and accent lighting are LED, as well.

That same level of updates happen out back, too. The biggest change is the license plate relief; it’s larger now with the handle for the power-lift tailgate positioned closer to the bumper. It seems to give the Edge a taller, statelier appearance. The taillights are another big change. They move from having small internal details to larger, bolder sections behind the reshaped clear lens. Like before, they are LED.


2019 Ford Edge - image 762312
“The lower apron is restyled with a more pronounced (yet still fake) skid plate and dual exhaust tips”

The rear bumper didn’t escape the designers’ touch. The lower apron is restyled with a more pronounced (yet still fake) skid plate and dual exhaust tips. The bumper’s sides now have a faux exhaust vent cut vertically into the quarter panel. Beyond the modified bodywork, four new wheels and four new color choices span the options list.

Interior

  • Updated center console
  • New rotary shift knob
  • New wireless phone charger
  • Updated SYNC 3 with FordPass
  • New Ford+Alexa app

2019 Ford Edge - image 762333
“Ford didn’t reinvent the Edge’s interior for 2019 but certainly gave it a few welcomed updates”

Ford didn’t reinvent the Edge’s interior for 2019 but certainly gave it a few welcomed updates. In fact, all the changes take place in the center console. The shift lever has been replaced with a rotary shift knob similar to the 2018 Ford Expedition. As such, the knob frees up extra space in the console, allowing for vertically mounted cup holders along the right side and a coin tray along the bottom. Buttons for the automatic start/stop system and parking aids are located below the shifter, along with the electronic parking brake.

Inside the hidden storage compartment under the HVAC controls lies a wireless phone charger and two USB ports. The new physical smartphone integration goes along with the new FordPass system. It is Ford’s Wi-Fi hotspot with bandwidth for 10 devices. FordPass also allows the owner to access the vehicle via their smartphone. Services include operating door locks, locating the vehicle, and even starting it up.

Ford’s SYNC 3 infotainment system now comes with Amazon Alexa integration. Called Ford+Alexa, the software works like a standard Alexa personal assistant, letting users voice-control various things like calendar entries, navigation controls, smart home features, and several in-vehicle things like radio settings and media content. This all takes place within the standard 8.0-inch touchscreen display.


2019 Ford Edge - image 762334
“The shift lever has been replaced with a rotary shift knob similar to the 2018 Ford Expedition”

Speaking of the radio, the 2019 Edge offers an optional 12-speaker B&O PLAY sound system from Harman. SiriusXM and HD Radio are integrated as standard.

The 2019 Ford Edge continues with the same passenger and cargo space as before. The rear cargo space offers 39.2 cubic feet of room, but with the 60/40-split second row folded flat, the room expands to 73.4 cubic feet. Legroom is generous, too, with front occupants getting 42.6 inches and rear passengers getting 40.6 inches. Headroom is also respectable with both rows getting no less than 40.2 inches.

Drivetrain

  • Updated 2.0-liter EcoBoost adds five horsepower
  • 250 horsepower & 275 pound-feet of torque
  • New eight-speed automatic transmission
  • FWD standard; AWD optional
  • 3.5-liter V-6 no longer offered

2019 Ford Edge - image 762317
“Ford has also made some significant changes behind the 2019 Edge’s new grille”

Ford has also made some significant changes behind the 2019 Edge’s new grille. Gone is the 3.5-liter V-6 option. The sole powerplant is the carry-over 2.0-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder, well, save for the new Edge ST’s 2.7-liter EcoBoost making 355 horsepower.

But for those not getting the sporty Edge ST, the 2.0-liter EcoBoost should prove just fine. Ford updated the engine with five more horsepower over last year, bringing the total to 250, while torque remains unchanged at 275 pound-feet. Ford also promises the new 2.0-liter will be more fuel efficient than before.

Much of the efficiency improvements likely come from the Edge’s new eight-speed automatic transmission that replaces last year’s six-speed auto. The new gearbox should help the Edge realize a few more ticks on the highway fuel economy rating. A new automatic start/stop system is also added. The outdoing 2018 Edge with the 2.0-liter and FWD is EPA-estimated at 20 mpg city, 29 mpg highway, and 24 mpg combined. Count on the 2019 Edge breaking the 30 mpg highway barrier.

