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Archive for the ‘Porsche Carrera’ Category

PostHeaderIcon 10 Sports Cars with the Best MPG

Fuel efficiency may not be the prime concern when looking to purchase a sports car, but these days the two don’t have to be mutually exclusive. Long gone are the days when you had to sacrifice pretty much everything in order to drive a fun car that put a smile on your face – these days you can have your sporty cake and also eat it, and these are the cars you can do it in. All models below blend twisty road enjoyment with some manner of fuel-sipping tech on top of their improved practicality and day-to-day usability compared to equivalent models of decades past.decades past.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 Carrera RS

The Porsche 911 Carrera RS is an exercise in reducing a formula to its purest form. It was built as a lighter, faster, and more powerful version of the 964-generation Carrera 2 and it stands as a spiritual successor of the magnificent 911 Carrera 2.7 RS from the early ‘70s.

The Benjamin Dimson-penned Porsche 911 (964) debuted in 1989 and featured a rounder body shape in tune with the times which was a clear, but not profoundly radical, departure from the design of the previous 911 that was still tracing its roots back to the original Ferdinand Alexander Porsche-drawn model launched in 1963.

For 1992, Porsche launched the Carrera RS in Europe which was, in essence, a road-legal version of the Carrera Cup racing cars. This single-make series was on the bill of the Formula 1 World Championship weekends as support races in between F1 sessions.

The 911 Carrera RS never officially made it across the Atlantic and into the U.S. market. With that being said, 45 cars that were meant to be used in a Carrera Cup U.S. series that never materialized did trickle down to dealerships and were quietly sold in 1993 in the shadow of the RS America which deserves its own review as it isn’t identical to the European RS.

PostHeaderIcon The Porsche 911 T Goes on a Diet, Proves Porsche can Reshuffle its Deck

The phrase “less is more” applies to a lot of things in this world. It doesn’t, however, apply to the Porsche 911. In this case, “more is more” is a better way to describe the 911, and, for its part, Porsche is giving the people what they want with the arrival of the 911 Carrera T. The arrival of the 911 Carrera T comes at a time when Porsche is doing right by its loyal fan base by living up to its promise of introducing more “pure” iterations of the iconic sports car. The 911 R and the 911 GT3 are already around to tickle the purist’s fancy. Now it’s being joined by a new derivative that’s almost 50 pounds lighter than the standard 911. Happy days are ahead for Porsche 911 fans because the 911 Carrera T has arrived.


The Porsche 911 T Goes on a Diet, Proves Porsche can Reshuffle its Deck
- image 749048
“The Carrera T weighs just 3,142 pounds. That’s almost 50 pounds lighter than the standard 911 Carrera.”

Weight-savings is a big deal in the world of sports cars, and we see that on full display in how the Porsche 911 Carrera T is packaged. The model actually starts off as a standard Carrera unit, but in the name of cutting weight, the rear seats and the infotainment system are taken out. There is an option for these parts to be put back in, but that defeats the purpose of cutting weight, doesn’t it? In any case, the Carrera T weighs just 3,142 pounds. That’s almost 50 pounds lighter than the standard 911 Carrera.

Beyond the cut in weight, the 911 Carrera T also features a 3.0-liter biturbo flat-six engine that produces 370 horsepower and 332 pound-feet of torque, exactly the same amount of power that the base Carrera has. But since the Carrera T is a weight class lower than its standard counterpart, it’s capable of sprinting from 0 to 62 mph in just 4.5 seconds. That’s 0.1 seconds quicker than the standard model. The top speed for this new variant sits at 182 mph with the standard manual transmission and 180 mph with the optional PDK unit.

At the end of the day, any sports car’s value is largely dependent on its actual value. The Porsche 911 Carrera T does well for itself in that regard because it starts at $102,100. Sure, it’s $11,000 more than the standard 911 Carrera T, but with all of its improvements, I’d say it’s worth the extra $10K. Should you agree and you’re looking to get one, orders for the newest 911 derivate are already being taken. Sign up for one, and you can expect yours to be delivered sometime in the middle of 2018.

References

Porsche 911


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739972

Read our full review on the 2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T.


2017 Los Angeles Auto Show – Visitor's Guide - image 745566

Read more 2017 Los Angeles Auto Show news.

PostHeaderIcon Banned No More: Cars From The Class of 1992 That Can Now Be Registered In The U.S.

“25” may seem like a random number in the auto industry, but ask any self-respecting collector in America the significance of this number, and they’ll tell you all about it. For those who don’t know, “25” in this context means “25 years,” as in the number of years that need to pass before a car that was not originally produced in the U.S. and was not subjected to strict U.S. guidelines for crash tests can now be legally imported and registered for road use.

The rationale behind the NHTSA’s 25-year timetable has left many collectors confused and frustrated. The word “overkill” has even been used many times by a number of collectors we talked to. But that’s the rule; it is what it is.

The good news is that every year, a batch of these forbidden fruits become ripe for the picking by virtue of them finally meeting the 25-year criteria imposed by This year, car models from 1992 finally got their “welcome to America” status. Whether there’s still interest in any of them is a different story altogether. The important thing is that they can now be registered for road use here in the U.S., giving them the opportunity to finally touch thousands of miles of roads that were previously forbidden to them.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

Autozam AZ-1


Banned No More: Cars From The Class of 1992 That Can Now Be Registered In The U.S. - image 747301

Let’s start this list with a complete oddity. The Autozam AZ-1 is the rare car that manages to be cool and strange at the same time. It traces its roots to Mazda’s short-lived Autozam marquee, which specialised on building small cars, otherwise known as keicars in that market. In the five years that Autozam was around, it developed a full lineup of these cars, one of which was the AZ-1. It’s hard to tell what the AZ-1’s defining feature was because there’s enough of them to go around. It could be the gullwing doors. It could be its mid-engine layout. Heck, it could even be its flamboyant styling. Whatever it was, the AZ-1 was ahead of its time in a lot of different ways.

Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution


2003 Mitsubishi Lancer Evo VIII - image 46657

Technically, the Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution has already made its way into the U.S. market. But that didn’t happen until 2003 when the Evo VIII became available. Unfortunately, the first seven versions of the street-legal rally car remain unicorns in the American market, at least until this year when the first iteration of the Lancer Evolution turns 25 years old. It’s now legal to register the OG Evo in the U.S., and the next few years should also open the doors for succeeding versions of the all-wheel-drive hero ride when they hit their respective magic numbers.

