Archive for the ‘Porsche 911’ Category

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 992 by Techart

There’s a rule of thought that a lot of tuners abide. You don’t work on a tuning program for a Porsche 911 unless you know what you’re doing. There are a handful of tuners out there that are regarded as being some of the best Porsche tuners in the business. TechArt is one of them. The German tuner has built and developed programs for a lot of Porsche models. It has an impeccable reputation, earned from years of building some of the best kits you can buy for your beloved Porsches. It just so happens that TechArt has a new program to offer, one for the all-new, 992-generation Porsche 911. In keeping with its stature, TechArt’s new kit is loaded in all departments. From exterior changes to engine upgrades, the German tuner covered all its bases, and the result is a tuning program that owners of the new 911 992 should seriously consider getting. Don’t take it from us; check out the program and see for yourselves.

PostHeaderIcon Bet You Never Thought You’d See a Porsche 911 GT3 That’s Powered By a Motorcycle Engine

The Porsche 911 has been the subject of many engine swaps over the years. In fact, the Neunelfer has seen its fair share of LS engines being dropped under its tail, but nobody ever thought of fitting a motorcycle engine inside the 911. Or, if they thought about it, they didn’t get to do it. Mind you, the 911 you’re about to see is not a real 911. We mean, it’s real, but it started out life as a toy. Yet somehow, someone crammed a KTM dirt bike motor under its hood and we can’t stop drooling.

PostHeaderIcon There’s Lots of Porsche Goodness in the “Bad Boys for Life” Trailer, and Martin Lawrence Has Spent a Lot of Time in The Kitchen

It’s hard to believe that it’s been 16 years since we last saw Will Smith and Martin Lawrence in a Bad Boys movie, but that’s exactly how long it’s been. Mercifully, the long wait for the “threequel” is about to end now that the trailer for the third movie in the franchise, Bad Boys For Life, has finally dropped.

It’s a typical Bad Boys film in that there’s plenty of action, explosives, dry humor, and Smith and Lawrence busting on each other. Oh, and there’s a 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S in the movie, too. It’s a nice callback to the original Bad Boys movie from 1995, though I suspect some people aren’t old enough to remember that movie. Bad Boys isn’t the Fast & Furious, but for those who are old enough to remember Will Smith and Martin Lawrence’s first movie together, you’ll know that Bad Boys had its fair share of drop-dead gorgeous vehicles. It’s nice to know that almost 25 years since that first movie hit the theaters, that formula hasn’t changed, even if Lawrence’s physique has.

PostHeaderIcon Say Hello to the 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 and Carrera 4 Cabriolet

It’s hard to focus on anything else than Frankfurt’s highly-anticipated debuts this year, including the likes of Porsche Taycan and Volkswagen ID. Speaking of Porsche, the carmaker has just unveiled the all-wheel-drive 911 Carrera 4 and Carrera 4 Cabriolet, so those who’ve been holding out on getting a new 911 because AWD wasn’t on the table might as well start calling their accountants.

PostHeaderIcon Here’s Everything We Know About The 2020 Porsche 911 Turbo Convertible

Back when Porsche introduced the 911 Cabriolet in 1983, proper sports car enthusiasts recognized one thing – the 911 was not only for the driving enthusiasts – it is also for drivers that see it as a status symbol. Now, almost four decades later, we get the 911 992 Cabrio in Carrera and Carrera 4S forms. Yet, fast roofless monsters still thunder over the Nurburgring and enjoy the sun on city streets across Europe. These are Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolets – possibly the best cabriolets that world has ever seen. While I am expecting a 911 Turbo Cabrio reveal at the 2020 Geneva Motor Show, this is what I’ve gathered about it.

PostHeaderIcon $375,000 Could Get You This Porsche 911 Carrera Safari

We don’t know about you, but we have a thing for old Porches. For some weird reason, our hearts skip a beat whenever one of these gracious sports cars comes in sight. Hell, we’ve been spending enough hours as it is playing Need For Speed – just to get a fill, albeit digital, of what’s it like to hone a classic Porsche through a scenery meant to recreate the Côte d’Azur. That’s the same reason we would be willing to sell a lung and a kidney just to get our hands on this 1984 911 Carrera 3.2 that’s been turned into a sort of safari car. Yes, safari car. Read on.