As before, AWD is optional.

Safety Technology

  • Every 2019 Edge comes standard with active safety tech
  • New Evasive Steering Assist actively steers away from danger

2019 Ford Edge - image 762319
“A big selling point for the 2019 Edge is the long list of standard safety features at no extra charge”

A big selling point for the 2019 Edge is the long list of standard safety features at no extra charge. On the active front, the Edge includes Forward Collision Warning and Dynamic Brake Support; Pre-Collision Assist with Pedestrian Detection; Blind Spot Information with Cross-Traffic Alert; Lane-Keeping Alert; Lane-Keeping Assist; Auto High Beams; and Hill-Start Assist.

Optional active safety equipment includes a few newcomers to the Edge’s toolbox includes Post-Collision Braking, Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop-And-Go and Lane Centering. There is also something called Evasive Steering Assist. It works by helping the driver steering around stopped or slower moving vehicles by adding steering input if the driver doesn’t quite provide enough action.

On the passive side, the Edge comes with the typical stuff like traction control, roll stability control, Ford’s Curve Control, and a 911 Assist feature. Dual front airbags, side-impact airbags, and side curtain airbags are also in the mix.

Pricing


2019 Ford Edge - image 762320

Ford has not released pricing for the 2019 Edge at the time of this writing, but we expect that information sometime before the Edge reaches dealerships in the summer of 2018.

The current 2018 Ford Edge carries a starting price of $23,850 for the base S trim. The more middle-America SE trim starts at $25,605 while the mid-range SLE starts at $28,005. The range-topping Titanium trim starts at $32,045. We expect these prices to have a $200 to $500 increase on each trim level.

The Competition

Hyundai Santa Fe Sport


2017 Hyundai Santa Fe - image 665174

The Santa Fe Sport is like the Santa Fe, only without the third row and without any real sport. Get past the name and this of this as the Tahoe version of Chevy’s Suburban. Like the Ford Edge, the Santa Fe Sport is only a two-row crossover yet its larger size technically makes it a mid-size crossover. The same is true for the Nissan Murano below.
That the Hyundai offers is a great deal, a solid warranty, and an all-around great package for the price. Its exterior is decently handsome and its interior is well equipped (especially in upper trims).

The Santa Fe Sport does offer several active safety features, but you’ll pay to get them. Things like blind spot detection, rear cross-traffic alert, lane change assist, a 360-degree camera system, adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning, automatic emergency braking, automatic high beams, and adaptive low beams are all optional features. Count on Hyundai changing this in the years to come.

The 2018 Santa Fe Sport comes standard with a 2.4-liter four-cylinder making only 185 horsepower. Standard on all but the base trim is the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder making a more respectable 240 horsepower and 250 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission is the sole gearbox, but customers can choose between FWD and AWD. Fuel economy for the 2.0T in FWD is EPA-estimated at 20 mpg city, 28 mpg highway, and 23 mpg combined. Adding AWD drops the numbers to 19/26/22 respectively.

Prices for the 2018 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport start at $22,200 for the 2.4-liter version. Hop up to the 2.0T in the base trim, and the price jumps to $28,350. The Sport 2.0T Ultimate trim starts at $32,650.

Read our full review on the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport.

Nissan Murano


2016 Nissan Murano – Driven - image 687622

The Murano has been around since 2015, but Nissan has added several active safety features for 2018. Standard features include Automatic Emergency Braking and Forward Collision Warning on every trim, Blind Spot Warning and Rear Cross Traffic Alert standard on SV trims, and adaptive cruise control as standard on the SL and Platinum trims. A new center console is said to be more user-friendly and the NissanConnect infotainment system with its 8.0-inch screen offers navigation, Apple CarPlay, and Android Auto.