Ford Escort RS Cosworth


Banned No More: Cars From The Class of 1992 That Can Now Be Registered In The U.S. - image 747300

The Ford Escort RS Bosworth sits in the same wheelhouse as the Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution in that both trace roots to the rally racing world. Like the Lancer Evo, the Escort RS Bosworth was homologated for road use in 1992. It even received a good number of Cosworth bits and pieces, including the iconic YBT engine that has developed a cult following of its own. That engine was capable of producing 227 horsepower and together with its top-flight handling and all-wheel drive capabilities, it was able to run on any kind of surface and speed up to around 137 mph. Having been built by Ford of Europe, the Cossie never made it to the U.S., at least until this year when all 1992 models received their 25-year entry cards.

Alfa Romeo RZ


Banned No More: Cars From The Class of 1992 That Can Now Be Registered In The U.S. - image 747302

Alfa Romeo has produced its share of memorable cars in its history, but very few captured the hearts and wallets of people like the RZ convertible. Designed in collaboration with Zagato, the RZ featured dramatic styling that emphasized the stylistic strengths of the Italian design house. It also came with a 3.0-liter V-6 engine that produced 210 horsepower, enough power to help make it a serious performer on the road. Combine that with the car’s race car-derived hydraulic suspension and those who are willing to spend time and money to bring the RZ to the U.S. could have a car that can grab serious attention.

BMW M5 Touring


Banned No More: Cars From The Class of 1992 That Can Now Be Registered In The U.S. - image 747303

The BMW M5 Touring is not the sexiest car in this list. It might not even be the most prominent of its body type (more on that later). But it makes its way here because it achieved unicorn status when its sedan counterpart made its way stateside in 1992. That model went on to do well here in the U.S., but those who preferred the wagon version we’re out of luck. That all changed when the calendar flipped to 2017. Sure, it’s 25 years too late for the M5 Touring, but it’s worth noting that the car’s classic look still makes it a desirable piece of vintage BMW. It also doesn’t hurt that it’s powered by a straight-six engine that produced 311 horsepower.

Subaru Impreza WRX


Banned No More: Cars From The Class of 1992 That Can Now Be Registered In The U.S. - image 747304

As awesome as it is to own a 1992 BMW M5 Touring, I’m not taking it over a same-year make of the Subaru Impreza. It was back in 1992 when the first versions of the Impreza came to life, and the performance-spec WRX variants quickly became sensations to every market they were sent to. Sadly, the U.S. was shut out from getting the OG Impreza WRX, depriving us of a car that featured a number of rally-inspired technology, including an all-wheel drive system, a stiffened suspension, and a turbocharged four-cylinder engine that came with 240 horsepower. 2017 is the first year that we can get our hands on the car that started the WRX legacy. Now that the opportunity is here, expect a lot of collectors to try to get their hands on one.

Maserati Ghibli


Banned No More: Cars From The Class of 1992 That Can Now Be Registered In The U.S. - image 747305

When Maserati introduced the third-generation Ghibli at the 2013 Shanghai Auto Show, it brought back a name that the Italian automaker hadn’t used since 1998. That was the last year of the second-generation Ghibli’s six-year production run, which began in 1992. The second-gen Ghibli will never upend the first-gen version in my mind, but if you’re looking for a four-door performance sedan from the early 1990’s to buy, few offer the kind of stories that the second-gen Ghibli has. Its persona non grata status in the U.S. for the past 25 years may be its defining trait, but it also came with some notable features, including a 2.0-liter V-6 engine that produced in excess of 300 horsepower and 275 pound-feet of torque. Thanks to a standard six-speed manual transmission, the second-gen Ghibli was capable of sprinting from 0 to 60 mph in 5.7 seconds on its way to posting a top speed of 156 mph.

Porsche 911 Carrera RS (964)


Banned No More: Cars From The Class of 1992 That Can Now Be Registered In The U.S. - image 747316

The Porsche 911 Carrera RS (964) is a good example of a car that should be bought and registered as soon as it became eligible for road use in the U.S. It’s not as iconic as its predecessor, but it’s still the real deal. Emissions and safety regulations prevented us from enjoying it when first came out, but now that it’s been unshackled, you can get one this year in all its glory, including its 3.6-liter flat-six engine that produced 256 horsepower. In the event that you’re looking for one, you need to be quick at it because the model is already making a good case for itself as a sought-after collectible among Porsche collectors. Just last year, a 1991 Carrera RS 964 sold for around $200,000, roughly the same price you’ll have to pay for a brand new Porsche 911 Turbo. Now go imagine what the 1992 model will fetch in the same setting.

Honda NSX-R


Banned No More: Cars From The Class of 1992 That Can Now Be Registered In The U.S. - image 747317

The last two cars on this list are without question the most desirable ones to get. First up is the Honda NSX Type-R, or NSX-R for short. You’ll get varying opinions about the original NSX-R, but those opinions most likely fall under the awesome and really awesome categories. Not only is the NSX-R regarded as the model that really brought to life Honda’s Type R brand, it also set a standard for performance cars that’s still held in high regard to this day. It doesn’t have mind-blowing power numbers — “only” 276 horses from a 3.0-liter VTEC V-6 engine — by today’s supercar standards, but everything else about the NSX-R is still impressive even by today’s standards. It was 256 pounds lighter than the standard NSX. It had a cabin that came with lightweight carbon-Kevlar seats. It had forged-aluminum Enkei wheels. It even had a stiffened chassis and suspension that made it potent on the track. The NSX-R’s legacy is cemented by its current status as a sought-after collectible among car collectors. It’s next to impossible to find one of these models today carrying anything less than a six-figure price tag.