PostHeaderIcon Someone Caught the 2020 Porsche 911 Turbo and 2020 Porsche Taycan on Camera

The 2020 Porsche 911 Turbo is expected to come later this year, but we don’t have to wait to see it. The car has been spotted doing test runs out in the open sans any clothes. The car looks super sexy in black, driving sedately behind a cement mixer. In another instance, even the Porsche Taycan was spotted from the rear roaming the streets. We get to see the huge ass taillights and turn signal in action as well. Another prototype of the Porsche Taycan was spotted sprinting with blue dressing with ‘soul electrified’ and ‘Taycan’ decals on it. Although these sightings are fun, it makes the wait seem even longer. Can we just have the cars already, Porsche?!

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 GT3 – A Complete History

Porsche is known for continuously bringing race-bred technology into its road cars. The Stuttgart-based manufacturer that has been perfecting the rear-engine formula for over five decades now is also famous for its homologation specials, road-worthy counterparts built by Porsche to race thoroughbred competition machinery in production-based classes of sports car racing. 20 years ago, Porsche introduced the latest model that would spawn a myriad of racing versions: the Porsche 911 GT3, a track-oriented 911 that could be used as a daily driver (if you dared). It came at the same time as the not-for-the-purist 996 generation but, in spite of this, can you now imagine a world without the 911 GT3 in it?

Where were you in 1999 when Porsche unveiled the 996.1-generation Porsche 911 GT3? Well, you probably weren’t at the Geneva Auto Show where Porsche took the wraps of what was, in essence, the road-legal version of the newest Porsche 911 Cup car that would compete in the Porsche Carrera Cup Germany and later in the Porsche Supercup sharing the bill with the Formula 1 World Championship. The first 911 GT3 looked a bit tame but, as years rolled by, it evolved, growing bigger, more aggressive, and more insane and overshadowed with ease the 911 GT2, a model we originally thought it’d replace before Porsche decided to continue making GT2 models, somewhat as even more extreme versions of the 911. This is the story of the GT3, a model more famous than all of the track-focused 911s that have come before it, even the Carrera RS 2.7 of 1973.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 GT3 – A Complete History

Porsche is known for continuously bringing race-bred technology into its road cars. The Stuttgart-based manufacturer that has been perfecting the rear-engine formula for over five decades now is also famous for its homologation specials, road-worthy counterparts built by Porsche to race thoroughbred competition machinery in production-based classes of sports car racing. 20 years ago, Porsche introduced the latest model that would spawn a myriad of racing versions: the Porsche 911 GT3, a track-oriented 911 that could be used as a daily driver (if you dared). It came at the same time as the not-for-the-purist 996 generation but, in spite of this, can you now imagine a world without the 911 GT3 in it?

Where were you in 1999 when Porsche unveiled the 996.1-generation Porsche 911 GT3? Well, you probably weren’t at the Geneva Auto Show where Porsche took the wraps of what was, in essence, the road-legal version of the newest Porsche 911 Cup car that would compete in the Porsche Carrera Cup Germany and later in the Porsche Supercup sharing the bill with the Formula 1 World Championship. The first 911 GT3 looked a bit tame but, as years rolled by, it evolved, growing bigger, more aggressive, and more insane and overshadowed with ease the 911 GT2, a model we originally thought it’d replace before Porsche decided to continue making GT2 models, somewhat as even more extreme versions of the 911. This is the story of the GT3, a model more famous than all of the track-focused 911s that have come before it, even the Carrera RS 2.7 of 1973.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 GT3 – A Complete History

Porsche is known for continuously bringing race-bred technology into its road cars. The Stuttgart-based manufacturer that has been perfecting the rear-engine formula for over five decades now is also famous for its homologation specials, road-worthy counterparts built by Porsche to race thoroughbred competition machinery in production-based classes of sports car racing. 20 years ago, Porsche introduced the latest model that would spawn a myriad of racing versions: the Porsche 911 GT3, a track-oriented 911 that could be used as a daily driver (if you dared). It came at the same time as the not-for-the-purist 996 generation but, in spite of this, can you now imagine a world without the 911 GT3 in it?