Power comes from a single engine – the ole 3.5-liter V-6. It makes 260 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque and continues to pair with a Continuously Variable Transmission. AWD can be had for $1,600 on any trim level. Fuel economy is EPA-estimated at 21 mpg city, 28 mpg highway, and 24 mpg combined. Impressively, AWD does not affect fuel economy.

Pricing for the 2018 Nissan Murano starts at $30,550. The mid-grade SV trim starts at $33,850 and the SL trim at $38,250. The decked-out Platinum trim carries a base price of $41,980 but includes just about every bell and whistle as standard.

Read our full review on the 2017 Nissan Murano..

Conclusion


2019 Ford Edge - image 757857

The 2019 Ford Edge might not be completely new, but Ford has done a great job at revitalizing one of its key vehicles. The Edge competes in an extremely competitive segment these days, so Ford has to offer its A-game in order to succeed. With so many active safety features as standard – plus new exterior styling, a new tech-rich center console, and upgraded 2.0-liter turbo-four – it seems Ford knows what customers are looking for.

We look forward to getting behind the wheel and experiencing these updates first-hand. Once that happens, we’ll bring you the in-depth coverage you’ve come to expect here at TopSpeed.com. In the meantime, check out our coverage on the 2019 Ford Edge ST below.

  • Leave it
    • * No more V-6 option
    • * Price increase

References

Ford Edge


Ford Edge ST Takes Detroit by Storm - image 759179

Ford Edge ST Takes Detroit by Storm


2019 Ford Edge ST - image 757605

Read our full review on the 2019 Ford Edge ST.

Ford Edge


2015 Ford Edge - image 557596

Read our full review on the 2017 Ford Edge.


maker logos - image 744958

Read more Ford news.


maker logos - image 753286

Read more Detroit Auto Show news.

PostHeaderIcon Ford Edge

The Ford Edge has been around since 2007 and its current generation debuted in 2015. But the second-generation Edge was getting a little, well, dull, so Ford has given the mid-size crossover a sharpening. This mid-cycle refresh for the 2019 model year brings revamped aesthetics, few minor changes to the interior, and a slew of active safety equipment. In fact, Ford is claiming the 2019 Edge comes with more standard driver assist features than any of its competition.

So what makes the Edge so technologically adept? Well, the standard safety features list is long. It includes Forward Collision Warning and Dynamic Brake Support; Pre-Collision Assist with Pedestrian Detection; Blind Spot Information with Cross-Traffic Alert; Lane-Keeping Alert; Lane-keeping Assist; Auto High Beams; and Hill-Start Assist. Basically, the 2019 Edge comes with all the latest (almost autonomous) driver aids without having to order an expensive option package. Here’s how the 2019 Ford Edge shapes up.

Continue reading for more on the 2019 Ford Edge.


Exterior

  • Restyled front fascia
  • Restyled rear fascia
  • LED headlights come standard
  • Available LED fog and accent lighting
  • Redesigned rear LED taillights
  • Four new wheel options
  • Four new color choices

2019 Ford Edge - image 762316
“Up front, the 2019 Edge gets a new, more upright grille, reshaped headlights, larger fog light openings, a restyled chin, and a new hood”

The pun about Ford sharpening the Edge for 2019 actually holds truth. The new model has a more angular design with crisper lines and harder edges. Like most mid-cycle refreshes, the majority of changes happen to the front and back.

Up front, the 2019 Edge gets a new, more upright grille, reshaped headlights, larger fog light openings, a restyled chin, and a new hood. The changes are subtle but help lend a more modern appeal to the crossover. The headlights are now also LED high and low beams as standard. The optional fog lights and accent lighting are LED, as well.

That same level of updates happen out back, too. The biggest change is the license plate relief; it’s larger now with the handle for the power-lift tailgate positioned closer to the bumper. It seems to give the Edge a taller, statelier appearance. The taillights are another big change. They move from having small internal details to larger, bolder sections behind the reshaped clear lens. Like before, they are LED.


2019 Ford Edge - image 762312
“The lower apron is restyled with a more pronounced (yet still fake) skid plate and dual exhaust tips”

The rear bumper didn’t escape the designers’ touch. The lower apron is restyled with a more pronounced (yet still fake) skid plate and dual exhaust tips. The bumper’s sides now have a faux exhaust vent cut vertically into the quarter panel. Beyond the modified bodywork, four new wheels and four new color choices span the options list.

Interior

  • Updated center console
  • New rotary shift knob
  • New wireless phone charger
  • Updated SYNC 3 with FordPass
  • New Ford+Alexa app

2019 Ford Edge - image 762333
“Ford didn’t reinvent the Edge’s interior for 2019 but certainly gave it a few welcomed updates”

Ford didn’t reinvent the Edge’s interior for 2019 but certainly gave it a few welcomed updates. In fact, all the changes take place in the center console. The shift lever has been replaced with a rotary shift knob similar to the 2018 Ford Expedition. As such, the knob frees up extra space in the console, allowing for vertically mounted cup holders along the right side and a coin tray along the bottom. Buttons for the automatic start/stop system and parking aids are located below the shifter, along with the electronic parking brake.

Inside the hidden storage compartment under the HVAC controls lies a wireless phone charger and two USB ports. The new physical smartphone integration goes along with the new FordPass system. It is Ford’s Wi-Fi hotspot with bandwidth for 10 devices. FordPass also allows the owner to access the vehicle via their smartphone. Services include operating door locks, locating the vehicle, and even starting it up.

Ford’s SYNC 3 infotainment system now comes with Amazon Alexa integration. Called Ford+Alexa, the software works like a standard Alexa personal assistant, letting users voice-control various things like calendar entries, navigation controls, smart home features, and several in-vehicle things like radio settings and media content. This all takes place within the standard 8.0-inch touchscreen display.


2019 Ford Edge - image 762334
“The shift lever has been replaced with a rotary shift knob similar to the 2018 Ford Expedition”

Speaking of the radio, the 2019 Edge offers an optional 12-speaker B&O PLAY sound system from Harman. SiriusXM and HD Radio are integrated as standard.

The 2019 Ford Edge continues with the same passenger and cargo space as before. The rear cargo space offers 39.2 cubic feet of room, but with the 60/40-split second row folded flat, the room expands to 73.4 cubic feet. Legroom is generous, too, with front occupants getting 42.6 inches and rear passengers getting 40.6 inches. Headroom is also respectable with both rows getting no less than 40.2 inches.

Drivetrain

  • Updated 2.0-liter EcoBoost adds five horsepower
  • 250 horsepower & 275 pound-feet of torque
  • New eight-speed automatic transmission
  • FWD standard; AWD optional
  • 3.5-liter V-6 no longer offered

2019 Ford Edge - image 762317
“Ford has also made some significant changes behind the 2019 Edge’s new grille”

Ford has also made some significant changes behind the 2019 Edge’s new grille. Gone is the 3.5-liter V-6 option. The sole powerplant is the carry-over 2.0-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder, well, save for the new Edge ST’s 2.7-liter EcoBoost making 355 horsepower.

But for those not getting the sporty Edge ST, the 2.0-liter EcoBoost should prove just fine. Ford updated the engine with five more horsepower over last year, bringing the total to 250, while torque remains unchanged at 275 pound-feet. Ford also promises the new 2.0-liter will be more fuel efficient than before.

Much of the efficiency improvements likely come from the Edge’s new eight-speed automatic transmission that replaces last year’s six-speed auto. The new gearbox should help the Edge realize a few more ticks on the highway fuel economy rating. A new automatic start/stop system is also added. The outdoing 2018 Edge with the 2.0-liter and FWD is EPA-estimated at 20 mpg city, 29 mpg highway, and 24 mpg combined. Count on the 2019 Edge breaking the 30 mpg highway barrier.

As before, AWD is optional.

Safety Technology

  • Every 2019 Edge comes standard with active safety tech
  • New Evasive Steering Assist actively steers away from danger

2019 Ford Edge - image 762319
“A big selling point for the 2019 Edge is the long list of standard safety features at no extra charge”

A big selling point for the 2019 Edge is the long list of standard safety features at no extra charge. On the active front, the Edge includes Forward Collision Warning and Dynamic Brake Support; Pre-Collision Assist with Pedestrian Detection; Blind Spot Information with Cross-Traffic Alert; Lane-Keeping Alert; Lane-Keeping Assist; Auto High Beams; and Hill-Start Assist.

Optional active safety equipment includes a few newcomers to the Edge’s toolbox includes Post-Collision Braking, Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop-And-Go and Lane Centering. There is also something called Evasive Steering Assist. It works by helping the driver steering around stopped or slower moving vehicles by adding steering input if the driver doesn’t quite provide enough action.

On the passive side, the Edge comes with the typical stuff like traction control, roll stability control, Ford’s Curve Control, and a 911 Assist feature. Dual front airbags, side-impact airbags, and side curtain airbags are also in the mix.

Pricing


2019 Ford Edge - image 762320

Ford has not released pricing for the 2019 Edge at the time of this writing, but we expect that information sometime before the Edge reaches dealerships in the summer of 2018.

The current 2018 Ford Edge carries a starting price of $23,850 for the base S trim. The more middle-America SE trim starts at $25,605 while the mid-range SLE starts at $28,005. The range-topping Titanium trim starts at $32,045. We expect these prices to have a $200 to $500 increase on each trim level.

The Competition

Hyundai Santa Fe Sport


2017 Hyundai Santa Fe - image 665174

The Santa Fe Sport is like the Santa Fe, only without the third row and without any real sport. Get past the name and this of this as the Tahoe version of Chevy’s Suburban. Like the Ford Edge, the Santa Fe Sport is only a two-row crossover yet its larger size technically makes it a mid-size crossover. The same is true for the Nissan Murano below.
That the Hyundai offers is a great deal, a solid warranty, and an all-around great package for the price. Its exterior is decently handsome and its interior is well equipped (especially in upper trims).

The Santa Fe Sport does offer several active safety features, but you’ll pay to get them. Things like blind spot detection, rear cross-traffic alert, lane change assist, a 360-degree camera system, adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning, automatic emergency braking, automatic high beams, and adaptive low beams are all optional features. Count on Hyundai changing this in the years to come.

The 2018 Santa Fe Sport comes standard with a 2.4-liter four-cylinder making only 185 horsepower. Standard on all but the base trim is the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder making a more respectable 240 horsepower and 250 pound-feet of torque. A six-speed automatic transmission is the sole gearbox, but customers can choose between FWD and AWD. Fuel economy for the 2.0T in FWD is EPA-estimated at 20 mpg city, 28 mpg highway, and 23 mpg combined. Adding AWD drops the numbers to 19/26/22 respectively.

Prices for the 2018 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport start at $22,200 for the 2.4-liter version. Hop up to the 2.0T in the base trim, and the price jumps to $28,350. The Sport 2.0T Ultimate trim starts at $32,650.

Read our full review on the 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport.

Nissan Murano


2016 Nissan Murano – Driven - image 687622

The Murano has been around since 2015, but Nissan has added several active safety features for 2018. Standard features include Automatic Emergency Braking and Forward Collision Warning on every trim, Blind Spot Warning and Rear Cross Traffic Alert standard on SV trims, and adaptive cruise control as standard on the SL and Platinum trims. A new center console is said to be more user-friendly and the NissanConnect infotainment system with its 8.0-inch screen offers navigation, Apple CarPlay, and Android Auto.

Power comes from a single engine – the ole 3.5-liter V-6. It makes 260 horsepower and 240 pound-feet of torque and continues to pair with a Continuously Variable Transmission. AWD can be had for $1,600 on any trim level. Fuel economy is EPA-estimated at 21 mpg city, 28 mpg highway, and 24 mpg combined. Impressively, AWD does not affect fuel economy.

Pricing for the 2018 Nissan Murano starts at $30,550. The mid-grade SV trim starts at $33,850 and the SL trim at $38,250. The decked-out Platinum trim carries a base price of $41,980 but includes just about every bell and whistle as standard.

Read our full review on the 2017 Nissan Murano..

Conclusion


2019 Ford Edge - image 757857

The 2019 Ford Edge might not be completely new, but Ford has done a great job at revitalizing one of its key vehicles. The Edge competes in an extremely competitive segment these days, so Ford has to offer its A-game in order to succeed. With so many active safety features as standard – plus new exterior styling, a new tech-rich center console, and upgraded 2.0-liter turbo-four – it seems Ford knows what customers are looking for.

We look forward to getting behind the wheel and experiencing these updates first-hand. Once that happens, we’ll bring you the in-depth coverage you’ve come to expect here at TopSpeed.com. In the meantime, check out our coverage on the 2019 Ford Edge ST below.

  • Leave it
    • * No more V-6 option
    • * Price increase

References

Ford Edge


Ford Edge ST Takes Detroit by Storm - image 759179

Ford Edge ST Takes Detroit by Storm


2019 Ford Edge ST - image 757605

Read our full review on the 2019 Ford Edge ST.

Ford Edge


2015 Ford Edge - image 557596

Read our full review on the 2017 Ford Edge.


maker logos - image 744958

Read more Ford news.


maker logos - image 753286

Read more Detroit Auto Show news.

PostHeaderIcon Subaru WRX STI – Driven

Those television commercials say Subarus are made from love. That’s only the case if we’re talking about the love of motorsports and rally racing. See, generations of Subarus, most notably the Impreza WRX and WRX STI models, have taken home World Rally Championship trophies from events around the world. Thankfully, Subaru injects this racing pedigree into the production version of its WRX models, making them some of the best performing, all-weather and terrain racing machines on the planet. And now for 2018, the WRX and WRX STI receive a slight cosmetic refresh paired with a handful of mechanical upgrades.

I recently spent a few days with a 2018 WRX STI Limited painted in that lovely WR Blue Pearl hue. At first glance, the acid-green brake calipers and tall rear wing command the eye’s attention. But looking deeper, you’ll see the front grille is ever so slightly more aggressive than before. A new set of 19-inch, Y-spoke wheels are new, as are those bright brake calipers and the larger rotors they squeeze. Things inside change little, too, through the small changes make big improvements in comfort. A larger information screen atop the dash has new graphics, the StarLink Infotainment system now measures 7.0 inches, the rear seat gets a folding center armrest with cup holders, the door panels have new grab handles, and road noise is hushed thanks to thicker side glass and added insulation. Mechanically, Subaru gave the STI a new fully electronic center differential that’s said to work faster than the previous mechanical and electrical DCCD. Sadly, Subaru chose not to completely rework the WRX STI onto the Impreza’s new-for-2017 chassis. Even the 2.5-liter Boxer engine remains untouched at 305 horsepower and 290 pound-feet of torque. But does this dull the rally-inspired driving experience. Hardly. Keep reading to find out more.

Continue reading for the full review.

PostHeaderIcon Subaru WRX STI – Driven

Those television commercials say Subarus are made from love. That’s only the case if we’re talking about the love of motorsports and rally racing. See, generations of Subarus, most notably the Impreza WRX and WRX STI models, have taken home World Rally Championship trophies from events around the world. Thankfully, Subaru injects this racing pedigree into the production version of its WRX models, making them some of the best performing, all-weather and terrain racing machines on the planet. And now for 2018, the WRX and WRX STI receive a slight cosmetic refresh paired with a handful of mechanical upgrades.

I recently spent a few days with a 2018 WRX STI Limited painted in that lovely WR Blue Pearl hue. At first glance, the acid-green brake calipers and tall rear wing command the eye’s attention. But looking deeper, you’ll see the front grille is ever so slightly more aggressive than before. A new set of 19-inch, Y-spoke wheels are new, as are those bright brake calipers and the larger rotors they squeeze. Things inside change little, too, through the small changes make big improvements in comfort. A larger information screen atop the dash has new graphics, the StarLink Infotainment system now measures 7.0 inches, the rear seat gets a folding center armrest with cup holders, the door panels have new grab handles, and road noise is hushed thanks to thicker side glass and added insulation. Mechanically, Subaru gave the STI a new fully electronic center differential that’s said to work faster than the previous mechanical and electrical DCCD. Sadly, Subaru chose not to completely rework the WRX STI onto the Impreza’s new-for-2017 chassis. Even the 2.5-liter Boxer engine remains untouched at 305 horsepower and 290 pound-feet of torque. But does this dull the rally-inspired driving experience. Hardly. Keep reading to find out more.

Continue reading for the full review.

PostHeaderIcon 2018 GMC Yukon Denali Gets a New Grille and Two Extra Cogs

The popular GMC Yukon and Yukon XL Denali are getting a few welcomed updates for 2018. General Motors’ new Hydra-Matic 10-speed automatic transmission makes its first appearance in a GM SUV, first appearing in the 2017 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1. Denoting the model-year changes are a new Denali “cheese grater” chrome grille and a new, real-wood interior trim called Mastique Ash. As before, the Denali comes standard with GM’s powerful 6.2-liter V-8 derived from the Corvette Stingray’s LT1 small-block V-8.

The remainder of the Yukon Denali remains unchanged. That’s not completely terrible, as the Yukon still feels fresh, having debuted for the 2015 model year. The new transmission features a wider, 7.39 overall gear ratio that offers a shorter first gear of 4.70:1 and taller 10th gear of 0.64:1. Combined, the result is better acceleration off the line and improved fuel economy at highway speeds over the outgoing eight-speed automatic’s 4.56 and 0.65 respective ratios. Helping the 420-horsepower V-8 keep cool are larger openings in the new Denali grille. As before, active grille shutters ahead of the radiator close when extra cooling airflow isn’t needed in order to improve aerodynamics for fuel efficiency.

Continue reading for more information.


TiresDirect
SuperTune Kit:
Auto Auctions:
1955 Chevrolet Other Pickups 1955 Chevrolet Truck * V8 * Resto Mod * 4 Speed * No Reserve
$9,500.00 (10 Bids)
End Date: Tuesday Mar-26-2019 18:59:39 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

2011 Ford Mustang GT500 Texas Direct Auto 2011 GT500 Used 5.4L V8 32V Manual RWD Coupe Premium
$25,001.00 (25 Bids)
End Date: Saturday Mar-23-2019 11:09:16 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $38,380.00
Buy It Now | Bid now | Add to watch list

1955 Chevrolet Other Pickups 1955 Chevy 3100 Big Back Window
$5,200.00
End Date: Friday Mar-29-2019 16:39:47 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $5,200.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

1955 Chevrolet Other Pickups 1955 chevy truck
$8,600.00 (3 Bids)
End Date: Thursday Mar-28-2019 13:07:41 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1964 Chevrolet C-10 base Ca. desert truck solid with very little rust
$5,500.00
End Date: Thursday Mar-28-2019 9:44:17 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $5,500.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

1970 Ford Mustang 2 Dr 1970 Mustang Fastback 302 V8 4bbl Automatic Folddown Seat Solid Driver withTitle
$8,609.00 (27 Bids)
End Date: Thursday Mar-28-2019 20:04:50 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1948 Chevrolet Other Pickups 1948 Chevy pickup
$1,650.00
End Date: Wednesday Mar-27-2019 11:23:09 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $1,650.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

1965 Ford Mustang 1965 Ford Shelby Cobra Mustang GT350 Fastback Rotisserie Concourse Restoration
$500,000.00
End Date: Sunday Mar-31-2019 20:00:00 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $500,000.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

1983 Chevrolet Other Pickups Rust Free Original Paint Survivor 2wd C20 350 Auto. Pristine AutoCheck Report!
$3,800.00
End Date: Sunday Mar-24-2019 20:45:00 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $3,800.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

1994 Chevrolet Other Pickups S10 1994 Chevrolet S10 street rod pickup
$1,525.00 (11 Bids)
End Date: Thursday Mar-28-2019 11:31:59 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1970 Ford Mustang Convertible 1970 Ford Mustang Convertible
$8,100.00 (19 Bids)
End Date: Sunday Mar-31-2019 12:32:43 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1966 Ford Mustang Coupe Base 1966 Mustang In-line 6 Coupe 60k miles
$1,800.00 (0 Bids)
End Date: Monday Mar-25-2019 19:44:43 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1969 Ford Mustang coupe 1969 ford mustang
$6,700.00
End Date: Wednesday Mar-27-2019 19:00:04 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $6,700.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1 1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1
$15,000.00 (28 Bids)
End Date: Sunday Mar-24-2019 17:00:00 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1954 Chevrolet Other Pickups NO RESERVE, REAL PATINA! BAGGED, AIR RIDE, 3100,F100,MODEL A, BELAIR, 150, 210,
$14,100.00 (27 Bids)
End Date: Sunday Mar-24-2019 18:00:28 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

2006 Ford Mustang GT Premium 2006 Ford Mustang GT Premium 20,481 Miles Torch Red Clearcoat 2D Coupe 4.6L V8 2
$5,000.00 (13 Bids)
End Date: Tuesday Mar-26-2019 14:11:34 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1984 Chevrolet Other Pickups 1984 Chevrolet Chevette
$1,875.00 (5 Bids)
End Date: Friday Mar-29-2019 10:44:59 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1948 Chevrolet Other Pickups 2 Dr Base 1948 CHEVY 5W LS5.3 PICKUP
$13,000.00 (19 Bids)
End Date: Monday Mar-25-2019 18:10:34 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $14,500.00
Buy It Now | Bid now | Add to watch list

1970 Ford Mustang Mach 1 1970 Mustang MACH 1 Restored White 351C FMX A/C Marti report Runs Great SHARP!
$18,600.00 (3 Bids)
End Date: Monday Apr-1-2019 18:58:38 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $37,000.00
Buy It Now | Bid now | Add to watch list

1950 Chevrolet Other Pickups 1950 chevrolet truck complete 48 49 50 51 52 chevy
$3,500.00
End Date: Saturday Mar-23-2019 10:16:17 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $3,500.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

1969 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible 1969 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible with Big Block 427/390, Numbers Match
$20,300.00 (20 Bids)
End Date: Friday Mar-29-2019 12:11:07 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1966 Ford Mustang Fastback 1966 Ford Mustang K-code Fastback
$25,100.00 (58 Bids)
End Date: Wednesday Mar-27-2019 10:46:01 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1966 Ford Mustang C-CODE 1966 FORD MUSTANG C-CODE 84,229 Miles Yellow 289 Automatic
$16,500.00
End Date: Monday Apr-1-2019 9:22:22 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $16,500.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

1987 Chevrolet Other Pickups 1987 Chevy C/K 1500
$25,000.00
End Date: Thursday Mar-28-2019 8:35:20 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $25,000.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

1965 Ford Mustang Coupe 289 Restomod project car with LOTS of trick parts
$6,700.00 (26 Bids)
End Date: Saturday Mar-23-2019 17:17:44 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1965 Chevrolet C-10 1965 Chevy C-10 Custom Restored Original Wood In Bed
$23,000.00
End Date: Thursday Mar-28-2019 21:12:08 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $23,000.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

1968 Chevrolet C-10 Custom 1968 chevy C10
$7,500.00 (0 Bids)
End Date: Monday Apr-1-2019 13:51:40 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

2017 Ford F-150 Raptor Texas Direct Auto 2017 Raptor Used Turbo 3.5L V6 24V Automatic 4WD Pickup Truck
$12,150.00 (26 Bids)
End Date: Friday Mar-29-2019 10:02:33 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $57,980.00
Buy It Now | Bid now | Add to watch list

1971 Chevrolet C-10 1971 Chevy shordbed slick black truck
$5,500.00 (34 Bids)
End Date: Thursday Mar-28-2019 19:54:49 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list

1961 Chevrolet Other Pickups Apache 1961 Chevrolet Apache C20
$2,840.00 (0 Bids)
End Date: Wednesday Mar-27-2019 16:40:15 PDT
Bid now | Add to watch list