Jaguar XJ220


1992 - 1994 Jaguar XJ 220 - image 677818

It’s only fitting that the holy grail of the “batch of 1992” is one of the first modern supercars to capture the world’s attention. The Jaguar XJ220 was, at one point, the fastest production car in the world. That record-setting achievement was largely due to a twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V-6 engine that produced 550 horsepower and 475 pound-feet of torque. With that kind of power, the XJ220 was able to sprint from 0 to 60 mph in just 3.6 seconds and reach a top speed of 212.3 mph. The supercar’s stranglehold on the “fastest production car” title even lasted for a few years until the McLaren F1 came along and beat it. That’s not a diss on the XJ220, but a compliment to how impressive of a supercar it really was. It took the McLaren F1, arguably the most important supercar of the modern automotive era, to usurp the XJ220 as the fastest production car in the world. To say that the Jaguar XJ220 is sought after in today’s collector’s scene is a gross understatement. It’s already reaching six-figure price tags on account of its status (only 275 were made) and history, and as the years go by, those prices will only go one direction: up, up, and away.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 Carrera T

2018 Porsche Carrera T

The Porsche 911 has gone through some big changes in the last couple of years, with the most important being Porsche’s decision to replace all naturally aspirated engines with turbocharged counterparts. While this was rather disappointing to some die-hard fans, it brought enhanced performance and fuel economy across the entire lineup. Porsche also revived the GT2 nameplate after a long absence and created the 911 R, essentially a limited-edition, wingless version of the GT3 for purists. Come 2017 and the German firm is offering yet another model aimed at purists and 911 Classic enthusiasts, but this time around is a significantly more affordable package. It’s called the 911 Carrera T and slots between the base Carrera and the GTS.

Inspired by the 911T, the company’s entry-level 911 between 1967 and 1973, the Carrera T is essentially a base Carrera with features taken off the more performance-oriented GTS. Fitted with a unique design elements inside and out, the Carrera T is also the first Carrera to get full bucket seats and rear-axle steering. The Carrera T is also lighter than the standard model, which makes it the lightest 911 available outside the GT3 and GT2 range. The added features and the lighter curb weight also makes it a tad quicker than the entry-level Carrera, placing it just below the Carrera S model in terms of performance. So while it’s not the least powerful and most affordable 911, as the 911T was back in the late 1960s, it’s a solid proposition for customers who want a no-nonsense Carrera but also desire access to the performance-enhancing features usually offered with the GTS model.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 Carrera T.

Official video

Exterior


- Optimized spoiler lip

- Agate Gray highlights

- Lightweight rear windscreen and side windows

- Lowered suspension

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739972
“Up front, the 911 T is identical to the entry-level Carrera save for the aerodynamically optimized spoiler lip”

A 911 Carrera at heart, the T model has a hard time standing out in a pack of base 911 sports cars. Up front, the 911 T is actually identical to the entry-level Carrera save for the aerodynamically optimized spoiler lip. And even though it may sound fancy, this feature is actually not so different design-wise, which makes it difficult to spot. But there is one way to tell that a T isn’t a regular 911 Carrera, even when looking at the front end: the SportDesign mirrors are finished in Agate Grey, whereas the standard Carrera has them painted in the same color as the body.

More hints that this is a different model can be found on the sides, starting with the 20-inch, Carrera S wheels in Titanium Grey with a stripe bearing the “T” designation. A black stripe just above the side skirt contains “911 Carrera T” lettering. Finally, the coupe sits nearly half an inch closer to the ground thanks to the standard PASM sport suspension, but this isn’t exactly noticeable.


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739958
“The rear windscreen and rear side windows are made of lightweight glass”

A few extra features can be spotted around back as well. The louvers of the decklid grille, the badge, and the “911 Carrera T” lettering are all finished in Agate Grey, while the sport exhaust system has black tips. The rear windscreen and rear side windows are made of lightweight glass. Granted, the latter doesn’t change the way this 911 looks, but makes quite a different in the power-to-weight department. But more on that in the “Drivetrain” section below.

Paint options for the 911 Carrera T are as varied as they get and include Lava Orange, Black, Guards Red, Racing Yellow, White and Miami Blue. Metallic colors like Carrera White, Jet Black, and GT Silver are optional. It’s pretty cool that Porsche is offering Lava Orange, a color first launched with the GT3 RS, for 911 Carrera model.

left
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Interior

  • Optional bucket seats with rear-seat delete
  • Lightweight door handles and insulation
  • Shorter gear lever
  • GT Sport leather steering wheel

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739964
“It's the first 911 Carrera available with the Full Bucket Seats package”

The interior of the 911 Carrera T is actually a bit more exciting than the exterior, combining a range of race-inspired features that you can’t get on the standard Carrera. The coupe comes equipped with Sport Seats Plus as standard. These four-way electrically adjustable seats are finished in black, have “911” logos embossed on the headrests, and center sections made of Sport-Tex. But the big news lies in the fact that you can order the Full Bucket Seats package, a first for the 911 Carrera designation. The option also comes with a rear-seat delete to save even more weight.

Speaking of weight-saving measures, the standard door handles have been replaced with fabric loops. The cool thing about these is that they also give the door panels a race-inspired look. Further weight is saved by use of thinner sound insulation under the skin. This is Similar to the 911 GTS and yes, it makes the cabin a bit louder. But hey, it’s a sacrifice you have to make if you want a quicker Carrera without the GTS premium.


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739959
“A shorter gear lever with embossed shift pattern in red is standard”

Porsche also added a GT Sport steering wheel with leather rim and a switch for driving mode selection, as well as a shorter gear lever with embossed shift pattern in red. The trim on the dashboard and doors is black, which isn’t particularly exciting, but the Carrera T Interior Package adds contrasting colors in Racing Yellow, Guards Red or GT Silver. The latter add colored accents to the seat belts, the “911” logo on the headrests, the door opener loops, and the Sport-Tex seat surfaces.

Drivetrain

  • Standard rear differential lock
  • 11 pounds lighter than base model
  • A tenth-second quicker to 60 mph
  • Optional rear-axle steering

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739977
“The Carrera T needs only 4.3 seconds to hit 60 mph a tenth-second quicker than the base Carrera”

The Carrera T draws its juice from the same 3.0-liter flat-six unit as the base 911 model. The turbocharged engine cranks out 370 and 332 pound-feet of torque, which is again identical to the entry-level model. Well, comparing specs on Porsche’s American website actually revealed there’s an extra pound-foot for the Carrera T, but that’s either a typo or it doesn’t make a difference in terms of performance. However, the standard manual transmission has a shorter constant transaxle ratio, while the mechanical rear differential lock is included at no extra cost.

What’s more, the Carrera T tips the scales at 3,142 pounds due to the weight-saving measures, which makes it 11 pounds lighter than the base Carrera and the lightest non GT 911 model available. Combined with the revised transmission, the PASM sport suspension, and the slightly lighter curb weight, the Carrera T needs only 4.3 seconds to hit 60 mph from a standing start, a tenth-second quicker than the base Carrera. Top speed is rated at an exciting 182 mph.


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739992
“Unlike the 911 Carrera, the T model can be equipped with the optional rear-axle steering”

When equipped with the optional PDK transmission, which also adds a launch control feature, the Carrera T completes the same benchmark in four seconds flat, which is not only quicker than a similarly equipped base Carrera, but also a tenth-second faster than the more powerful Carrera S with a manual transmission. Top speed for this model sits at 180 mph, a tad lower than the manual version.

Unlike the 911 Carrera, the T model can be equipped with the optional rear-axle steering, which is a cool thing to have on a non Turbo car.

Drivetrain Specifications

Engine 3.0-liter flat-six
Horsepower 370 HP @ 6,500 RPM
Torque 332 LB-FT
0 to 60 mph 4.3 seconds
Top Speed 182 mph
Weight 3,142 LBS

Prices


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739994

Pricing for the 911 Carrera T, which went on sale for the 2018 model year but won’t hit dealers until March, starts from $102,100, excluding the $1,050 delivery, processing and handling fee. That’s a $11,000 premium over the base 911 Carrera, which is reasonable given all the extra features. The T is also only $3,000 less than the Carrera S, which might be a problem if you like all that extra power. But hey, you’re getting a lot of GTS-specific stuff for nearly $19,000 less.

Porsche 911 Carrera T Manual $102,100
Porsche 911 Carrera T PDK $105,830

Competition

Mercedes-AMG GT


2018 Mercedes-AMG GT C Coupe - image 700634

Although it’s an entirely different animal as far as drivetrain layout goes, with the engine being mounted in front of the cabin, the AMG GT was developed as a competitor for the Porsche 911. While modern to look at, the coupe also has a vintage vibe to it reminding of the Mercedes-Benz grand tourers of the 1960s. So it’s actually very similar to the 911 from this standpoint. The interior is of the same variety, blending race-inspired features with luxurious amenities, fine materials, and a wide range of options. Under the hood, the German two-door hides a twin-turbo, 4.0-liter V-8. Upgraded for the 2018 model year, the base AMG GT comes with 469 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque, which is significantly more than the 911 Carrera T. With almost 100 extra horses at its disposal, you’d be tempted to think that the AMG GT is significantly quicker, but the difference is far from overwhelming. The sprint to 60 mph takes 3.9 seconds, which is only a tenth-second faster than the Carrera T with the PDK. Of course, we’re talking about four tenths if compared to the manual variant, but you need to consider that the Merc is some $10K more expensive at $112,400.

Read our full story on the 2018 Mercedes-AMG GT.

Jaguar F-Type


2017 Jaguar F-Type - image 655250

Although not exactly a full-fledged competitor for the 911, the F-Type has what it takes to give Porsche’s finest a run for its money. The exterior design, credited to have helped revive the brand, is aggressive and downright gorgeous, while the interior is packed with premium features and state-of-the-art tech. Sure, it doesn’t have rear seats, but given that the Carrera T can be had with a rear-seat delete, I think it’s a pretty fair comparison. Much like the 911, the F-Type can be had with a wide selection of drivetrains. In the U.S., the range begins with a 2.0-liter four-pot that cranks out 296 horsepower. That’s obviously not enough for the Carrera, especially since this model is significantly slower from 0 to 60 mph at 5.4 seconds. To get something closer, you have to go with the coupe fitted with the 3.0-liter V-6 rated at 400 horses and AWD. This one needs 4.9 seconds. Sure, it’s still slow, but the F-Type that’s next in line uses a massive 5.0-liter V-8. This one cranks out 550 horses and gets to 60 mph in 3.9 seconds. The good news is that this model retails from $99,900, which makes it a bit more affordable than the 911 Carrera T.

Read our full review of the 2017 Jaguar F-Type.

Alpine A110


2017 Renault Alpine A110 - image 708518

Much like the F-Type, the A110 plays in a different league. Alpine did aim at Porsche with this car, but the smaller 718 Cayman. The reason why I’m including it here it’s because the A110 is a proper, no-nonsense sports car created specifically for the purist in you. Not only does it pay tribute to one of the greatest European sports car ever built, it also combined classic heritage with carbon-fiber, premium features, and a lightweight construction that puts a Porsche to shame. Tipping the scales at an incredible 2,381 pounds, the A110 is some 800 pounds lighter than the 911 Carrera T. Power is provided by a turbocharged, 1.8-liter four-cylinder rated at 252 horsepower and 236 pound-feet of twist. This may not seem like a lot compared to the 911 Carrera, but the solid power-to-weight ratio enables the A110 to hit 60 mph in 4.5 seconds. That’s still slower than the Porsche, but not by much. The good news is that the Alpine is significantly more affordable at under €60,000 (around $70,400 as of October 2017) in Europe, but the bad news is that it’s not available in the United States and there’s no word as to when it will cross the pond.

Read our full story on the 2017 Alpine A110.

Conclusion


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739967

Diversification is key to success nowadays and it’s probably why I’m not surprised that Porsche rolled out yet another version of the 911. However, I’m not really sure that the Carrera T was a necessary addition to the lineup. Sure, having a base Carrera with some GTS features is a cool idea that should appeal many enthusiasts in need of a purist sports car, but I have strong doubts that the Carrera T will be a high seller. Linking this coupe to the 1968 911T is also a nice thing to do, but it’s not exactly very similar to its ancestor. While the 911T was the entry-level 911, the new Carrera T slots between the base model and the GTS and costs almost as much as the Carrera S. But I guess these details don’t make much of a difference since the 911T isn’t among the most iconic versions of the 911.

  • Leave it
    • Almost as expensive as the Carrera S
    • Do we actually need the Carrera T?

Porsche 911T History


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 740173
“The 911T is known for having helpted Porsche become the first German manufacturer to comply with strict U.S. exhaust and emission control regulations”

Introduced in 1967, there years after Porsche had launched the iconic nameplate, the 911T was the most affordable version of the 911. The concept wasn’t exactly new. When production of the 356 came to an end in 1965, Porsche noticed that there was still a market for a four-cylinder car, especially in the United States, so the German firm created the 912, a 911 with less equipment and the 356’s 90-horsepower engine. The 912 was kept into production until 1967, when it was replaced by the 911T, which slotted under the 911L and later the 911E.

Unlike the 912, the 911T used a flat-six engine. The first version was sold with the base 2.0-liter rated at 110 horsepower, but a 1969 upgrade replaced it with a 2.2-liter mill that generated 123 horses, 30 horsepower less than the 911E and 57 less than the 911S. The engine was again upgraded for all models, including the 911T, to a 2.4-liter unit in 1971. But unlike the 911E and 911S, which used mechanical fuel injection, the 911T was carbureted. However, this wasn’t the case in the United States, where regulations forced Porsche to also add fuel injection to the T model. The output was rated 130 horsepower in Europe, while the fuel-injection U.S. model came with 140 horses on tap. In January, 1973, North American 911T engines were switched to Porsche’s then-new K-Jetronic Continuous Fuel Injection system from Bosch. These CIS-powered cars are were among the last 911Ts built and are usually referred to as 1973.5 models by enthusiasts.


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739960

While not as iconic as other versions of the classic 911, the 911T is known for having helpted Porsche become the first German manufacturer to comply with strict U.S. exhaust and emission control regulations. The 911T is somewhat widely available in the U.S. right and if often considered a great starting point for collectors that want a first-generation Porsche 911. Prices vary depending on mileage and condition from as low as $40,000 to more than $120,000.

References

Porsche 911


2017 Porsche 911 - image 701926

Read our full review on the 2017 Porsche 911.


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739165

Read more Porsche news.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction

We’ve heard the story before, and for some reason, the idea keeps coming around. So what is it that I’m talking about? Well, I’m talking about car subscription services. And, the latest to jump into the ranks is Porsche with a new program that will let you pay a monthly fee for access to cars like the Porsche 718 Boxer, Cayman S, Macan S and the Cayenne. The monthly fee? Oh, just $2,000. For that $2,000 you get access to a total of eight different cars. If you want more, you can level up from the “launch” package to the “accelerate” package for an extra $1,000 – bringing the monthly total to $3,000. With that subscription, you’ll get access to models like Macan GTS, Cayenne S E-Hybrid, Panamera 4S, and the Carrera S. Basically, “Launch” gives you the basic, entry-level models while “Accelerate” gives you access to the higher trim levels.

Now, the first thought that really comes to mind is that the price seems quite high, and that wouldn’t necessarily be a wrong thought, but it does include at least some incentives. First off, the subscription includes vehicle tax and registration, insurance, maintenance, and detailing. It’s all based on a mobile phone app, and there is a one-time activation fee of $500 as well. Plus, you’ll have to pass a credit and background check too. Once users receive their first vehicle same day or future vehicle exchanges can be requested via the app. For now, the program is available to those residing in the metro Atlanta area and is made available through a collaboration between Clutch Technologies LLC and Porsche Passport. So, how does this subscription service stack up against purchasing your own Porsche? Well, let’s take a look.

You Might be Overpaying


Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction - image 738045
“For that $2,000 you get access to a total of eight different cars”

Now, the nice thing about this subscription is that you don’t have to pay for insurance, registration, plates, or even cleaning and maintenance. However, that $2,000 package gets you a base level model, so let’s take a look at the base, 911 Carrera. Priced at an entry-level price of $91,100, you might think you’ll be paying a ton, right? Well, with the standard $9,215 down, you can get a 36-month lease, with 15,000 miles per year for 3 years for roughly $1,152 a month – that’s $848 less than that “launch” package above. Will insurance and maintenance allow you to keep your total monthly expense below $2,000? I don’t know, I’ve never insured a Porsche, but I’m sure it varies by location as it does for any other vehicle. If you decide to purchase a base 911, you’re looking at $1,499 with the same down payment, which would put you a little closer to that $2,000 per month bracket with insurance. But, with that in mind, you can also do with the car as you wish, so it may be a fair tradeoff.


Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction - image 738046
“This model will set you back a minimum of $112,000 on the sticker, but with $11,305 down, you can lease one for $1,555 a month or purchase one for $1,840 a month”

Now, let’s talk about the Carrera 4S – one of the same models you get in the $3,000 package and the best Carrera (outside of the cabriolet with the same badge) that you can get. This model will set you back a minimum of $112,000 on the sticker, but with $11,305 down, you can lease one for $1,555 a month or purchase one for $1,840 a month – both significantly cheaper than the $3,000 a month subscription fee even if you cover insurance and maintenance yourself.

Of course, I won’t forget that the program also includes detailing, which can set you back every month or so, if you don’t take care of your own vehicle. And, you can swap out your car for any other of the Porsche lineup (if you have the “Accelerate” package, anyway) so maybe the pricing isn’t all that bad. But, if you’re interested in driving a certain model on a regular, it will most certainly be cheaper to actually buy or lease the car than to opt for this kind of subscription.


Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction - image 738047
“If you’re interested in driving a certain model on a regular, it will most certainly be cheaper to actually buy or lease the car than to opt for this kind of subscription.”

Now, the question is… What do you think? If you had pockets deep to shell out $2,000 or $3,000 per month, would you do it? Let us know what’s on your mind in the comments section below.

References

Porsche 718


2017 Porsche 718 Cayman - image 697886

Read our full review on the 2017 Porsche 718 Cayman.


2017 Porsche 718 Boxster - image 723935

Read our full review on the 2017 Porsche 718 Boxster.

Porsche 911


2017 Porsche 911 - image 644852

Read our full review on the 2017 Porsche 911.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 991.2 Carrera GTS Targa

The 991-generation Porsche 911 was launched in 2011 as a replacement for the 997-gen model, which was produced between 2004 and 2012. Unveiled at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show, it features an entirely new platform, only the third since the original 911 came to be in 1963. It’s also the first all-new 911 platform since 1999. Major changes compared to the previous version include a longer wheelbase, a new transaxle, and lighter aluminum and composite materials. As always, the exterior design remained evolutionary, borrowing cues from previous generations. The Targa variant returned in January 2014 and by the end of 2015, Porsche launched several models, including the track-oriented GTS.

With the entire 911 lineup set to receive its mid-cycle facelift by the end of 2016, the German brand is preparing to launch the 991.2-gen GTS Targa. The updated sports car was recently tested on the Nurburgring track and our paparazzi were at the right place at the right time to take a few snaps. Fortunately, there’s not an inch of camouflage obscuring the test car, so we can have a close look at the upcoming GTS Targa.

Much like other 991.2-gen models, visual modifications are far from dramatic. However, more significant changes are expected to occur under the hood, including a switch to forced induction and notably more output. Find out more about that in our speculative review.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 991.2 Carrera GTS Targa.


PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 Carrera S by McChip

The current Porsche 911 received its first official facelift in 2015 when the 991.2 was unveiled at the 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show. The 991.2 received a handful of updates, the most notable of which was Porsche’s decision to drop the naturally aspirated engines in favor of a turbocharged version that came with modified compressor wheels, a specific exhaust system, and a revised engine management system. Needless to say, the updated 911 immediately became the apple of the eye of aftermarket companies.

One tuner that has taken a particular interest in the updated 911 Carrera S is McChip, the same tuning company that has developed programs for BMW, Audi, and Porsche sports cars. The obvious popularity of the new 911 made it a no-brainer for McChip to develop this kit, which puts on enough power to compete against similarly tuned versions of the BMW M4.

Granted, it’s not the most powerful upgrade in the market for the 911 Carrera S, but it still packs enough punch to be taken seriously. Plus, it’s cheap as heck, and ultimately, that’s the kind of thing that can trump whatever perceived misgivings customers may have for the program.

Continue after the jump to read the full review.


PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 Carrera S by McChip

The current Porsche 911 received its first official facelift in 2015 when the 991.2 was unveiled at the 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show. The 991.2 received a handful of updates, the most notable of which was Porsche’s decision to drop the naturally aspirated engines in favor of a turbocharged version that came with modified compressor wheels, a specific exhaust system, and a revised engine management system. Needless to say, the updated 911 immediately became the apple of the eye of aftermarket companies.

One tuner that has taken a particular interest in the updated 911 Carrera S is McChip, the same tuning company that has developed programs for BMW, Audi, and Porsche sports cars. The obvious popularity of the new 911 made it a no-brainer for McChip to develop this kit, which puts on enough power to compete against similarly tuned versions of the BMW M4.

Granted, it’s not the most powerful upgrade in the market for the 911 Carrera S, but it still packs enough punch to be taken seriously. Plus, it’s cheap as heck, and ultimately, that’s the kind of thing that can trump whatever perceived misgivings customers may have for the program.

Continue after the jump to read the full review.


PostHeaderIcon Carfection Takes The Turbocharged Porsche 911 Carrera S Out For A Spin: Video

A lot has been said about the Porsche 911 Carrera S packing a pair of turbochargers. Purists have scoffed at it in large part because they’ve remained loyal to the naturally aspirated engines. But even if the 911 Carrera S did buck against tradition, does that automatically make it an inferior car compared to its predecessors?

Carfection host Alex Goy sought to answer that question by taking the 911 Carrera S out for a spin. Granted, his time behind the wheel of the turbocharged Carrera – still feels weird typing that – didn’t come in the best of conditions as the slippery roads prevented him from really pushing it to its limit. But despite not having the most ideal test drive in history, Goy still managed to infuse the episode with some nuanced points that reflect the advantages of a turbocharged Carrera and the perceptions surrounding its new 3.0-liter turbo flat-six engine.

The drive turned out to be as pleasant as it could’ve been, at least under those slippery conditions. So while it’s understandable for old-school thinkers to brush off the 911 Carrera S as a product of Porsche adhering to the natural evolution of the industry, it’s unfair to sell the car short because of tradition.


PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 IROC RSR

In October 1973, twelve of the top drivers in the world were invited to compete in IROC, the International Race of Champions, an event penned by the legendary Roger Penske. The drivers were selected from the four major racing series at the time, Formula One, NASCAR, SCCA, and USAC, and included names such as Mark Donohue, George Follmer, A.J. Foyt, Richard Petty, and Bobby Unser. All were to drive the same car, as the goal of the event was to reduce variables such as the vehicle and its modifications and to put emphasis on the skill and race strategies for the drivers. Penske’s vehicle of choice was the Porsche 911 RSR.

Based on the RS 3.0 road car, the RSR had a wide body that allowed for Fuchs wheels shod in fat tires and a large, fiberglass whaletail instead of the ducktail seen on the stock models. The 3.0-liter engine was tweaked to deliver 315 horsepower instead of 231, but the standard five-speed transmission was preferred to the close-ratio units used on the racing versions. Only 15 were built and unleashed in a series of four races held at Riverside Raceway and Daytona Speedway in 1973 and 1974. The championship was won by Mark Donohue, who scored a $54,000 prize, the equivalent of nearly $300,000 today.

Most IROC-spec Porsches were sold following their service in the IROC series, including this bright yellow example that has spent its recent years in Jerry Seinfeld’s collection. A fervent collector of Porsche-badged vehicles, the actor has decided to part with this rare IROC racer, which will be auctioned at the Amelia Island Auction by Gooding & Company on March 11th, 2016.

The race car once driven by Peter Revson and George Follmer is part of a lot that also includes a 1955 550 Spyder and a 1958 356A GS/GT Carrera Speedster, also owned by Seinfeld. The RSR is estimated to fetch in excess of $1 million, but we’ll be back with the actual figure as soon as the hammer drops.

Note: All images copyright and courtesy of Gooding & Company

Continue reading to learn more about the 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 IROC RSR.


PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 Carrera S by Porsche Tequipment

For 20 years now, Porsche’s Tequipment program has earned its keep as the official go-to retrofitter of pre-owned Porsche models. This program has been doing this since 1995, and to commemorate this anniversary, Tequipment is partaking in a project to restore a used 2011 Porsche Carrera S back to look brand-spankin’ new, complete with some of the new digs and accessories being offered by the program.

The restoration of the Carrera S actually goes beyond showcasing the Tequipment brand. It’s also meant to highlight the breadth of the accessories program and its capacity to handle any retrofitting task for all Porsche models. In this particular instance, the 2011 Carrera S was completely overhauled to make it more modern and up-to-date.

In a lot of ways, Tequipment’s true strength lies in its ability to take an older Porsche model and overhaul its exterior, interior, and engine so that it doesn’t get left behind by the steady advancements in automotive technology. Whether it’s adding carbon fiber on the body or dressing up the steering wheel in Alcantara, Porsche Tequipment is brimming with new components that can be added into the car.

Porsche Equipment is an available program in any Porsche center all over the world.

To date, there are 86 of these centers in Germany alone and 811 all over the world. So wherever you are in this planet of ours, as long as there’s a Porsche center near you, the Tequipment program is also close by, as it has been for the past 20 years.

Continue reading for the full story.


PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Rennsport Reunion Edition

Porsche unveiled the first GTS version of the 911 Carrera in 2010. That’s might not be long enough to consider the 911 GTS a classic, but the GTS moniker is an important part of the brand’s heritage, as it harkens back to the 904 GTS race car of the mid-1960s. Designed to bridge the gap between the 911 Carrera and the track-ready GT3, the 911 GTS quickly made a name for itself as a purist’s car by ways of a more powerful, naturally aspirated flat-six and various special features inside and out.

Discontinued in 2010, after only two years on the market, the GTS didn’t return when Porsche launched the 991-generation 911. Its comeback took place in 2014, when it received a 430-horsepower engine and a racier look. However, the arrival of the 991.2 facelift, which replaced the Carrera’s all-motors with a turbocharged units, made the GTS’ future rather uncertain. No longer available on the company’s North American website, the GTS will either go turbo or disappear altogether.

But while Porsche has yet to say what fate awaits the GTS, it did launch a special-edition model for the 2015 Rennsport Reunion V. Meet the GTS Rennsport Reunion Edition, probably the last naturally aspirated GTS sold in the U.S.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Rennsport Reunion Edition.


PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 Convertible

Just ahead of its debut at the 2015 Frankfurt International Auto Show, Porsche has dropped details on the latest mid-cycle refresh for the drop-top 911, and it comes with a few new exterior styling tweaks, the latest infotainment and driver’s aides, and most notably, a smaller, turbocharged engine.

It appears as though Porsche is moving to widen the appeal of the 911 Convertible, which makes sense given the automaker’s lineup of hardcore, track-oriented models. However, purists will still inevitably complain about the boosted cabriolet’s engine, despite it bringing more power and greater efficiency.

The car is even quicker, with performance figures seeing improvements across the board and new standard features that enhance its race-inspired capabilities even further.

Porsche says the car blends “performance and everyday usability,” a combination the brand is well established for delivering.

Updated 09/28/2015: We’ve added a series of new photos we took at the 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show. Find them in the “Pictures” tab.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2016 Porsche 991 Carrera Convertible.


PostHeaderIcon James May's 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Will Be Put At Auction

A car having had a celebrity owner is a pretty dubious way for the value to be inflated. But when that owner is one of the most famous automotive journalists in the world, it might be worth taking another look. This 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera is currently owned by none other than James May, a man who was, until very recently, a presenter on BBC’s Top Gear. As such, it’s a pretty good bet that it has been well taken care of, and any doubts about whether May really owns it can be assuaged by the fact that he has driven the car on TV.

This isn’t just any 911 either; this is the final incarnation of the original 911 before it was replaced in 1989 by the Type 964, the Carrera 3.2. As May points out in the press release, it is a supremely ’80s car, wearing Guards Red paint and the giant “whale tail” spoiler for which ’80s 911s are justly famous. The stereo currently has a CD player installed, but if you want it, May has a cassette player that he’ll throw in so that you can get a more complete ’80s experience.

Continue reading for the full story.


PostHeaderIcon Steve McQueen's 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera Will Be Auctioned In Monterey

Before he passed away in 1980, Steve McQueen ordered the above-pictured 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera, and now, the car will be auctioned off at the Mecum Auctions during the upcoming Monterey Car Week in August. The car features a slew of special custom touches as executed by the legendary actor/racer/all-around badass McQueen, and is expected to cross the block for well over a million dollars. 

As anyone familiar with McQueen will tell you, no vehicle in the man’s extensive collection of machinery could be seen as “run-of-the-mill,” and such is the case with this 930 Turbo. The exterior is painted in a special-order Slate Gray, while the engine is an early production, non-intercooled 3.0-liter unit, making for what’s considered to be one of the more rare and pure iterations available. Grip is assisted thanks to positraction in the rear. 

Also included is a sunroof and dual side mirrors, while the interior is draped in black and is equipped with sport seats. McQueen swapped out the old wheels in favor of +1 rollers measuring 8 inches up front and 9 inches in the back. There’s also a switch on the dash to kill the rear lights in the event of a high-speed chase down Mulholland Drive. Did I mention McQueen was a badass?

“The car is rich in history. This is the last of the McQueen cars, really,” says McQueen’s son, Chad. 

A portion of the proceeds at auction will be donated to The Boys Republic, a non-profit treatment community for troubled youth based out of Chino, California. McQueen was a 1946 alumnus of the organization and attributes it with being the one place that turned his life around.

Continue reading for the full story.

Steve McQueen’s 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera Will Be Auctioned In Monterey originally appeared on topspeed.com on Saturday, 13 June 2015 12:00 EST.

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PostHeaderIcon Simon Hsieh Meets The New 911 Carrera GTS: Video

After just recently showing a video that highlights its entire lineup of current GTS offerings, Porsche has just released another one that focuses on the origin of this mid-level, performance-minded trim, the 911 GTS. This time, Porsche showed off the 911 GTS in one of the best ways possible: by letting a Porsche enthusiast do all the talking and driving.

That lucky enthusiast was Simon Hsieh, a Taiwanese architect and Porsche 911 collector, who talked about what makes the 911 Carrera GTS so special, and he does so while driving the car along some amazing twisty Taiwanese roads. Fittingly, Hsieh says that the GTS offers a “perfect combination” of precision that gives drivers a direct feel from the tires to the driver’s hands.

The current 911 Carrera GTS is positioned between the 911 Carrera S and the 911 GT3 in terms of price, performance and power. The 2015 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS starts at $114,200, with 430 horsepower and a 0-60 time as fast as 3.8 seconds. That’s 0.5 second faster than the 400-horsepower 911 Carrera S that starts at $98,900, and it is 0.5 seconds slower than the 475-horsepower 911 GT3 priced at $130,400.

Based on this video, it would be easy to assume that Porsche is preparing individual videos for the rest of the GTS lineup (Cayman, Boxster, Cayenne and Panamera) ahead of what we can only imagine is the eventual introduction of the all-new Macan GTS.

Simon Hsieh Meets The New 911 Carrera GTS: Video originally appeared on topspeed.com on Wednesday, 10 June 2015 17:00 EST.

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PostHeaderIcon Porsche Carrera GTS Goes From Racetrack To The Road: Video

It’s difficult to look at the 2015 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS without thinking that it exists solely because of Porsche’s obsessive need to make a car for every hyper-specific budget and taste. And the truth is that’s probably was why it was created, but that doesn’t matter, because Porsche has still made an excellent car. Slotting in between the S and the GT3, the GTS actually hits that sweet spot between race car and street car, which the S falls short of and the GT3 overshoots. But this is something that not a lot of people are aware of, thanks to the fact that not counting special editions, there are now 25 different variations of the 911 and you need to be quite the fanboy to keep them all straight.

Porsche has put out this video, seemingly just to remind us of just what the GTS is and why it exists. It’s the sort of thing that would be entirely unnecessary for a lot of automakers, but is a logical move for Porsche, and it’s not as though we could ever object to well-produced footage of a 911 on a race track.

Read on…

Porsche Carrera GTS Goes From Racetrack To The Road: Video originally appeared on topspeed.com on Tuesday, 26 May 2015 18:00 EST.

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PostHeaderIcon Video: Carrera GTS Is The Best Porsche 911 According to XCAR

The “GTS” badge has become a mid-level trim in the current Porsche lineup, and at least one reviewer thinks of the 911 Carrera GTS as the best 911 of the range. Alex Goy of XCAR recently proclaimed the RWD and PDK-equipped GTS he drove as “the ultimate 911 model.”

According to him, the 911 Turbo and Turbo S are too fast for normal consumption and the 911 GT3 is simply too hardcore as a daily driver, while the base 911 Carrera is a bit too… tame. His answer to “What is the best 911 out there?” is therefore the GTS. Every current Porsche sans the 918 Spyder is also featuring a GTS version. In fact, the first car to bear the GTS moniker in modern Porsche history was the Cayenne, a model that has almost nothing in common with the original Porsche 904/Carrera GTS or even the later 928 GTS.

Don’t think that I’m in any way against the 911 GTS though, as the model is actually more than welcome in my fantasy car garage. It’s just that from some perspectives, it is just a nicer-looking Carrera S with the Powerkit and some standard features that would cost extra on lesser models. In other words, it doesn’t seem special enough to justify it being called “best 911 version.”

Click past the jump to learn more about the 911 Carrera GTS.

Video: Carrera GTS Is The Best Porsche 911 According to XCAR originally appeared on topspeed.com on Wednesday, 11 February 2015 08:00 EST.

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PostHeaderIcon Three NFL Players Will Win Custom Porsche 911 Carrera With Cheetah Graphics

Being the fastest runner in the NFL Scouting Combine sure has its advantages. Besides bragging rights, prospects with faster 40-yard dash times usually get picked higher in the draft and are subsequently rewarded with more lucrative contracts, but sporting apparel maker Adidas is sweetening the deal for this year’s participants. In this case, the three NFL prospects with the fastest 40-yard dash times will each receive a “custom” Porsche 911 Carrera. But, as with everything else in life, there’s a catch.

In order to win these white 911s with gold wheels and their questionable cheetah wraps, the prospects must first sign an endorsement contract with Adidas before the combine takes place later this month. Those who choose to sign with Adidas (and are one of the top three sprinters) are then eligible to lay claim to one of these Porsche coupes. USA Today reports that last year’s fastest man, Brandin Cooks (now wide receiver for the New Orleans Saints), received $100,000 from Adidas for his 4.33-second 40-yard time. Just for comparison, a base 2015 911 Carrera costs $84,300, but that doesn’t include the gold wheels or the cheetah plastered on each side of the car, which is probably enough to leave Ricky Bobby and his “ME” cougar a little jealous.

In the end, the car and the giveaway are aimed at creating a little buzz for Adidas’ latest football cleats, the Adizero 5-Star 40. The cleats weight just 4.7 ounces and make use of high-strength, low-weight materials.

Click past the jump to read more about the Porsche 911 Carrera.

Three NFL Players Will Win Custom Porsche 911 Carrera With Cheetah Graphics originally appeared on topspeed.com on Tuesday, 10 February 2015 11:00 EST.

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1946 Chevrolet Other Pickups 1946 CHEVY 1/2ton Pickup Truck, RUST FREE, 98% Original, PERFECT PROJECT!
$5,000.00 (0 Bids)
End Date: Tuesday Nov-20-2018 16:18:04 PST
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1957 Chevrolet Other Pickups 1957 Chevy Pickup Truck 3200
$9,000.00
End Date: Saturday Nov-24-2018 11:37:38 PST
Buy It Now for only: $9,000.00
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1959 Chevrolet Other Pickups 1959 gmc 100 pickup
$510.00 (3 Bids)
End Date: Saturday Nov-24-2018 18:15:14 PST
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1965 Ford Mustang 1965 Ford Mustang Shelby GT 350 Clone Built 289 Tremec 5 Speed Power RackPinon
$10,200.00 (3 Bids)
End Date: Wednesday Nov-21-2018 14:34:13 PST
Buy It Now for only: $64,995.00
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1949 Chevrolet Other Pickups 1949 CHEVROLET 3100 PICKUP 100% ORIGINAL BARN FIND NO RESERVE
$4,860.00 (25 Bids)
End Date: Friday Nov-23-2018 15:27:09 PST
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1957 Ford Other Custom Ranchero 1957 Ford Custom Ranchero 
$15,100.00 (37 Bids)
End Date: Monday Nov-19-2018 14:15:00 PST
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1958 Chevrolet Other Pickups C10 1958 Chevrolet Apache Step Side Pickup Truck Southern California Hot Rod Truck
$12,300.00 (17 Bids)
End Date: Monday Nov-26-2018 18:30:00 PST
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1965 Ford Mustang Convertible 289 V8 Automatic, Power Top & Steering, Disc Brakes EASY RESTO Barn Find NO RUST
$7,987.01 (17 Bids)
End Date: Saturday Nov-24-2018 10:30:26 PST
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1966 Chevrolet C-10 1966 SHORT BED
$471.00 (15 Bids)
End Date: Saturday Nov-24-2018 16:52:00 PST
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1966 Chevrolet C-10 1966 Chevy C10 shortbed
$5,500.00
End Date: Sunday Dec-16-2018 6:00:56 PST
Buy It Now for only: $5,500.00
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2011 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor 2011 Ford F-150 SVT Raptor Pickup Truck Used 6.2L V8 16V Automatic 4WD
$25,778.90 (14 Bids)
End Date: Tuesday Nov-27-2018 8:58:20 PST
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1968 Chevrolet C-10 1968 C10 LS swapped slammed pick up with AC Shop Truck
$15,500.00 (30 Bids)
End Date: Wednesday Nov-21-2018 9:56:33 PST
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