Where were you in 1999 when Porsche unveiled the 996.1-generation Porsche 911 GT3? Well, you probably weren’t at the Geneva Auto Show where Porsche took the wraps of what was, in essence, the road-legal version of the newest Porsche 911 Cup car that would compete in the Porsche Carrera Cup Germany and later in the Porsche Supercup sharing the bill with the Formula 1 World Championship. The first 911 GT3 looked a bit tame but, as years rolled by, it evolved, growing bigger, more aggressive, and more insane and overshadowed with ease the 911 GT2, a model we originally thought it’d replace before Porsche decided to continue making GT2 models, somewhat as even more extreme versions of the 911. This is the story of the GT3, a model more famous than all of the track-focused 911s that have come before it, even the Carrera RS 2.7 of 1973.

PostHeaderIcon Will These Renderings of a Modern Porsche 911 GT1 Really Come to Life?

What happens when you take a current-generation Porsche 911, splash on a bit of the 911 RSR’s performance nuttiness, and infuse a little design inspiration from a 20-year old race car that won 47 endurance races in its career? The result is this series of renderings created by designer Emre Husmen. It’s called the Porsche 911 GT1 Concept, and while it technically doesn’t exist, these renderings are proof that maybe it should. Porsche has the final say on that matter, but seeing as the automaker has yet to field an entry for the upcoming FIA WEC season — new regulations require Porsche to build road-going versions of racers competing in the series — perhaps it should start drawing up those plans so that the road-going model can happen, too. If the latter looks anything close to Husmen’s rendering, the road-spec version of Porsche’s next WEC racer has “intriguing” written all over it.

PostHeaderIcon How Much Does the 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera Cost and Is it Worth it?

Porsche is finally facing heat from the competition and has decided to act towards it. No, it’s not some fancy, high-end model this time. In fact, Porsche is making its base strong and is looking to increase volumes with this model. The company from Stuttgart has introduced new ‘base trims’ for the 911 Carrera and the Cabriolet. These models are detuned versions of the current 911 Carrera S and 4S, and cost a lot less than them. Did Porsche come up with this idea because of the 2020 Corvette C8 hype?

PostHeaderIcon Fearing the Future? Don’t – Porsche Has Plans to keep its Naturally Aspirated Engines and Manual Gearboxes Beyond the EV Onslaught

Last year Porsche sold between 3,000 and 4,000 GT cars. These machines, developed and produced by Po…

PostHeaderIcon Herbie ’The Love Bug’ Returns To Race In The 2019 24 Hours of Spa-Francorcamps

The annual 24 Hours of Spa-Francorchamps is, arguably, the world’s biggest professional endurance race for GT cars and, this year, the entry list reached a new high: 72 cars are set to take the start on July the 27th. Or that’s what we thought before a strange-looking Bug appeared out of a pit box during the official Spa Test Days.

Racing to raise awareness about a certain disease or in order to collect money for a charity is a noble thing but, up until now, we’ve seen no project go as far as this. The brainchild of Pascal Witmeur, long-time Belgian racing driver, this project aims to both celebrate the 50th anniversary of the original Herbie motion picture (’The Love Bug’, released in cinemas in the U.S. in March of 1969) and to gather funds for the VivaCité (RTBF) ’Viva for Life’ project and ’Kinderarmoedefonds.be’ charities. The car was created with the help of Belgian luxury car dealer Deman Brussels and is, at its core, a Porsche 911 (991) Cup MR – the Manthey Racing-modified version of Porsche’s 911 Cup car.

PostHeaderIcon The 2019 Porsche 911 RSR Says “Screw Your Turbo” – There’s No Replacement for Displacement

.split806785

The Porsche 911 RSR, the company’s iconic race car for FIA endurance duty, was redesigned for 2019 and introduced at the 2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed. Improved in all key areas, the new 911 RSR replaces the previous RSR that scored more than 20 class wins in the FIA World Endurance Championship and other long-distance series in North America and Europe.

PostHeaderIcon The 2019 Porsche 911 RSR Says “Screw Your Turbo” – There’s No Replacement for Displacement

.split806785

The Porsche 911 RSR, the company’s iconic race car for FIA endurance duty, was redesigned for 2019 and introduced at the 2019 Goodwood Festival of Speed. Improved in all key areas, the new 911 RSR replaces the previous RSR that scored more than 20 class wins in the FIA World Endurance Championship and other long-distance series in North America and Europe.

PostHeaderIcon Relieve Some Stress With This Porsche 911 GT3 Track Therapy Video!

If life’s doldrums are kicking into high gear, I have something that should calm your sensibilities long enough for you to shed at least a little stress. That “something” is an 11-minute video on YouTube featuring nothing but the Porsche 911 GT3casually going about its business on a race track. I say “casually” because the GT3 looks like it’s going through the motions on the race track. But there’s nothing casual about the sound of that naturally aspirated Porsche flat-six filling our ears. It’s relaxing, chilling, and therapeutic, converging all at once to fill our minds with the kind of chill that should get us through the week. Dial up the volume, folks. This 11-minute video is your go-to video of the day.

PostHeaderIcon A $50,000 Windshield Isn’t the Only Outrageously Expensive Part on this One-Off Porsche 911 (993) Speedster

The Porsche 911 (993) is one of the most sought-after Porsche 911 models in history. Its place in history is secure as the last 911 generation to feature an air-cooled engine. It’s considered the grail among grails, the kind of car that routinely sells for around $200,000. Now imagine a scenario where the grail among grails gets even rarer. Should we call it the grail among the grails among grails? That’d be too confusing so let’s just call it by its actual name: the Porsche 911 (993) Speedster.

The 993 Speedster is so rare that Porsche actually built just two units of the model, one for Ferdinand Alexander Porsche for his 60th birthday in 1995 and another for TV comedian Jerry Seinfeld. In other words, you have a better shot at finding Narnia than spotting an actual 993 Speedster on the road. But, just because these two models are a sight unseen, that doesn’t mean that we can’t see proper replicas that carry the exclusive essence of the 993 Speedster in the proudest way imaginable.

That’s the case with John Sarkisyan, who many of you know is an ace in the classic car restoration and modification scene. Sarkisyan is the man responsible for the Steampunk Porsche 911 and the Mercedes 300SL Gullwing, both of which were created on the bones of different models. Sarkisyan’s latest project is this stunning Porsche 993 Speedster, which started its life as a 993 Convertible. This is proper aftermarket tuning done to the absolute peak of its powers. It’s no wonder that, in recreating the 993 Speedster, Sarkisyan ponied up a significant amount of money, including dropping $50,000 on the car’s windshield. Believe it or not, the $50,000 windshield isn’t the only outrageously expensive part of this recreated Porsche 993 Speedster. Then again, that’s the kind of price you have to pay if you want to build yourself a model where there are only two actual ones in existence.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 Wide Track Phantom Speedster by DP Motorsport

The Porsche 911 is a lot like wine. The older it is, the more desirable it becomes. That appeal has stretched bounds that we previously thought didn’t exist. No more is that clear than in the aftermarket tuning world, for example. There once was a time when the mere thought of modifying an original Porsche 911 was tantamount to automotive treason. But now? It’s not only become a big business, but it’s also evolved into a what-you-can-do-I-can-do-better competition among aftermarket companies. Take this 1989 Porsche 911 Targa 3.2, for example. Traditional convention suggests that this classic 911 Targa should be kept in stock condition, preserved in its OG state for all eternity. German tuner DP Motorsports had other plans. It’s not the Porsche 911 Targa 3.2 anymore. It’s the Porsche Phantom Speedster, and guess what, it looks spectacular.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 Targa

If you like the Targa top in your Corvette, you must know that Porsche did it first, in 1967. Now, the 992-generation of the ageless Porsche 911 continues the tradition and the latest Porsche 911 Targa will be introduced as a 2020 model year car and will feature the 444 horsepower 3.0-liter, twin-turbocharged flat-six seen on both the Carrera S and the Carrera 4S. Expect it to cost at least $135,000, some $22,000 more expensive than a Carrera S. Blame it on that roll hoop that’s drenched in history.

Once upon a time, there was a road race through Sicily’s narrow, winding roads that awarded those that proved to be unphased by angry locals, that sometimes drew guns on the competitors, and the perilous condition of the tarmac in many areas of the Circuito delle Madonie. That race was the Targa Florio, launched in 1907 by rich entrepreneur Vincenzo Florio, that became a sort of a favorite for Porsche and its drivers, the brand from Stuttgart winning the race 11 times in less than two decades. How is this relevant to a 2020 Porsche? Read on to find out.

TiresDirect
SuperTune Kit:
Auto Auctions: