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Archive for the ‘Porsche’ Category

PostHeaderIcon Watch A Brutal Crash At The ‘Ring Involving Over A Dozen Cars: Video

We all know the Nurburgring is one of the most dangerous tracks in the world. Mixing maximum speed with huge elevation changes, blind corners, and highly technical challenges, it’s no wonder Jackie Stewart dubbed this place The Green Hell. Throw in a slick racing surface and open lapping with amateurs, and things can get really ugly. Case in point, this 2-minute, 8-second video showing a first-person perspective of an incident that occurred earlier in the month, wherein a group of cars create a massive pileup around a fast section leading to Hatzenbach. After spotting cars stopped on track and a huge cloud of smoke, the driver shooting the video pulls off to the outside of the track, exiting his vehicle before attempting to flag down incoming cars and warn about the impending parking lot. Some cars manage to avoid crashing, while others spin out helplessly. One Porsche even slides backwards into the stationary racer that the cameraman had exited just moments prior.

The video was originally posted to Facebook by RE FS420, and has been making the rounds on the internet ever since. According to BridgeToGantry.com,
the original cause of the incident was a blown coolant hose on a 911 GT3 RS, which spilled fluid on the track, resulting in several drivers losing control. In total, 14 cars were involved, with two drivers requiring hospitalization, one of which needed to be cut free from his Audi and airlifted to emergency care.

It’s a chilling reminder of what can go wrong when pushing a car to its limits. Stay safe out there, folks.

References


2018 Porsche 911 GT3 RS - image 711585

Porsche 911 GT3 RS

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS

When it unveiled the 2016 Porsche Cayman GT4 in February 2015, Porsche finally did what gearheads had been asking for a very long time: it allowed the mid-engined Cayman to live up to its true potential, which had been kept leashed to prevent it from being faster than the base 911. Now that the first Cayman GT4 has come and gone and the mid-engined sports car it was based on received its mid-cycle update, it’s time for a new track ready coupe.

Ever since the first GT4 was announced, enthusiasts have been asking themselves whether Porsche will take things up a notch and develop a GT4 RS. But, despite favorable rumors and the fact that an RS version would make sense, a more powerful GT4 has yet to happen. This could change with the upcoming model, which has just been spotted testing on public roads. And even though there’s no confirmation whether it will be called the GT4 or GT4 RS, the new coupe will definitely pack a significantly beefed-up engine. So I’m tempted to go with an “RS” badge.

Updated 11/15/2017: Our spy photographers caught the upcoming Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 out for a new testing session – and as you can notice the exhaust pipes have moved out a few inches on each side.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche Cayman GT4 RS.

Spy Shots

November 15, 2017 – Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 caught testing once again


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS - image 745389

2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS - image 745396

Why Porsche Needs an Updated Cayman GT4?


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS - image 637442
“Imagine all the fun you could have with a lighter and more powerful Cayman.”

Before we jump into the details, let’s discuss why Porsche would even need a more capable Cayman GT4. As a full-fledged GT in the Porsche lineup, it would be weird for the GT4 not to evolve into a traditional nameplate like the 911 GT3. It could also use an “RS” badge, either in addition to the GT4 or as a replacement model. Even the turbocharged 911 GT2 got upgraded into an RS at some point, so why skip the Cayman GT4? I’m not looking for reasons against it, but I’m sure some might argue that the RS badge is restricted to the 911.

Fortunately, this isn’t true, as Porsche already used it (to some extent) on the 718 race car of the late 1950s. So using it for the Cayman wouldn’t hurt Porsche’s heritage, especially now that the Cayman also sports a “718” emblem. Also, the GT4 could be both lighter and more powerful. Porsche could use even more carbon fiber to shed more pounds and squeeze more power from the flat-six engine. Just imagine all the fun you could have with a lighter and more powerful Porsche that benefits from all the advantages of a mid-ship layout.

Exterior

left
right
“The new track car will be a mix between the previous Cayman GT4 and the facelifted 718 Cayman.”

The test car isn’t exactly relevant here, mostly because it doesn’t have all of the features that make the GT4 unique, but it’s by no means difficult to imagine what this track-ready sports car will look like. Simply put, it will be a mix between the previous Cayman GT4 and the facelifted 718 Cayman.

That said, look for Porsche to put all those aero features on the 718 Cayman’s new styling cues. Up front, highlight will include a slightly wider front end with a new bumper that will include wider vents. Naturally, the bumper will have a more aggressive design, the intakes will be bigger, while the splitter will suggest that you’re looking at the Cayman’s 911 GT3 equivalent. It will also have the new bi-xenon headlamps or the optional units with four-point DRLs.

Onto the sides, the wider wheel arches and beefed-up side skirts will be complemented by the new character lines above and below the side intakes and the revised door handles. Also look for new mirror caps and redesigned wheels, likely measuring 20 inches.


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS - image 715698

2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS - image 715699
“Much like the standard 718 Cayman, the GT4 will change dramatically around back.”

Much like the standard 718 Cayman, the GT4 will change dramatically around back. It will sport new taillights with 3D LEDs and four-point brake lights, as well as the vintage-looking black trip with integrated “Porsche” lettering. This features was first used on 1990s 911 Carreras and looks absolutely gorgeous on the Cayman. The wing and aggressive diffuser that make the GT4 stand out in the lineup will also get significant changes for improved performance.

All told, the 718 Cayman GT4 will retain the nameplate’s already familiar looks, but it will boast a more modern feel.

Interior


2016 Porsche Cayman GT4 - image 615251

Note: Previous Porsche Cayman GT4 interior pictured here.

“Much like its predecessor, it will have sports seats upholstered in leather and Alcantara for improved lateral support.”

Inside, the new 718 Cayman GT4 will come with a number of extras compared to the standard model. Much like its predecessor, it will have sports seats upholstered in leather and Alcantara for improved lateral support and a smaller sports steering wheel.

The Sport Chrono Package will be standard, as will be the “Sport Plus” button that stiffens the suspension, sharpens throttle response, and quickens the steering. The Track Precision App, likely in upgraded form, will enable drivers to gather data while on the track. Options should include carbon-fiber racing bucket seats, among other motorsport-inspired goodies.

On top of the GT4-specific features, look for all the updates that came with the Cayman’s facelift. The list includes a revised dash with new A/C vents and an updated instrument cluster. You’ll also be able to add USB ports, Apple CarPlay, Porsche Car Connect, and even a premium sounds system should you be willing to sacrifice the car’s tremendous lightweight nature.

Drivetrain


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS - image 637563
“There's no doubt that the GT4 will be the quickest and most powerful Cayman ever made, but the drivetrain is still a mystery as of this writing.”

There’s no doubt that the GT4 will be the quickest and most powerful Cayman ever made, but the drivetrain is still a mystery as of this writing. As you might remember, the 718 Cayman went turbo all the way, with both the 2.0- and 2.5-liter engines using forced induction. There have been reports that the GT4 might continue as a naturally aspirated car, but again, the specific engine is unknown.

“The Germans could also use a detuned version of the 4.0-liter in the 911 GT3 RS.”

Logic dictates that Porsche would go with an uprated version of the 3.8-liter flat-six that the previous GT4 borrowed from the 911 Carrera S, but the Germans could also use a detuned version of the 4.0-liter in the 911 GT3 RS. Either way, the flat-six will crank out well in excess of 400 horsepower. My bet is on around 430 horses, which will be a nearly 50-horsepower increase compared to the outgoing, 385-horsepower coupe.

The more powerful engine and revised chassis components will also return improved performance. With the previous GT4 able to hit 60 mph in 4.2 seconds, the revised track could hit the same benchmark in under four seconds. Top speed should also increase from 183 to around 187 mph.

Prices


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS - image 715615

It’s way too early to talk about prices here, but it’s safe to assume the GT4 RS will become the most expensive Cayman ever. With the previous GT4 priced from $84,600, the revised coupe will likely cost $90,000 before options.

Competition

2016 Lotus Evora 400


2016 Lotus Evora 400 - image 617787

Since 2009, Lotus has been giving the Cayman a good run for its money with the Evora. For 2016, the Brits have updated the sports car with a new body shell and a more powerful engine, making it a suitable competitor for the Cayman GT4 and the upcoming RS. The updated supercharged, 3.5-liter V-6 is now capable of 400 horsepower and 302 pound-feet of torque, which should be enough to pose a threat to the GT4 RS. The extra grunt also enables the Evora 400 to hit 60 mph in just 4.1 seconds and top out at 186 mph. This race car for the road will arrive in the U.S. with a sticker set at $89,900, which puts it on par with the GT4. Those not keen on rowing their own gears, the Lotus comes with an optional automatic transmission.

Find out more about the Evora 400 in our detailed review here.

2014 Alfa Romeo 4C


2014 Alfa Romeo 4C - image 505229

Alfa Romeo’s first mass-produced vehicle to arrive in the U.S. since 1995, the 4C is a milder proposition to the Cayman GT4 RS. Unlike the Porsche, it carries a much smaller, turbocharged, 1.75-liter four-banger rated at “only” 240 horsepower and 258 pound-feet of torque. Though it’s less powerful than the base Cayman, the 4C is quite quick in a straight line, needing only 4.5 seconds to reach 60 mph from a standstill. It might not be as track-focused as the Cayman GT4 RS, but it’s significantly more affordable at $54,000. There’s no word as to whether Alfa Romeo plans to build a more hardcore version of the 4C, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see one hit the streets in a couple of years.

Read more about the Alfa Romeo 4C here.

Conclusion


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 RS - image 715606

Though the Cayman GT4 is arguably the hottest compact sports car around, it’s hard not to dream about a more powerful version, especially since the first GT4 is long sold out. The GT4 RS would combine everything Porsche has learned while developing the new 911 GT3 with the advantages of a mid-ship configuration, which would result in a tremendous race car for the road. Moreover, a GT4 RS would also enable Porsche to develop a racing program for the Cayman and offer privateers a more affordable alternative to the 911. In the meantime, all we can do is keep our fingers cross for the Cayman GT4 RS to happen as soon as possible.

  • Leave it
    • Not confirmed for production yet
    • Would be pretty expensive

Update History

Updated 05/09/2017: Our spy photographers caught the upcoming Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 out for a first testing session.

PostHeaderIcon Latest Singer 911 Is a Beautifully Restored 964

Anyone who argues cars cannot be art has certainly never seen a Singer 911. All these cars are amazing works of arts, but this latest one, a 1990 Porsche 964 restored and modernized to the buyer’s detailed specifications, is just friggin’ mesmerizing!

This Singer 911 is the result of a joint Dynamics and Lightweighting Study “DLS” with Williams Advanced Engineering. The owner wanted his to car to be the embodiment of dynamism through lightness philosophy, and Singer obliged him by conducting one of the most thorough engineering works they have ever done. For this project they brought together some of the best names in automotive business, including Michelin, Brembo, and BBS Motorsport, as well as automotive authority Chris Harris and former racing driver Marino Franchitti.

It’s no wonder, then, the end result is so brilliant. It’s not just that this Singer 911 looks amazing as a complete object. You can stripe it apart to its building blocks, and each one of those is also a work of art. That includes the mechanical parts. Look at the whole engine assembly in the photo below and tell me it doesn’t belong in a museum of modern art?

The Williams connection means this Singer 911 benefits from a 500 horsepower four-valve, four-camshaft, naturally aspirated, air-cooled flat-six engine. They have also designed the aerodynamics and suspension geometry, and brought the know-how in using lightweight material such as magnesium, titanium, carbon fibre and other advanced materials. The car also gets carbon composite Brembo Brakes, BBS magnesium wheels, Hewland magnesium, lightweight 6-speed transmission, and bespoke Michelin Cup2 tires.

Visually, the completely overhauled 964 is finished Absinthe, a bespoke color inspired by Porsche’s vintage green, and it’s complemented with interior leather in Blood Orange. We dare say this 911 is on the par, in terms of beauty and art and general exquisiteness, with something like the Pagani Huayra.















The post Latest Singer 911 Is a Beautifully Restored 964 appeared first on Motorward.

PostHeaderIcon Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World

Ford F-150

Determining the value of a car brand can be a tricky exercise. There are so many variables to consider that ultimately, the results may differ from one study or another. What we do know is that, at the very least, the cream always rises to the top. The standings may be different depending on who the author of the study is, but it’s pretty much the same automakers making up a majority of the list.

In this exercise, we’re taking a look at the ten most valuable car brands, at least through the eyes of Interbrand, an independent agency that specializes in determining the world’s most valuable brands. Obviously, such a task involves creating a specific set of formulas and calculations using a variety of available information, including a company’s financial forecast and then using it with its own in-house-developed “role of brand” and “brand strength” calculations. If it sounds complicated, it’s because it is, especially in the current automotive climate where buzz words like “electrification,” “ride-sharing,” and “autonomous driving technology” have staked bigger pieces of influence among automakers of all shapes and sizes.

Even then, there are also certain requirements that each automaker has to meet to be eligible to be included in the list. These requirements include having a sales presence on at least three continents and having a third of a company’s revenue coming from its home market. Ultimately, it all boils down to a lot of tech jargon that’s a little above my head. What I can tell you, though, is that the final list that Interbrand came up with is both expected and revealing. A few notable names made it in predictable spots while a few surprise inclusions definitely raised our eyebrows.

Continue after the jump to read the full story.

10. Porsche


Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World - image 644852

Brand value: $10.13 billion

Top-selling model: Porsche 911

It seems crazy to think that at one point in the last 20 years, Porsche was a struggling automaker that somehow couldn’t get out of its own way. Things have definitely changed since then, and a big part of that is tied into the German automaker’s decision to enter a market that it previously shied away from. Taking a risk, Porsche ultimately decided to build the Cayenne SUV, and the rest is history. Today, Porsche cracks the top 10 list of “most valuable auto brands in the world” for good reason. It’s arguably one of the most beloved automakers in the world, and it’s rounded its model lineup to include a performance saloon known as the Panamera to go with a steady diet of sports cars led by the Porsche 911 Turbo.

9. Volkswagen


Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World - image 569578

Brand value: $11.52 billion

Top-selling model: Volkswagen Beetle

If you’re surprised that Volkswagen is so far down on this list, don’t be. This is Volkswagen the automaker, not the auto conglomerate that owns three brands on this list. On the bright side, VW actually posted improvements in terms of its brand value compared to last year. It’s incremental growth of just one percent, but it’s growth compared to 2016 when it actually posted a drop of one percent in value. Still, it could’ve been a lot better for Volkswagen had it not gotten itself mixed into the Dieselgate scandal. Look for a better year ahead for the German automaker when the calendar flips to 2018.

8. Nissan


Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World - image 656181

Brand value: $11.54 billion

Top-selling model: Nissan Sentra

If there was an automaker that earned its place in this ranking, it has to be Nissan. That’s not an indictment on the automaker’s past, but a celebration of what it has achieved in recent years. Between launching models that have been positively received and maintaining a level-headed approach in an industry that’s continues to evolve like this one, Nissan has turned in one growth year after another, culminating in a four-percent growth for this year that was good enough to land it in the top 10 list of most valuable car brands in the world.

7. Audi


Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World - image 635406

Brand value: $12.02 billion

Top-selling model: Audi A4

The Nissan of Europe, or is Nissan the Audi of Japan? Either way, the comparison fits because Audi always seems to be third fiddle in Europe to BMW and Mercedes-Benz, just like Nissan plays the same role in Japan to Toyota and Honda. That’s not a slight towards either Audi or Nissan because both companies have thrived doing their own thing. In Audi’s case, it has managed to build up a brand that’s worth $12.02 billion, becoming the most valuable auto brand under the Volkswagen Group. This year, Audi even posted a two-percent growth that probably should be bigger had it not been weighed down by Dieselgate. Still, look for Audi to remain competitive to BMW and Mercedes-Benz, as it always has been in recent years.

6. Hyundai


Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World - image 533707

Brand Value: $13.2 billion

Top-selling model: Hyundai Elantra

It says a lot about Hyundai’s growth as an automaker that it finds itself on this list with some of the most established brands in the auto industry. This wasn’t always the case though, as the Korean automaker’s surge up to mainstream popularity didn’t happen until the last decade. But, thanks to an aggressive push towards relevancy and the introduction of popular models like the Elantra, Tucson, and Santa Fe, Hyundai’s ascension up the ranks is looking less fluky and more of a result of hard work and dedication. Don’t even be surprised if, by next year, Hyundai finds itself in going up the ladder into a more prominent spot on this list. That’s the kind of outlook we’re now expecting from a company that already increased its value year-on-year by at least five percent.

5. Ford


Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World - image 700456

Brand value: $13.64 billion

Top-selling model: Ford F-Series Trucks

Ford is the only American automaker on this list. It is a little bit embarrassing to see what’s become of General Motors and Chrysler, but at least Ford is representing the US here to a certain extent. The good news for the Blue Oval is that it posted a five-percent increase in its own value and getting it up to $13.64 billion. The bad news is that a lot of the automakers its ahead of have as good a chance as any to move up the rankings for next year’s list at the expense of Ford. I personally don’t think that’s going to happen because of the company’s strong foothold in one of the world’s biggest markets, but then again, stranger things have happened so it’s not a certainty that the automaker will retain its spot in the rankings. It is worth pointing out though that of the ten auto brands that made it on this list, only Ford can boast of having a pickup truck as its top-selling model. That counts for a win, right?

4. Honda


Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World - image 651046

Brand value: $22.70 billion

Top-selling model: Honda Civic

Barring the unlikely event of seeing something catastrophic come out of Honda, it looks like a certainty that Honda’s going to retain its status as the fourth most valuable auto brand in the world for the next few years. That’s because it’s brand value of $22.70 billion is on an island by itself. Ford needs to almost double its value to be able to even sniff Honda’s, and conversely, the Japanese automaker needs to double its own value in order to come close to competing against the company that sits third on this list. Still, a value of $22.7 billion is nothing to sneeze at, especially when it comes as a result of a three-percent growth compared to its value from the previous year. The timeless popularity of the Honda Civic has a lot to do with Honda being where it is, but so does the continuing presence of its robust crossover and SUV lineup that’s led by the CR-V. Look for Honda to remain one of the most valuable auto brands in the world for all the reasons I just mentioned.

3. BMW


Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World - image 629375

Brand value: $41.62 billion

Top-selling model: BMW 3 Series

Well, that was a huge leap, wasn’t it? From Honda’s $22.7 billion in brand value, we move up to BMW’s, which has a brand value of $41.62 billion. This is the power of what BMW has to offer and the niche it has carved for itself – sportier than an Audi, less uptight than a Mercedes – tells you exactly how the German automaker has built up its own brand to become a force to be reckoned with it in the industry. It still has a few miles to go before it can catch up to its biggest rival, but rest assured, the blueprint towards long-term success and sustainability is being put to good use. For one, a plethora of new models with more advanced tech features are scheduled to be released soon to complement some of Bimmer’s most popular model lines. Imagine what kind of cache it can gain with the release of the BMW 8 Series? For all of its success, it is quite ironic that BMW finds itself in this enviable position despite minimal movement on its brand value.

2. Mercedes-Benz


Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World - image 536045

Brand value: $47.83 billion

Top-selling model: Mercedes C-Class

The king of German automakers finds itself in the second spot, trailing only the king of Japanese automakers. It should be said that Mercedes’ ascension up the ranks didn’t happen by luck or sheer happenstance. It comes as a result of record-breaking sales that helped pave the way for the company to enjoy its highest profits and revenue in its entire history. Add that to its ever-increasing global popularity and the introduction of affordable models like the CLA-Class, and it becomes clearer and clearer as to why Mercedes-Benz actually increased its brand value by a whopping 10% year-on-year. At the very least, it created a big separation with BMW’s own brand value, something I’m sure the fine folks over at Mercedes are more than happy to point out.

1. Toyota


Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World - image 509693

Brand value: $50.30

Best-selling model: Toyota Corolla

Sitting pretty at the number one spot is Toyota, a position it has held for a few years now on the back of being the biggest automaker in the world. Toyota’s dominance as a carmaker can be best seen in the fact that it still holds a pretty good lead over Mercedes-Benz despite seeing its value take a dip by six percent. That tells you that there’s room for Toyota to have a down year and still reign supreme as the most valuable auto brand in the world. I don’t see the company’s status get challenged for at least a few more years, but that loss in value could become more worrisome if it starts becoming a trend. For now, the auto world still kneels at the feet of Toyota, as do companies like Netflix, Facebook, McDonalds and Disney for that matter.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 GT2 Tests Top Speed On The Autobahn: Video

We love videos like this. They just feel right – Stuttgart’s performance superstar going flat-out on an unrestricted stretch of the autobahn? Yes, please! Assuming the starring role is a 991-era GT2 RS, which was introduced just a few months back rocking an incredible 700 horsepower and 553 pound-feet of torque thanks to a twin-turbo, 3.8-liter, flat-six powerplant hanging out back. Properly applied, Porsche says it’s enough motivation to push the German powerhouse to 211 mph. That’s blisteringly quick but, as evidenced by the above-featured 3-minute, 22-second video, the 911 GT2 RS might go much, much faster.

After some nice establishing shots showing a selection of 911s out on the track, plus a silver GT2 RS filling its tank at a gas station, the video moves to an angle of the gauge pod, where we watch the machine accelerate from a standstill. The driver engages launch control and takes off like a scalded cat, very quickly passing the ploddingly slow speed limits we must endure here in the U.S. The driver stays in it, maxing out the revs in every gear before eventually topping out at an incredible 356 kph (221.2 mph) as indicated by the onboard speedometer. Apparently, a separate GPS device recorded 342 kph (212.5 mph), which is still pretty damn quick, if you ask us. Either way, it’s impressive to watch as this track-bred piece of precision engineering is taken to the limit. There are even some ending glory shots of the GT2 RS paying its respects at Porsche headquarters.

References

Porsche GT2


2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS - image 721894

Read our full review on the 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS.


Money Talks: The 10 Most Valuable Car Brands In The World - image 744848

Read more Porsche news.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche Mission E GTS

2021 Porsche Mission E GTS

In case you hadn’t heard, let me be the first to tell you – Porsche is building a four-door all-electric sports sedan, and it’s called the Mission E. Don’t worry, it’ll have all the go-fast characteristics you’d expect, just without the internal combustion to make it go. In fact, it should draw a good deal of its tech from the hybrid goodness developed for the Panamera and 918 Spyder, so that’s a plus. But, as we all know, Porsche isn’t satisfied to make just a single version of any one model. Multiple variants are required to fill every niche possible, so what about an even-faster Mission E? We’re calling it the Mission E GTS, and we decided to draw up a rendering and put together a speculative review to boot. Upgrades over the standard Mission E should include more aggressive exterior styling, lots of black trim pieces, more performance gear inside, a bigger battery, extra horsepower, and standard performance suspension.

The EV performance market is looking to balloon pretty rapidly over the next few years, and you can bet your lithium-ion battery pack Porsche will be there to take advantage of that growth. Read on for the details.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2021 Porsche Mission E GTS.

Exterior

  • Larger aero than standard model
  • Blacked-out trim pieces
  • Lowered ride height

2021 Porsche Mission E GTS - image 743629
“The Porsche Mission E GTS will be a somewhat unique entry in the Porsche model lineup”

From the off, the Porsche Mission E GTS will be a somewhat unique entry in the Porsche model lineup. Of course, the traditional Stuttgart styling will be included, looking like an amalgamation of the 911, the 918 Spyder, and the Panamera. The nose will be rounded, curving downwards toward the pavement, with a wide and low stance to give it a definitively sporty flavoring. The hips will be broad, while the roofline will fall towards the truncated rear end at a gradual angle.

However, as is tradition for Porsche’s hotter GTS line, the Mission E GTS will get a few noticeable aesthetic changes to help it stand out from its standard, non-GTS siblings. Extra aggression will be the primary focus, with features like bigger wings, more prominent intakes, larger swoops, and similar details.


2021 Porsche Mission E GTS - image 743630
“As is tradition for Porsche’s hotter GTS line, the Mission E GTS will get a few noticeable aesthetic changes to help it stand out from its standard, non-GTS siblings.”

The front end will get the Mission E’s unique headlight design, which places the housings high on the fenders with a small teardrop shape framed by a prominent check mark crease. Lower horizontal daytime running lights emphasize the car’s width. LEDs will be the lighting element of choice.

Moving to the flanks, we find large wheels with a black finish, complementing the various blacked-out trim pieces, grilles, and mesh inserts that are so common on Porsche’s GTS models. The side sills get curvy ground effects that bring the car closer to the ground, a characterstic enhanced by the lowered ride height. The fenders will be broad to encapsulate the larger wheels.

In back, we’d expect to see a bigger diffuser element, once again in black, while above will be a larger wing for extra downforce. We’d also expect the wing to be adaptive, rising and falling to provide either more stick or less drag as the situation dictates.

Interior

  • Lots of Alcantara upholstery
  • Sporty seats
  • Steering wheel inspired by the 918 Spyder

2018 Porsche Panamera - image 701991

Note: Porsche Panamera GTS pictured here.

“We’re gonna go with the Panamera GTS as a reference, and we would expect a similar layout and similar upgrades applied to the Mission E GTS.”

While we have yet to actually see the interior of the Porsche Mission E, there’s still a few predictions we could make about a possible GTS version at this early point. First off, we’re gonna go with the Panamera GTS as a reference, and we would expect a similar layout and similar upgrades applied to the Mission E GTS.

For starters, the dash will likely incorporate a broad, horizontal design, with lots of wide lines that add a sense of space. The seating arrangement will include space for up to five passengers, with two up front and three in the rear, plus a little space in the trunk to haul around a suitcase or two. The steering wheel will draw inspiration from the 918 Spyder in terms of design, while digital screens will be used for user inputs and data relays.

“Upgrades for the GTS model will include even sportier seats, with larger side bolsters to keep passengers in place while cornering, plus Alcantara upholstery.”

Upgrades for the GTS model will include even sportier seats, with larger side bolsters to keep passengers in place while cornering. Alcantara upholstery will be the material of choice, and should be added to the seatbacks, the side panels, the doors, and just about anything else Porsche can manage. Finally, brushed aluminum and carbon fiber trim will add that extra bit of gloss.

Drivetrain

  • Four electric motors, AWD
  • Up to 350 miles per charge
  • More power – up to 650 ponies
  • 0-to-60 mph in 3 seconds flat

2015 Porsche Mission E Concept - image 736441
“The Mission E GTS will be all-electric, routing motivation to the ground by way of four individual permanent synchronous electric motors”

Like the standard Porsche Mission E, the Mission E GTS will be all-electric, routing motivation to the ground by way of four individual permanent synchronous electric motors, essentially making it AWD. There will also be multiple drive modes, from eco energy saving to maximum attack sport.

The GTS could enhance this with a special sport mode that throws caution (and range anxiety) to the wind for even greater acceleration. Luckily, the Mission E GTS would also likely get a bigger battery pack, offering both greater range per charge and more horsepower as a result. Once again placed under the floor, the larger lithium-ion pack would provide upwards of 350 miles per charge, a substantial increase compared to the standard Mission E’s 300 or so miles per charge. And, if Porsche delivers on its promise, charge times should be pretty quick thanks to the brand’s forthcoming proprietary 800-volt charging system.

“The Mission E GTS would likely get a bigger battery pack, offering both greater range per charge and more horsepower as a result. We’re thinking 650 ponies total.”

But here’s the important bit – we would expect more power from the GTS, up to roughly 650 ponies compared to the standard model’s 600 horsepower. That would make it quicker, and when placed in its sportiest mode, the 0-to-60 mph time should drop to around 3 seconds flat compared to the standard model’s 3.5-second sprint.

Chassis And Handling

  • Standard adaptive suspension
  • Less weight
  • Faster Nurburgring lap time

2021 Porsche Mission E GTS - image 743629
“The Mission E GTS will utilize a unique chassis made specifically for all-electric applications”

Under those freshened body panels, the Mission E GTS will utilize a unique chassis made specifically for all-electric applications. The platform should provide just the right stuff to make the car enjoyable in the corners, while also taking advantage of the all-electric’s benefits and minimizing its drawbacks.

Unique to the GTS model will be additional sporting elements for the suspension, including standard active components for greater performance in the corners. We’d also expect to see a more advanced torque vectoring system, not to mention four-wheel steering as well.

“Unique to the GTS model will be additional sporting elements for the suspension, including standard active components for greater performance in the corners.”

Extra exotic materials, such as additional carbon fiber and titanium, should also be used, cutting out a few pounds here and there. Nothing major – just enough to maximize the newfound power gains and aggressive suspension.

All told, the GTS will be measured in terms of how it performs on the track. The Nurburgring is the place where these things get the full shakedown – perhaps a time of 7 minutes, 45 seconds could justify the extra outlay.

Prices


2021 Porsche Mission E GTS - image 743631

With the Mission E expected to start at $85,000, a GTS version would likely put the bottom line at well over $100,000. However, if Porsche offers a stopgap between the base model Mission E and GTS model, such as an S iteration at $100,000, a price tag of $120,000 for the GTS would make a lot of sense.

Competition

Tesla Model S P100D


Tesla Model S Gets Upgraded Battery Pack; Now as Fast as LaFerrari and Porsche 918 Spyder - image 686181

If you want a fast four-door EV, Tesla is pretty much the standard these days. Sitting at the top of the heap is the P100D, an AWD crusher of 0-to-60 mph times that manages to complete the benchmark in just 2.3 seconds. That’s seriously quick, and would likely trounce the Mission E GTS. But here’s the thing – Porsche is more concerned with handling than Tesla, and given a proper race track, the Tesla would likely fall short. Same goes for the interior appointment, where Stuttgart once again has the upper hand. However, if balls-out acceleration is all you care about, Tesla is the way to go.

Read our full review on the 2017 Tesla Model S P100D.

Conclusion


2020 Porsche Mission E - image 740943

Note: Porsche Mission E test mule pictured here.

While at first glance it might seem absurd to render up a hot-to-trot iteration of a car Porsche hasn’t even released yet, there’s a method to our madness. In case you hadn’t noticed, Porsche absolutely loves offering a wide spectrum of performance versions for their most popular vehicles. Indeed, no stone is left unturned in the quest to satisfy speed enthusiasts, and there’s no reason the same formula won’t be applied to the Mission E.

In fact, it’s practically required when looking at the current EV market. Tesla is obviously one of the biggest names here, and with a variety of model variants on offer for more speed, more range, and more bragging rights, Porsche can’t ignore the obvious.

  • Leave it
    • Might be very pricey
    • Base Mission E will need to see success before a GTS model is a thing
    • What will the EV performance market look like in 2021?

References

Porsche Panamera

Porsche 918 Spyder

Porsche 911

Tesla Model S

PostHeaderIcon Porsche Classic Vehicle Tracking System Protects Your Baby

No, not your actual baby. We mean your vintage Porsche which, let’s be honest, is less annoying and looks better than your actual baby. To help you protect it from the thieves and unauthorized drivers, the company has launched the Porsche Classic Vehicle Tracking System. It’s a GPS-based tracker for modern cars, now available for vintage models as well. 

Porsche Classic Vehicle Tracking System is something they should have launched years ago. There is definitely a market for it. I mean, people put their jewelry in ultra-secure safes and vaults, and they all come down to what, a 100 grand? The most basic vintage Porsche can cost a couple hundred, and the owners often leave it on the street relying on a fifty-year old lock to keep it safe. This tracker helps you keep a closer eye on your prized possession.

It’s a very advanced system, this Porsche Classic Vehicle Tracking System. It communicates with a security network that covers the whole of Europe. And it’s a lot more than just a tracker. It works in tandem with Porsche Classic app. If the battery is disconnected on a vehicle that is being monitored, or if the vehicle is stolen, the associated free app sends an alarm alert to the international security centre and to the customer. There is also the option to use a wireless command to prevent the engine from being restarted.

The security system can be tailored to your needs and installed on any Porsche from the 356 to the Carrera GT. It becomes available from spring 2018 onwards at Porsche Classic Partners and Porsche Centres across Europe.

The post Porsche Classic Vehicle Tracking System Protects Your Baby appeared first on Motorward.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche Settles With Paul Walker’s Daughter

The death of Paul Walker almost four years ago still leaves a bad taste in a lot of people’s mouths. Well, if closure is what we need, we might have finally gotten it after the late actor’s daughter, Meadow Walker, has come to a settlement with Porsche, finally putting to bed the wrongful death lawsuit she filed against the German automaker.

Details of the settlement are kept confidential, but a report from ABC News indicates that the two sides have agreed on the course of action. Separately, Porsche also settled a different lawsuit filed by Paul Walker’s father, Paul Walker III, the acting executor of the late actor’s estate. The settlement isn’t going to bring Walker back to life, but it does go a long way in both parties finally putting all enmities to rest. It certainly didn’t look that way when Meadow Walker filed her lawsuit in 2015, claiming that the Porsche Carrera GT that Walker was riding in when it crashed and burned lacked the safety features that would’ve saved her father’s life. Porsche soon rebutted Walker’s allegations, saying that the actor “knowingly and voluntarily assumed all risk, perils and danger in respect to the use of the subject 2005 Carrera GT,“ before adding that any alterations, abuse, and misuse of the Carrera GT “caused
or contributed to the incident and to Mr. Walker’s death.”

There’s no question that the legal battle between Meadow Walker and Porsche looked as if it was going to get ugly at some points. Both sides stood their ground and from afar, it became quite uncomfortable for a lot of people to choose sides between the two. Fortunately, the settlement eventually won out and all parties involved – Meadow Walker, Porsche, and those directly and indirectly involved in all of the proceedings – can now move on and leave all the legal mess behind. It’s been a long four years for those people and I can only hope that they can find peace knowing that this dark chapter in their lives is now on the verge of getting closed.

And for his part, Paul Walker deserves to rest in peace. Now that he knows that his daughter will get hers, he may finally get to do that. We all still miss you though, Paul. Look what the Fast and Furious franchise has become without you.

References

Porsche Carrera GT


2004 - 2007 Porsche Carrera GT - image 630994

Read our full review on the 2004-2007 Porsche Carrera GT.


Celebrity Special – Happy Birthday Kimi Raikkonen! - image 738928

Read more celebrity news.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 908

Introduced in 1968, the Porsche 908 was created as Stuttgart’s more-focused shot at competition success in the FIA’s Group 6 Prototype-Sports Cars class. The car is simple and completely stripped of any fluff whatsoever. Outside, the 908 gets a short, flat body made from fiberglass (both coupe and spyder variants were created), as well as simplified aerodynamics. The driver sits very far forward, his or her feet hanging ahead of the front axle to make room for the 3.0-liter flat-eight engine. With as much as 350 horses on tap, the 1,100-pound 908 was basically like a big racing kart, beating its heavier, more powerful competition on the twisty, more narrow tracks of the sports car series.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 908.

Exterior

  • Includes both a coupe and spyder version
  • Very simple, flat design
  • Rear stability fins added in 1971
  • 15-inch wheels

1970 Porsche 908 - image 727852
“The 908 is like a smooth, short, slap of speed, a wedge that cuts into the atmosphere with purpose and poise”

Like just about any other successful, self-respecting race car, the 908 is all business, all the time. You won’t find an ounce of fat or fluff on it, all the way down to the exterior styling. Simplicity is the name of the game here, simplicity and lots of flat, straight lines. The 908 is like a smooth, short, slap of speed, a wedge that cuts into the atmosphere with purpose and poise.

The nose rises up in a single sweeping motion, housing the wheels underneath a single body panel stretching towards the rear of the vehicle. The flanks take a 90-degree turn at the shoulder line, falling straight towards the pavement in a single, uniform panel. Towards the rear, the tail flicks upwards, forcing the air to push the rear end into the ground.


1970 Porsche 908 - image 727829
“In 1971, the 908 was modified to include twin rear fins.”

The whole thing was made from fiberglass, which keeps the curb weight remarkably low. Although the first 908 models (also known as the 908 LH) used a hardtop coupe body style, a design that created the kinds of low of drag preferred for high-speed tracks, the more popular 908/02 (produced from 1969 and onwards) used a more lightweight, open top spyder body style. Long tail versions were also in use, both for coupe and spyder iterations, offering even more high-speed capability. The standard vehicle length was measured at 190.5 inches.

In 1971, the 908 was modified to include twin rear fins, a feature that undoubtedly increased the vehicle’s lateral stability significantly.

Finally, the wheels are measured at 15 inches in diameter, a relatively small size compared to the mammoth rollers used on modern performance vehicles. Keeping them in place is a center lock device.

Interior

  • Simple layout
  • Tight squeeze in the driver’s seat
  • Seating position hangs the driver’s feet ahead of the axle

1970 Porsche 908 - image 727841
“Like the car’s exterior, the 908’s interior is about as basic as simple as they come”

Like the car’s exterior, the 908’s interior is about as basic as simple as they come. You only get what’s needed to go fast, which, as it turns out, isn’t a whole lot. Pilots are secured in place thanks to a racing harness and fixed-back racing seat, while gripping a thin-spoke, flat-bottom steering wheel. To the right is the shifter knob, while a single rearview mirror is placed to the left on top of a tall, thin spoke. A large tachometer is mounted just behind the steering wheel, while a few other gauges are placed in close vicinity to provide all the pertinent info. The rest of it is a crisscross of metal bars and supports, surrounding the driver in a spider web of metal.

“The driver is so far ahead in the chassis, his or her feet actually hang ahead of the front axle.”

Interestingly, the driver’s position is very much towards the nose in the chassis, thus allowing the heavier engine to be placed more towards the middle of the car and evening out the weight distribution. In fact, the driver is so far ahead, his or her feet actually hang ahead of the front axle. The design also places the driver a bit to the right in the chassis, which helps the car slinging around right-hand turns with more agility (the 908 tackled tracks where the majority of turns were to the right, for example, the 24 Hours of Le Mans at the Circuit de La Sarthe in France).

Drivetrain

  • Naturally aspirated 3.0-liter flat-eight
  • 350 horsepower
  • Topped out at 170 mph
  • Later equipped with a turbo 2.1-liter flat-six

1970 Porsche 908 - image 727844
“The real party piece for the 908 is placed right behind the driver’s seat, where Porsche mounted a naturally aspirated 3.0-liter (2,990 cc) flat-8 engine”

The real party piece for the 908 is placed right behind the driver’s seat, where Porsche mounted a naturally aspirated 3.0-liter (2,990 cc) flat-8 engine. This was the original lump found in the 908/01, /02, and /03, offered as a follow-up to the preceding Porsche 907, which got a 2.2-liter (2,200 cc) flat-eight engine making about 270 horsepower. By contrast, the new flat-eight engine produced peak output of 350 horsepower at 8,400 rpm, a substantial increase by any measure.

Standout features include air-cooling, plus 2 valves per cylinder. While the Porsche engine was similar in many respects to contemporary F1 engines, the 908’s 3.0-liter flat-eight produced about 50 horsepower less than the GP cars. However, this lower peak output was offset with greater long-term reliability, with the 908 managing to put in the time during lengthy endurance stints compared to the F1 equivalent’s relatively short sprints.

“While the Porsche engine was similar in many respects to contemporary F1 engines, the 908’s 3.0-liter flat-eight produced less power”

Further standout features included mechanical fuel injection and dual overhead cams. Critically, the engine weighed less than 400 pounds, an important characteristic considering the 908’s primary role as a lightweight corner carver, as opposed to a brute force, straight-line super star like the Ford GT40. However, with a long enough strip of pavement in front of it, the 908 could still reach a top speed of 170 mph. Routing the power to the rear wheels was a five-speed manual transmission.


1970 Porsche 908 - image 727846
“With a long enough strip of pavement in front of it, the 908 could reach a top speed of 170 mph.”

Later lightweight open-top versions of the 908 saw its top speed decreased slightly, due to the increased drag created by no roof. The later 908/03 version also got a power increase, up to 370 horsepower. Even later, the 3.0-liter eight-cylinder was replaced by a 2.1-liter turbocharged flat-six with the 908/04 model, and some examples produced upwards of 500 horsepower or more thanks to the forced induction.

Chassis And Handling

  • Weighed just 1,100 pounds
  • Aluminum tube frame chassis
  • Fiberglass body
  • Short wheelbase iteration came later

1970 Porsche 908 - image 727830
“Under the fiberglass body panels, the 908 uses aluminum tube frames for the chassis.”

Under the fiberglass body panels, the 908 uses aluminum tube frames for the chassis. One of the 908’s greatest strengths was its incredibly low weight. Even in its race ready configuration, the 908 managed to tip the scales at just 1,430 pounds. The racer got further help in 1969 thanks to a rule change to the Group 6 prototype class, wherein Porsche managed to cut out as much as 220 pounds by removing the of roof and long tail body work. It was changes like this that ultimately made the 908 the preferred choice when taking on tight tracks, at least compared to the larger, more powerful Porsche 917, which was better suited to high speeds and longer straights.

This characteristic was reinforced when Porsche introduced the 908/03, shortening the wheelbase and giving the car an even nippier attitude. What’s more, the open-top 908/03 weighs in at just 1,100 pounds, a substantial 800 pounds less than the Porsche 917K.


1970 Porsche 908 - image 727831
“The open-top 908/03 weighs in at just 1,100 pounds, a substantial 800 pounds less than the Porsche 917K.”

Helping the 908 stop are disc brakes, while a rack-and-pinion steering system helps pilots turn the thing. In the corners, the suspension set-up utilizes double wishbones in front, including coil springs, hydraulic shocks, and an anti-roll bar. Meanwhile, the rear gets reversed lower wishbones, plus top links, twin radius arms, coil springs over hydraulic shocks, and an anti-roll bar.

Prices


1970 Porsche 908 - image 727833

With its long, successful career in motorsport, it should come as no surprise that the Porsche 908 has become quite the collectible automobile. Some examples easily reach into the seven-figure range, with desirability depending on factors like individual vehicle condition and history.

The particular example draped in yellow that you see here is a 1970 Porsche 908/03, the same car that was driven by Hans Herrmann and Richard Attwood at the 1970 Nurburgring 1000 KM for a second-place overall win. It’s one of only 13 examples built in 1970. One lucky collector snagged it at the 2017 edition of the RM Sotheby’s auction in Monterey for $3.575 million.

Competition

Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 (33TT3)


1970 Porsche 908 - image 740385

Alfa was quite active in sports car and prototype racing in the ‘60s and ‘70s, most notably with the Tipo 33 racer. As the Italian brand’s racer, active between 1967 and 1977, the 33TT3 generation was the 908’s primary competition, introduced in 1969 as a followed-up to the 33/3 from 1967. Like the 908, the Alfa Romeo 33TT3 also got a 3.0-liter V-8 engine. Output in the Alfa comes to 440 horsepower at a screaming 9,800 rpm, a substantial wallop considering the car’s feathery 1,500- pound curb weight. What’s more, the Tipo also secured some screen time in Steve McQueen’s Le Mans. All told, the 33TT12 managed to take the win for Alfa in 1975 in the World Championship For Makes.

Ferrari 312 PB


1970 Porsche 908 - image 740384

Ferrari introduced the Ferrari 312 PB in 1971 to participate in the Group 6 Prototype-Sports Car class, then continued on into 1972 and 1973 in the Group 5 Sports Car class. Originally dubbed simply the 312 P, the car was renamed “PB” to help differentiate it from the previous 312 P model. The Ferrari 312 PB came equipped with an aluminum monocoque and steel spaceframe, as well as double wishbones in front. Power was generated by a mid-mounted 3.0-liter flat-12 powerplant, which fed the rear wheels by way of a five-speed manual transmission. Similar in layout to the flat-eight of the Porsche 908, the Ferrari engine differed thanks to water cooling and four valves per cylinder. The Ferrari was also more powerful, but weighed more than the rival Porsche at a little over 1,400 pounds. The model was hugely successful in 1972, winning every single race it entered in the World Sportscar Championship.

Conclusion


1970 Porsche 908 - image 727828

While throwing gobs of power at a racer is usually a relatively easy, simple solution to going faster, the more difficult (but ultimately, superior) method is to make it handle brilliantly. Simply, add lightness, and all that.

That’s what we like about the 908. In some ways, it’s like the Lotus Elise of Porsches – low weight, no fluff, great handling, and capable of winning even when down on power. Although it took some time to perfect, the 908’s subsequent winning career is proof enough of its ability.

“That’s what we like about the 908 – low weight, no fluff, great handling, and capable of winning even when down on power.”

This is the sort of philosophy we want to see from Porsche’s future models – pure driving enjoyment, with a focus on cornering, not straight-line power. Indeed, this approach is already seeing a focus from folks like Andreas Preuninger, the head at Porsche’s GT division, who called for an “end to the horsepower wars” back in 2015.

All told, this is what sports cars are supposed to look like.

  • Leave it
    • Underpowered compared to competition
    • Rough start to career
    • Absurdly dangerous to drive

History And Background

  • Saw racing success after lengthy development
  • Raced against icons like the GT40
  • Took wins at the 1000 KM of Nurburgring in three separate decades

1970 Porsche 908 - image 727827
“The Porsche 908 was introduced in 1968 as response to the FIA’s rule change for Group 6 Prototype-Sports Cars”

The Porsche 908 was introduced in 1968 as response to the FIA’s rule change for Group 6 Prototype-Sports Cars. Preceded by the Porsche 907, the 908 was essentially a more serious continuation of an original design created by Ferdinand Piech, also known as the grandson of Porsche founder Ferdinand Porsche.

The rule changes saw engine displacement limited to 3,000 cc, similar to the engine spec used in Formula 1, thus giving the typically low-power (and low weight) Porsches a real shot at success in competition.

Thus, the 908/01 was born. Equipped with a 3.0-liter flat-eight engine, the 908 was capable of outmuscling the preceding 907, which came equipped with a 2.2-liter flat-eight making just 270 horsepower compared to the 908’s 350 horses. Interestingly, the 908 was the first Porsche sports car designed to use the maximum engine size permitted under homologation standards, signaling Stuttgart’s renewed commitment to winning.


1970 Porsche 908 - image 727843
“Equipped with a 3.0-liter flat-eight engine, the 908 was capable of outmuscling the preceding 907, which came equipped with a 2.2-liter flat-eight making just 270 horsepower compared to the 908’s 350 horses.”

Although showing promise right out the box with a win at the 1000 KM Nurburgring in its debut year, the preceding 907 managed to prove itself as the more successful model than the developing 908, winning more consistently over the course of the 908’s breakout year.

One of the 908’s biggest threats came from America – indeed, the Ford GT40 was on a rampage in the late ‘60s, outpacing the 908 thanks to its larger, meatier V-8. The more powerful Ford secured numerous wins on tracks where it could really open the taps, most notably the huge straights of the Circuit de la Sarthe, ground zero for the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Although it was postponed from June to September due to May Day protests in France, the 1968 running of the famous endurance event saw the 908 challenge the GT40 for dominance. Although Long Tail variants of the Porsche managed to grab top qualifying spots and run at the front for the outset of the race, Porsche’s technical problems saw several of the 908’s drop out, handing the win to Ford, followed by a 907 Long Tail and the one and only 908 that managed not to break over the course of the endurance event.


1970 Porsche 908 - image 727838
“At the 1968 running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the 908 challenged the GT40 for dominance.”

The 908 experienced ever more problems in 1969 at the 24 Hours of Daytona, wherein each of the three Porsche 908/02’s entered failed to complete the race. In the following 12 Hours of Sebring, the Ford GT40 once again secured a win, beating the three competing 908/02’s.

It was around this time that the Porsche 917 arrived, and considering the 908’s track record, most assumed it would be retired to the history books. Amazingly, the exact opposite happened – the 908 started to win, sweeping the podium in the BOAC 500 at Brands Hatch, beating the Ferrari 312P in the process. The 908 scored follow-up wins at such prestigious events as the 1000 KM Spa, 1000 KM Monza, and Targa Florio, and even managed to grab an impressive 1-2-3-4-5 finish at the 1000 KM Nurburgring. By the end of the 1969 racing season, Porsche had managed to secure the International Championship for Makes.


1970 Porsche 908 - image 727831
“Around the time the Porsche 917 arrived, most assumed the 908 would be retired to the history books, considering its rough career thus far.”

Porsche also managed to make a better showing at the 24 Hours of Le Mans that year, and although Ford once again grabbed the win, the 908 was near the front for much of the race, with Hans Herrmann snagging second-place in his 908. As the story goes, towards the end of the race, the 908 was running down its brake pads, and the Ford managed to sneak by under braking, giving the Blue Oval the win.

The follow-up 908/3 debuted in 1970, which was smaller than the preceding /02. As such, Porsche ran it as a preferred option on tighter, more twisty tracks over the much heavier Porsche 917. What’s more, Porsche continued to develop the 908, creating a new lightweight open-top spyder iteration that ultimately proved to be the more popular option over the course of the 908’s career. Based on the Porsche 909, the lightweight spyders offered team less weight than the already feathery coupes.


1970 Porsche 908 - image 727829
“Porsche continued to develop the 908, creating a new lightweight open-top spyder iteration that ultimately proved to be the more popular option over the course of the 908’s career.”

The 908 continued its streak of success on the track, managing to secure wins in the Nurburgring 1000 KM and the Targa Florio in 1970. At this time, the 908/02 also saw a win at the 12 Hours of Sebring, driven by the King of Cool himself, Steve McQueen. The actor/race driver was so impressed, he even decided to use the 908 as a camera car in his iconic film Le Mans.

In 1971, Porsche added a twin set of aero fins to the back end, significantly altering the car’s look in the process. That year, the 908 once again retuned to the Targa Florio. Although two of the entries failed to finish race, both crashing out on the first lap, the 908 still managed to set the fastest lap record. The following race was at the Nurburgring, where the 908 managed to sweep the podium in convincing fashion. As a result, Porsche ended up once again securing the International Championship for Makes, giving Stuttgart three straight titles between 1969 and 1971.


1970 Porsche 908 - image 727832
“Porsche ended up once again securing the International Championship for Makes, giving Stuttgart three straight titles between 1969 and 1971.”

By 1972, the rules had changed once again. The 908 was placed in the Group 5 Sport Car class, wherein the minimum weight was drastically increased, reducing the 908’s inherent advantage by a huge margin. What’s more, the Porsche saw heavy competition from a variety of powerful competitors. Rivals like Alfa Romeo and Ferrari suddenly held the advantage, and as a result, the 908 was sold to privateer racers while Porsche shifted its focus to development of the 917 for Can AM racing. Even still, Reinhold Jest managed a third-place finish at the 1972 24 Hours of Le Mans with a three-year-old 908.

By 1975, the 908 get a new turbocharged engine, similar in set-up to the lump found in the 934 GT. The 936 was also introduced around this time, slated for competition in high-profile races like Le Mans. In response, a variety of 908 owners decided to update their car with 936 bodies.

“By 1972, rivals like Alfa Romeo and Ferrari suddenly held the advantage, and as a result, the 908 was sold to privateer racers while Porsche shifted its focus to development of the 917 for Can AM racing.”

Between 1976 and 1981, the 908 participated in the Group 6 Two-Seater Racing Car class. And although the 908 was succeeded by the Porsche 936, some 908s were in competition straight into the ‘80s, coming equipped with a smaller turbo 2.1-liter flat-six engine. Incredibly, the 908 even managed to get a win at the 1000 KM of Nurburgring in three separate decades, nearly unheard-of accomplishment in the fast-paced world of top-shelf sports car competition.

References


1966 Porsche 906 - image 677949

Read our full review on the 1966 Porsche 906.


1969 - 1971 Porsche 917K - image 648494

Read our full review on the 1969-1971 Porsche 917k.


Trucks & SUVs Are The New High-Dollar Collectables - image 740178

Read more auctions news.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 911 Carrera T

2018 Porsche Carrera T

The Porsche 911 has gone through some big changes in the last couple of years, with the most important being Porsche’s decision to replace all naturally aspirated engines with turbocharged counterparts. While this was rather disappointing to some die-hard fans, it brought enhanced performance and fuel economy across the entire lineup. Porsche also revived the GT2 nameplate after a long absence and created the 911 R, essentially a limited-edition, wingless version of the GT3 for purists. Come 2017 and the German firm is offering yet another model aimed at purists and 911 Classic enthusiasts, but this time around is a significantly more affordable package. It’s called the 911 Carrera T and slots between the base Carrera and the GTS.

Inspired by the 911T, the company’s entry-level 911 between 1967 and 1973, the Carrera T is essentially a base Carrera with features taken off the more performance-oriented GTS. Fitted with a unique design elements inside and out, the Carrera T is also the first Carrera to get full bucket seats and rear-axle steering. The Carrera T is also lighter than the standard model, which makes it the lightest 911 available outside the GT3 and GT2 range. The added features and the lighter curb weight also makes it a tad quicker than the entry-level Carrera, placing it just below the Carrera S model in terms of performance. So while it’s not the least powerful and most affordable 911, as the 911T was back in the late 1960s, it’s a solid proposition for customers who want a no-nonsense Carrera but also desire access to the performance-enhancing features usually offered with the GTS model.

Continue reading to learn more about the Porsche 911 Carrera T.

Official video

Exterior


- Optimized spoiler lip

- Agate Gray highlights

- Lightweight rear windscreen and side windows

- Lowered suspension

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739972
“Up front, the 911 T is identical to the entry-level Carrera save for the aerodynamically optimized spoiler lip”

A 911 Carrera at heart, the T model has a hard time standing out in a pack of base 911 sports cars. Up front, the 911 T is actually identical to the entry-level Carrera save for the aerodynamically optimized spoiler lip. And even though it may sound fancy, this feature is actually not so different design-wise, which makes it difficult to spot. But there is one way to tell that a T isn’t a regular 911 Carrera, even when looking at the front end: the SportDesign mirrors are finished in Agate Grey, whereas the standard Carrera has them painted in the same color as the body.

More hints that this is a different model can be found on the sides, starting with the 20-inch, Carrera S wheels in Titanium Grey with a stripe bearing the “T” designation. A black stripe just above the side skirt contains “911 Carrera T” lettering. Finally, the coupe sits nearly half an inch closer to the ground thanks to the standard PASM sport suspension, but this isn’t exactly noticeable.


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739958
“The rear windscreen and rear side windows are made of lightweight glass”

A few extra features can be spotted around back as well. The louvers of the decklid grille, the badge, and the “911 Carrera T” lettering are all finished in Agate Grey, while the sport exhaust system has black tips. The rear windscreen and rear side windows are made of lightweight glass. Granted, the latter doesn’t change the way this 911 looks, but makes quite a different in the power-to-weight department. But more on that in the “Drivetrain” section below.

Paint options for the 911 Carrera T are as varied as they get and include Lava Orange, Black, Guards Red, Racing Yellow, White and Miami Blue. Metallic colors like Carrera White, Jet Black, and GT Silver are optional. It’s pretty cool that Porsche is offering Lava Orange, a color first launched with the GT3 RS, for 911 Carrera model.

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Interior

  • Optional bucket seats with rear-seat delete
  • Lightweight door handles and insulation
  • Shorter gear lever
  • GT Sport leather steering wheel

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739964
“It's the first 911 Carrera available with the Full Bucket Seats package”

The interior of the 911 Carrera T is actually a bit more exciting than the exterior, combining a range of race-inspired features that you can’t get on the standard Carrera. The coupe comes equipped with Sport Seats Plus as standard. These four-way electrically adjustable seats are finished in black, have “911” logos embossed on the headrests, and center sections made of Sport-Tex. But the big news lies in the fact that you can order the Full Bucket Seats package, a first for the 911 Carrera designation. The option also comes with a rear-seat delete to save even more weight.

Speaking of weight-saving measures, the standard door handles have been replaced with fabric loops. The cool thing about these is that they also give the door panels a race-inspired look. Further weight is saved by use of thinner sound insulation under the skin. This is Similar to the 911 GTS and yes, it makes the cabin a bit louder. But hey, it’s a sacrifice you have to make if you want a quicker Carrera without the GTS premium.


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739959
“A shorter gear lever with embossed shift pattern in red is standard”

Porsche also added a GT Sport steering wheel with leather rim and a switch for driving mode selection, as well as a shorter gear lever with embossed shift pattern in red. The trim on the dashboard and doors is black, which isn’t particularly exciting, but the Carrera T Interior Package adds contrasting colors in Racing Yellow, Guards Red or GT Silver. The latter add colored accents to the seat belts, the “911” logo on the headrests, the door opener loops, and the Sport-Tex seat surfaces.

Drivetrain

  • Standard rear differential lock
  • 11 pounds lighter than base model
  • A tenth-second quicker to 60 mph
  • Optional rear-axle steering

2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739977
“The Carrera T needs only 4.3 seconds to hit 60 mph a tenth-second quicker than the base Carrera”

The Carrera T draws its juice from the same 3.0-liter flat-six unit as the base 911 model. The turbocharged engine cranks out 370 and 332 pound-feet of torque, which is again identical to the entry-level model. Well, comparing specs on Porsche’s American website actually revealed there’s an extra pound-foot for the Carrera T, but that’s either a typo or it doesn’t make a difference in terms of performance. However, the standard manual transmission has a shorter constant transaxle ratio, while the mechanical rear differential lock is included at no extra cost.

What’s more, the Carrera T tips the scales at 3,142 pounds due to the weight-saving measures, which makes it 11 pounds lighter than the base Carrera and the lightest non GT 911 model available. Combined with the revised transmission, the PASM sport suspension, and the slightly lighter curb weight, the Carrera T needs only 4.3 seconds to hit 60 mph from a standing start, a tenth-second quicker than the base Carrera. Top speed is rated at an exciting 182 mph.


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739992
“Unlike the 911 Carrera, the T model can be equipped with the optional rear-axle steering”

When equipped with the optional PDK transmission, which also adds a launch control feature, the Carrera T completes the same benchmark in four seconds flat, which is not only quicker than a similarly equipped base Carrera, but also a tenth-second faster than the more powerful Carrera S with a manual transmission. Top speed for this model sits at 180 mph, a tad lower than the manual version.

Unlike the 911 Carrera, the T model can be equipped with the optional rear-axle steering, which is a cool thing to have on a non Turbo car.

Drivetrain Specifications

Engine 3.0-liter flat-six
Horsepower 370 HP @ 6,500 RPM
Torque 332 LB-FT
0 to 60 mph 4.3 seconds
Top Speed 182 mph
Weight 3,142 LBS

Prices


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739994

Pricing for the 911 Carrera T, which went on sale for the 2018 model year but won’t hit dealers until March, starts from $102,100, excluding the $1,050 delivery, processing and handling fee. That’s a $11,000 premium over the base 911 Carrera, which is reasonable given all the extra features. The T is also only $3,000 less than the Carrera S, which might be a problem if you like all that extra power. But hey, you’re getting a lot of GTS-specific stuff for nearly $19,000 less.

Porsche 911 Carrera T Manual $102,100
Porsche 911 Carrera T PDK $105,830

Competition

Mercedes-AMG GT


2018 Mercedes-AMG GT C Coupe - image 700634

Although it’s an entirely different animal as far as drivetrain layout goes, with the engine being mounted in front of the cabin, the AMG GT was developed as a competitor for the Porsche 911. While modern to look at, the coupe also has a vintage vibe to it reminding of the Mercedes-Benz grand tourers of the 1960s. So it’s actually very similar to the 911 from this standpoint. The interior is of the same variety, blending race-inspired features with luxurious amenities, fine materials, and a wide range of options. Under the hood, the German two-door hides a twin-turbo, 4.0-liter V-8. Upgraded for the 2018 model year, the base AMG GT comes with 469 horsepower and 465 pound-feet of torque, which is significantly more than the 911 Carrera T. With almost 100 extra horses at its disposal, you’d be tempted to think that the AMG GT is significantly quicker, but the difference is far from overwhelming. The sprint to 60 mph takes 3.9 seconds, which is only a tenth-second faster than the Carrera T with the PDK. Of course, we’re talking about four tenths if compared to the manual variant, but you need to consider that the Merc is some $10K more expensive at $112,400.

Read our full story on the 2018 Mercedes-AMG GT.

Jaguar F-Type


2017 Jaguar F-Type - image 655250

Although not exactly a full-fledged competitor for the 911, the F-Type has what it takes to give Porsche’s finest a run for its money. The exterior design, credited to have helped revive the brand, is aggressive and downright gorgeous, while the interior is packed with premium features and state-of-the-art tech. Sure, it doesn’t have rear seats, but given that the Carrera T can be had with a rear-seat delete, I think it’s a pretty fair comparison. Much like the 911, the F-Type can be had with a wide selection of drivetrains. In the U.S., the range begins with a 2.0-liter four-pot that cranks out 296 horsepower. That’s obviously not enough for the Carrera, especially since this model is significantly slower from 0 to 60 mph at 5.4 seconds. To get something closer, you have to go with the coupe fitted with the 3.0-liter V-6 rated at 400 horses and AWD. This one needs 4.9 seconds. Sure, it’s still slow, but the F-Type that’s next in line uses a massive 5.0-liter V-8. This one cranks out 550 horses and gets to 60 mph in 3.9 seconds. The good news is that this model retails from $99,900, which makes it a bit more affordable than the 911 Carrera T.

Read our full review of the 2017 Jaguar F-Type.

Alpine A110


2017 Renault Alpine A110 - image 708518

Much like the F-Type, the A110 plays in a different league. Alpine did aim at Porsche with this car, but the smaller 718 Cayman. The reason why I’m including it here it’s because the A110 is a proper, no-nonsense sports car created specifically for the purist in you. Not only does it pay tribute to one of the greatest European sports car ever built, it also combined classic heritage with carbon-fiber, premium features, and a lightweight construction that puts a Porsche to shame. Tipping the scales at an incredible 2,381 pounds, the A110 is some 800 pounds lighter than the 911 Carrera T. Power is provided by a turbocharged, 1.8-liter four-cylinder rated at 252 horsepower and 236 pound-feet of twist. This may not seem like a lot compared to the 911 Carrera, but the solid power-to-weight ratio enables the A110 to hit 60 mph in 4.5 seconds. That’s still slower than the Porsche, but not by much. The good news is that the Alpine is significantly more affordable at under €60,000 (around $70,400 as of October 2017) in Europe, but the bad news is that it’s not available in the United States and there’s no word as to when it will cross the pond.

Read our full story on the 2017 Alpine A110.

Conclusion


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739967

Diversification is key to success nowadays and it’s probably why I’m not surprised that Porsche rolled out yet another version of the 911. However, I’m not really sure that the Carrera T was a necessary addition to the lineup. Sure, having a base Carrera with some GTS features is a cool idea that should appeal many enthusiasts in need of a purist sports car, but I have strong doubts that the Carrera T will be a high seller. Linking this coupe to the 1968 911T is also a nice thing to do, but it’s not exactly very similar to its ancestor. While the 911T was the entry-level 911, the new Carrera T slots between the base model and the GTS and costs almost as much as the Carrera S. But I guess these details don’t make much of a difference since the 911T isn’t among the most iconic versions of the 911.

  • Leave it
    • Almost as expensive as the Carrera S
    • Do we actually need the Carrera T?

Porsche 911T History


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 740173
“The 911T is known for having helpted Porsche become the first German manufacturer to comply with strict U.S. exhaust and emission control regulations”

Introduced in 1967, there years after Porsche had launched the iconic nameplate, the 911T was the most affordable version of the 911. The concept wasn’t exactly new. When production of the 356 came to an end in 1965, Porsche noticed that there was still a market for a four-cylinder car, especially in the United States, so the German firm created the 912, a 911 with less equipment and the 356’s 90-horsepower engine. The 912 was kept into production until 1967, when it was replaced by the 911T, which slotted under the 911L and later the 911E.

Unlike the 912, the 911T used a flat-six engine. The first version was sold with the base 2.0-liter rated at 110 horsepower, but a 1969 upgrade replaced it with a 2.2-liter mill that generated 123 horses, 30 horsepower less than the 911E and 57 less than the 911S. The engine was again upgraded for all models, including the 911T, to a 2.4-liter unit in 1971. But unlike the 911E and 911S, which used mechanical fuel injection, the 911T was carbureted. However, this wasn’t the case in the United States, where regulations forced Porsche to also add fuel injection to the T model. The output was rated 130 horsepower in Europe, while the fuel-injection U.S. model came with 140 horses on tap. In January, 1973, North American 911T engines were switched to Porsche’s then-new K-Jetronic Continuous Fuel Injection system from Bosch. These CIS-powered cars are were among the last 911Ts built and are usually referred to as 1973.5 models by enthusiasts.


2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T - image 739960

While not as iconic as other versions of the classic 911, the 911T is known for having helpted Porsche become the first German manufacturer to comply with strict U.S. exhaust and emission control regulations. The 911T is somewhat widely available in the U.S. right and if often considered a great starting point for collectors that want a first-generation Porsche 911. Prices vary depending on mileage and condition from as low as $40,000 to more than $120,000.

References

Porsche 911


2017 Porsche 911 - image 701926

Read our full review on the 2017 Porsche 911.


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739165

Read more Porsche news.

PostHeaderIcon 2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T – Back to Basics for Driving Fun

The pure, back-to-basics version of the 911 we’ve all been waiting for has now arrived. Well, it’s just been announced and won’t be released until early 2018. But when it arrives the Porsche 911 Carrera T is going to be the one for every purist. It features all the good, yummy things absent from the latest versions of the sports car. 

Granted, the 3.0 liter flat-six engine in the Porsche 911 Carrera T is twin-turbocharged. But that’s a compromise they had to make to get the 370 hp and 450 Nm output. And were it not for that output the 911 T would not have been able to sprint from 0 to 100 in 4.5 second and top 290 km/h flat out. Mind you, 4.5 second is the time set by the short-shift manual gearbox that’s standard. The optional PDK is even quicker at 4.2 seconds.

Other ‘pure’ features of the Porsche 911 Carrera T include a shorter rear axle ratio and mechanical differential lock, and lighter weight. This model comes with rear window and rear side windows made from lightweight glass, and sound proofing materials have been drastically reduced. What’s more, Porsche has removed the Porsche Communication Management (PCM) and the rear seats, but if you ask they put them back in at no cost. The 911 T also gets  PASM sports chassis as standard, lowered by 20 mm, the weight-optimised Sport Chrono Package, a shortened shift lever with red shift pattern and Sport-Tex seat centres. In all, the 911 Tis 20 kg lighter than the standard version.











Optionally, you can order the rear-axle steering system for the T, but it doesn’t really go with the whole ‘pure’ thing. Also, it makes the already fat price tag of 107,553 EUR to grow even more stout. Then again, Porsche 911 Carrera T, regardless of all the technical goodness, comes with one of 911 dynasty’s most legendary badges dating back to 1968. For that reason alone we reckon it’s worth the money.

The post 2018 Porsche 911 Carrera T – Back to Basics for Driving Fun appeared first on Motorward.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 718 Cayman GTS

Minor styling changes to the front and rear fascia

Introduced in 2005 as a hardtop coupe iteration of the ever-popular Porsche Boxster roadster, the Cayman gets all the same good stuff as its topless sibling, plus the added rigidity and aggressive looks of a fixed roof. The latest fourth-generation was introduced in 2016, dubbed the 718 after the racer Porsche built in the late ‘50s. Now, Porsche is adding a new GTS iteration for the 2018 model year, and although we’ve seen a Cayman GTS in the past, this is the first time the formula has been applied to the fourth-gen 718. Per usual, the upgrades include a marginal power increase, more standard equipment, blacked-out trim pieces, and high-end interior materials.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS.

Official video

Exterior


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739173
“The basics are completely unchanged – you still get a two-door coupe that’s low, wide, and rounded”

Per Porsche tradition, the 718 Cayman GTS looks only marginally different next to non-GTS iterations. The basics are completely unchanged – you still get a two-door coupe that’s low, wide, and rounded. The 911-inspired front end gets teardrop-shaped headlight housings, each with a set of quad lighting elements. The profile leads the eye rearwards, with a swept-back, streamlined shape, plus a prominent intake added just ahead of the rear wheels. The tail is curvy and short, bulging at the sides with sizable hips that give the whole thing a forward-leaning, raked stance.

Basically, it’s a two-door coupe version of the two-door Boxster roadster. We think it looks good, albeit a bit predictable.


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739167
“To help the GTS variant stand out, Porsche added a series of subtle, yet effective upgrades, including redesigned fascias and black trim pieces.”

To help the GTS variant stand out, Porsche added a series of subtle, yet effective upgrades. Kicking it off is a redesigned front fascia, which the Stuttgart automaker has dubbed “Sport Design.” Basically, this encompasses a new lower half for the front bumper, gaining tweaked intakes and additional black components that seem to stretch from fender to fender. The result is a wider look for the GTS.

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The Cayman GTS looks wider than the standard Cayman thanks to a new front fascia.

The complement the new front fascia, Porsche also added a few updates to the tail, although differences here are a bit more difficult to pick out.

Finally, a slew of black accents were added front to back, and include black badging and insignia, as well as a tint added to the front turn signals and taillights. Finishing it off are matte-black wheels, sized at 20 inches in diameter at each of the four corners.

Interior


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739169
“Step into the Cayman GTS’s interior, and you’ll find the traditional two-seat layout, just as you’d expect”

Step into the Cayman GTS’s interior, and you’ll find the traditional two-seat layout, just as you’d expect. The space is tight, hugging the passengers in the typical sports car fashion, while drivers grip a three-spoke multifunction steering wheel. Prominent handles can be found on the doors, while rounded air vents are on the dash. Adorning the center console is a digital infotainment screen, plus a plethora of buttons and switches to adjust the various onboard systems.

All pretty standard stuff, if we’re honest. However, much like the exterior, the GTS stands out thanks to a few choice upgrades. For starters, you’ll notice the Porsche chronometer placed high on the dash, a feature you’ll find on every Cayman GTS thanks to the standard Sport Chrono Package (more on that in the next section).


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739186
“Much like the exterior, the GTS stands out thanks to a few choice upgrades, including a standard chronometer, sport seating, and further black accents.”

Further upgrades include a variety of black accents, plus standard Sport Seats Plus

sitters specifically engineered to provide ample lateral support while exploring the Cayman’s lofty cornering abilities. High on the seats, you’ll find the GTS logo embroidered into the seat headrest, while Alcantara adorns the seats’ center sections. Further Alcantara was added to the steering wheel, center console, and door armrest.

Options include the Navigation Module Package and Connect Plus Package, as well as the Porsche Track Precision App, which basically relays pertinent track data to your smartphone as part of the Sport Chrono Package.

Drivetrain


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739165
“Displacement still comes in at 2.5 liters, but peak power is rated at 365 horses, 15 more than the S.”

Mounted behind the cabin, the Cayman GTS comes equipped with a turbocharged 2.5-liter boxer flat-four engine, the same lump you get with the Cayman S. As an upgrade over the standard 2.0-liter flat-four in the base model Cayman, the S produces as much as 350 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque, a sizeable increase over the base model’s 296 horsepower and 280 pound-feet. Properly motivated, the Cayman S can manage a run to 60 mph in 4.0 seconds and a top speed of 177 mph.

The GTS sees a little more added on top thanks to a new intake plenum and update to the turbocharger. Displacement still comes in at 2.5 liters, but peak power is rated at 365 horses, 15 more than the S. Sending the power to the rear axle is a standard six-speed manual gearbox, although a seven-speed double-clutch automatic (popularly known as the “Porsche Doppelkupplung,” or PDK), is also offered as an available option.


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739185
“The GTS sees a little more added on top thanks to a new intake plenum and update to the turbocharger”

Torque in the 718 Cayman GTS is rated at 317 pound-feet when equipped with a PDK, or 309 pound-feet with the manual transmission. Max torque hits at 1,900 rpm, lasting until 5,000 rpm with the PDK and 5,500 with the manual.

Clearly, the PDK is the faster option, and as such, acceleration with the seven-speed looks like 3.9 seconds to 60 mph – about a tenth of a second quicker than the S. Top speed is rated at 180 mph, 3 mph faster than the S.

Finally, the GTS comes standard with a sport exhaust, finished with black pipe tips to complement the rest of the black trim.

2015 Porsche Cayman GTS Porsche 718 Cayman S 2018 Porsche Cayman GTS
Cylinder layout / number of cylinders Boxer engine / 6 Boxer engine / 4 turbocharged flat-four
Displacement 3.4-liter 2.5 liter 2.5-liter
Engine layout Mid-engine Mid-engine Mid-engine
Horsepower 340 HP @ 6,700 RPM 350 HP @ 6,500 RPM 365 HP @ 6,500 RPM
Torque 280 LB-FT 309 LB-FT 317 LB-FT
Top Track Speed 177 mph 177 MPH 180 MPH
0 – 60 mph 4.7 seconds 4.4 sec/4.2 sec (4.0 sec w/ Sport Chrono) 3.9 seconds

Chassis And Handling


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739179
“The Cayman GTS has the right stuff to be an absolute delight in the corners.”

While certainly quick, one of the Cayman’s biggest selling points is the way it handles. Indeed, with a mid-/rear-mounted engine and relatively low curb weight (roughly 3,000 pounds), not to mention Porsche’s reputation for building razor-sharp track toys, the Cayman GTS has the right stuff to be an absolute delight in the corners.

Making the most of it is the standard Porsche Torque Vectoring system, which throws in a mechanical rear-differential lock to keep the traction flowing. Buyers also get standard Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM). Also note, the PASM lowers the car by 0.39 inches compared to the standard Cayman suspension set-up.

Finally, the Cayman GTS comes standard with the popular Sport Chrono Package, which enables a sportier drive mode perfectly suited for track driving. Features like Launch Control, faster gear changes, a sharper throttle response, and dynamic transmission mounts are all included.

Prices


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739174

Order books are open now for the 2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS, with first deliveries expected to arrive by March of 2018.

Pricing for the Cayman GTS is set $79,800, which is a little over $27,000 more than the standard model Cayman.

Competition

Jaguar F-Type


2017 Jaguar F-Type - image 655250

If you prefer a sports car with an extra dose of grand touring style, then Jag has what you need with the F-Type. Offering a variety of trim levels and price points, Jag’s best fit for the 718 Cayman would be the $80,000 R-Dynamic Coupe, which equips a front-mounted 3.0-liter V-6 that’s supercharged to produce 380 horsepower at the rear wheels. Not only does it look incredible, but it’s also got enough muscle to hit 60 mph in 4.8 seconds and reach a top speed of 161 mph.

Read our full review on the Jaguar F-Type.

BMW M4 Coupe


2018 BMW M4 - image 702089

Slotting in as the Bavarian’s compact two-door performance machine, the M4 Coupe is a muscle-bound luxury sports car dripping in track-inspired styling cues. Even better, it’s got the goods under the hood to back the aesthetic, rocking 425 horsepower and 406 pound-feet of torque thanks to a turbocharged inline six-cylinder. And although pricing starts at $64,200, well below the sticker for the Cayman GTS, the M4’s long list of options is sure to pad the bottom line significantly.

Read our full review on the BMW M4 Coupe.

Chevrolet Corvette Z06


2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 - image 538131

Sometimes, subtlety needs to take a back seat to raw, unbridled performance, and in circumstances such as those, the Bow Tie offers the Corvette Z06. Producing a whopping 650 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque from a supercharged 6.2-liter V-8, this all-American bruiser trounces the competition in terms of acceleration, hitting the 60-mph mark in just 3 seconds flat. Either a seven-speed manual or an eight-speed automatic routes the muscle rearwards, while mammoth grip comes courtesy of real working aero and wide Michelin tires. It’s even got carbon brakes to slow it down. And starting at just over $80,000, the Z06 won’t break the bank either.

Read our full review on the Chevrolet Corvette Z06.

Conclusion


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739166
“The GTS thing is nearly thirty grand more than standard model, which begs the question – is it really worth it to pay the equivalent of a brand new Dodge Challenger or Toyota 86 to get the GTS?”

At first glance, the Porsche 718 Cayman GTS might seem a bit too pricey for its own good. After all, this thing is nearly thirty grand more than standard model, which begs the question – is it really worth it to pay the equivalent of a brand new Dodge Challenger or Toyota 86 to get the GTS?

For many folks, the answer is an unequivocal yes. Sure, in terms of power, the GTS isn’t setting any sort of new benchmarks, and although an extra 15 horses over the S isn’t a lot, it’s good enough to optimize the rest of the equipment you get with the model. The active suspension, Sport Chrono Package, and torque vectoring system are all included with the GTS badges, which should go a long way in making this Cayman even more impressive in the corners.

And at the end of the day, that’s what Porsche’s customers really want. If a blistering 0-to-60 mph is more your speed, then the ‘Vette is where you should look.

Long story short, the Cayman GTS is worth it – just so long as you were originally planning on getting a little heavy-handed with that options list anyway.

  • Leave it
    • Seriously expensive
    • Much faster options already on the market
    • Standard Cayman might be the smarter buy for some

References

Porsche 718


2017 Porsche 718 Cayman - image 697886

Read our full review on the new 2017 Porsche 718 Cayman.

Porsche Cayman


2015 Porsche Cayman GTS - image 546440

Read our full review on the previous 2015 Porsche Cayman GTS.

Porsche Boxster


2015 Porsche Boxster GTS - image 723936

Read our full review on the 2018 Porsche Boxster GTS.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche 718 Cayman GTS

Minor styling changes to the front and rear fascia

Introduced in 2005 as a hardtop coupe iteration of the ever-popular Porsche Boxster roadster, the Cayman gets all the same good stuff as its topless sibling, plus the added rigidity and aggressive looks of a fixed roof. The latest fourth-generation was introduced in 2016, dubbed the 718 after the racer Porsche built in the late ‘50s. Now, Porsche is adding a new GTS iteration for the 2018 model year, and although we’ve seen a Cayman GTS in the past, this is the first time the formula has been applied to the fourth-gen 718. Per usual, the upgrades include a marginal power increase, more standard equipment, blacked-out trim pieces, and high-end interior materials.

Continue reading to learn more about the 2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS.

Official video

Exterior


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739173
“The basics are completely unchanged – you still get a two-door coupe that’s low, wide, and rounded”

Per Porsche tradition, the 718 Cayman GTS looks only marginally different next to non-GTS iterations. The basics are completely unchanged – you still get a two-door coupe that’s low, wide, and rounded. The 911-inspired front end gets teardrop-shaped headlight housings, each with a set of quad lighting elements. The profile leads the eye rearwards, with a swept-back, streamlined shape, plus a prominent intake added just ahead of the rear wheels. The tail is curvy and short, bulging at the sides with sizable hips that give the whole thing a forward-leaning, raked stance.

Basically, it’s a two-door coupe version of the two-door Boxster roadster. We think it looks good, albeit a bit predictable.


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739167
“To help the GTS variant stand out, Porsche added a series of subtle, yet effective upgrades, including redesigned fascias and black trim pieces.”

To help the GTS variant stand out, Porsche added a series of subtle, yet effective upgrades. Kicking it off is a redesigned front fascia, which the Stuttgart automaker has dubbed “Sport Design.” Basically, this encompasses a new lower half for the front bumper, gaining tweaked intakes and additional black components that seem to stretch from fender to fender. The result is a wider look for the GTS.

left
right

The Cayman GTS looks wider than the standard Cayman thanks to a new front fascia.

The complement the new front fascia, Porsche also added a few updates to the tail, although differences here are a bit more difficult to pick out.

Finally, a slew of black accents were added front to back, and include black badging and insignia, as well as a tint added to the front turn signals and taillights. Finishing it off are matte-black wheels, sized at 20 inches in diameter at each of the four corners.

Interior


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739169
“Step into the Cayman GTS’s interior, and you’ll find the traditional two-seat layout, just as you’d expect”

Step into the Cayman GTS’s interior, and you’ll find the traditional two-seat layout, just as you’d expect. The space is tight, hugging the passengers in the typical sports car fashion, while drivers grip a three-spoke multifunction steering wheel. Prominent handles can be found on the doors, while rounded air vents are on the dash. Adorning the center console is a digital infotainment screen, plus a plethora of buttons and switches to adjust the various onboard systems.

All pretty standard stuff, if we’re honest. However, much like the exterior, the GTS stands out thanks to a few choice upgrades. For starters, you’ll notice the Porsche chronometer placed high on the dash, a feature you’ll find on every Cayman GTS thanks to the standard Sport Chrono Package (more on that in the next section).


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739186
“Much like the exterior, the GTS stands out thanks to a few choice upgrades, including a standard chronometer, sport seating, and further black accents.”

Further upgrades include a variety of black accents, plus standard Sport Seats Plus

sitters specifically engineered to provide ample lateral support while exploring the Cayman’s lofty cornering abilities. High on the seats, you’ll find the GTS logo embroidered into the seat headrest, while Alcantara adorns the seats’ center sections. Further Alcantara was added to the steering wheel, center console, and door armrest.

Options include the Navigation Module Package and Connect Plus Package, as well as the Porsche Track Precision App, which basically relays pertinent track data to your smartphone as part of the Sport Chrono Package.

Drivetrain


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739165
“Displacement still comes in at 2.5 liters, but peak power is rated at 365 horses, 15 more than the S.”

Mounted behind the cabin, the Cayman GTS comes equipped with a turbocharged 2.5-liter boxer flat-four engine, the same lump you get with the Cayman S. As an upgrade over the standard 2.0-liter flat-four in the base model Cayman, the S produces as much as 350 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque, a sizeable increase over the base model’s 296 horsepower and 280 pound-feet. Properly motivated, the Cayman S can manage a run to 60 mph in 4.0 seconds and a top speed of 177 mph.

The GTS sees a little more added on top thanks to a new intake plenum and update to the turbocharger. Displacement still comes in at 2.5 liters, but peak power is rated at 365 horses, 15 more than the S. Sending the power to the rear axle is a standard six-speed manual gearbox, although a seven-speed double-clutch automatic (popularly known as the “Porsche Doppelkupplung,” or PDK), is also offered as an available option.


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739185
“The GTS sees a little more added on top thanks to a new intake plenum and update to the turbocharger”

Torque in the 718 Cayman GTS is rated at 317 pound-feet when equipped with a PDK, or 309 pound-feet with the manual transmission. Max torque hits at 1,900 rpm, lasting until 5,000 rpm with the PDK and 5,500 with the manual.

Clearly, the PDK is the faster option, and as such, acceleration with the seven-speed looks like 3.9 seconds to 60 mph – about a tenth of a second quicker than the S. Top speed is rated at 180 mph, 3 mph faster than the S.

Finally, the GTS comes standard with a sport exhaust, finished with black pipe tips to complement the rest of the black trim.

2015 Porsche Cayman GTS Porsche 718 Cayman S 2018 Porsche Cayman GTS
Cylinder layout / number of cylinders Boxer engine / 6 Boxer engine / 4 turbocharged flat-four
Displacement 3.4-liter 2.5 liter 2.5-liter
Engine layout Mid-engine Mid-engine Mid-engine
Horsepower 340 HP @ 6,700 RPM 350 HP @ 6,500 RPM 365 HP @ 6,500 RPM
Torque 280 LB-FT 309 LB-FT 317 LB-FT
Top Track Speed 177 mph 177 MPH 180 MPH
0 – 60 mph 4.7 seconds 4.4 sec/4.2 sec (4.0 sec w/ Sport Chrono) 3.9 seconds

Chassis And Handling


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739179
“The Cayman GTS has the right stuff to be an absolute delight in the corners.”

While certainly quick, one of the Cayman’s biggest selling points is the way it handles. Indeed, with a mid-/rear-mounted engine and relatively low curb weight (roughly 3,000 pounds), not to mention Porsche’s reputation for building razor-sharp track toys, the Cayman GTS has the right stuff to be an absolute delight in the corners.

Making the most of it is the standard Porsche Torque Vectoring system, which throws in a mechanical rear-differential lock to keep the traction flowing. Buyers also get standard Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM). Also note, the PASM lowers the car by 0.39 inches compared to the standard Cayman suspension set-up.

Finally, the Cayman GTS comes standard with the popular Sport Chrono Package, which enables a sportier drive mode perfectly suited for track driving. Features like Launch Control, faster gear changes, a sharper throttle response, and dynamic transmission mounts are all included.

Prices


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739174

Order books are open now for the 2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS, with first deliveries expected to arrive by March of 2018.

Pricing for the Cayman GTS is set $79,800, which is a little over $27,000 more than the standard model Cayman.

Competition

Jaguar F-Type


2017 Jaguar F-Type - image 655250

If you prefer a sports car with an extra dose of grand touring style, then Jag has what you need with the F-Type. Offering a variety of trim levels and price points, Jag’s best fit for the 718 Cayman would be the $80,000 R-Dynamic Coupe, which equips a front-mounted 3.0-liter V-6 that’s supercharged to produce 380 horsepower at the rear wheels. Not only does it look incredible, but it’s also got enough muscle to hit 60 mph in 4.8 seconds and reach a top speed of 161 mph.

Read our full review on the Jaguar F-Type.

BMW M4 Coupe


2018 BMW M4 - image 702089

Slotting in as the Bavarian’s compact two-door performance machine, the M4 Coupe is a muscle-bound luxury sports car dripping in track-inspired styling cues. Even better, it’s got the goods under the hood to back the aesthetic, rocking 425 horsepower and 406 pound-feet of torque thanks to a turbocharged inline six-cylinder. And although pricing starts at $64,200, well below the sticker for the Cayman GTS, the M4’s long list of options is sure to pad the bottom line significantly.

Read our full review on the BMW M4 Coupe.

Chevrolet Corvette Z06


2015 Chevrolet Corvette Z06 - image 538131

Sometimes, subtlety needs to take a back seat to raw, unbridled performance, and in circumstances such as those, the Bow Tie offers the Corvette Z06. Producing a whopping 650 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque from a supercharged 6.2-liter V-8, this all-American bruiser trounces the competition in terms of acceleration, hitting the 60-mph mark in just 3 seconds flat. Either a seven-speed manual or an eight-speed automatic routes the muscle rearwards, while mammoth grip comes courtesy of real working aero and wide Michelin tires. It’s even got carbon brakes to slow it down. And starting at just over $80,000, the Z06 won’t break the bank either.

Read our full review on the Chevrolet Corvette Z06.

Conclusion


2018 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS - image 739166
“The GTS thing is nearly thirty grand more than standard model, which begs the question – is it really worth it to pay the equivalent of a brand new Dodge Challenger or Toyota 86 to get the GTS?”

At first glance, the Porsche 718 Cayman GTS might seem a bit too pricey for its own good. After all, this thing is nearly thirty grand more than standard model, which begs the question – is it really worth it to pay the equivalent of a brand new Dodge Challenger or Toyota 86 to get the GTS?

For many folks, the answer is an unequivocal yes. Sure, in terms of power, the GTS isn’t setting any sort of new benchmarks, and although an extra 15 horses over the S isn’t a lot, it’s good enough to optimize the rest of the equipment you get with the model. The active suspension, Sport Chrono Package, and torque vectoring system are all included with the GTS badges, which should go a long way in making this Cayman even more impressive in the corners.

And at the end of the day, that’s what Porsche’s customers really want. If a blistering 0-to-60 mph is more your speed, then the ‘Vette is where you should look.

Long story short, the Cayman GTS is worth it – just so long as you were originally planning on getting a little heavy-handed with that options list anyway.

  • Leave it
    • Seriously expensive
    • Much faster options already on the market
    • Standard Cayman might be the smarter buy for some

References

Porsche 718


2017 Porsche 718 Cayman - image 697886

Read our full review on the new 2017 Porsche 718 Cayman.

Porsche Cayman


2015 Porsche Cayman GTS - image 546440

Read our full review on the previous 2015 Porsche Cayman GTS.

Porsche Boxster


2015 Porsche Boxster GTS - image 723936

Read our full review on the 2018 Porsche Boxster GTS.

PostHeaderIcon Official: 2018 Porsche 718 GTS Cayman & Boxster

Just as the 718 series was beginning to lose their charm, Porsche announced a new version that brings the luster back to the sports car duo. The 2018 Porsche 718 GTS Cayman and Boxster come with more power, some slight design enhancements, and a whole lot more attitude compared to the regular models.

The power increase in the 2018 Porsche 718 GTS is 15 hp more than the 718 S and 35 hp more than the 718. The 365 horsepower you get now is the result of employing a newly developed intake plenum and an optimized turbocharger for the 2.5 liter flat-four cylinder engine. Standard transmission is a six-speed manual, but a seven-speed Porsche Doppelkupplung (PDK) is also available as an option.

Amazing handling is assured through the addition of  Porsche Torque Vectoring (PTV) including a mechanical rear-differential lock or the Sport Chrono Package, plus Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) all available as standard. The manual gearbox is a lot more fun in a car like the 2018 Porsche 718 GTS. But if it’s outright speed you are after, the PDK performs better,catapulting the Boxster GTS and Cayman GTS from 0 to 60 mph in 3.9 seconds. Top speed is 180 mph.

Visually, there are a number of cues setting the GTS models apart from the rest of 718 family. The biggest highlights include tinted front indicator lights and taillights, model designations in black, a black lower rear fascia, and black tips on the sport exhaust system, plus matte black 20 inch wheels. Inside you find Sport Seats Plus with alcantara and embroidered logo, and alcantara wrapped steering wheel.

Price-wise, the 2018 718 Cayman GTS starts at $79,800, and the convertible 718 Boxster GTS from $81,900.












 

The post Official: 2018 Porsche 718 GTS Cayman & Boxster appeared first on Motorward.

PostHeaderIcon 2018 Porsche 718 GTS Unveiled

Porsche just announced new GTS iterations for the 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman, offering more power, more standard equipment, and blacked-out exterior trim. The star of the show is the mid-mounted, turbocharged, 2.5-liter flat-four engine, which gets a power boost thanks to a new intake plenum and turbo optimization. Peak output now comes 365 horsepower, a 15-horse increase compared to the existing 718 S. Making the cog swaps is a standard six-speed manual, although a seven-speed PDK automatic is also available. Torque is rated at 317 pound-feet if you get the PDK and 309 pound-feet for the manual. Acceleration to 60 mph takes 3.9 seconds with the PDK, while top speed is rated at 180 mph.

Helping it corner is a standard mechanical rear-differential lock and Porsche Torque Vectoring. The Sport Chrono Package, Porsche Active Suspension Management, and a sport exhaust are also standard.

Aesthetically, the new GTS models get black 20-inch wheels, as well as a tweaked front fascia, tinted lights, black badges and trim, and black tips for the exhaust. Inside, you get a standard chronometer on the dash, as well as standard sport seating with the GTS logo embroidered into the headrests. Alcantara is the material of choice for the upholstery, and can also be found on the steering wheel, center console, and armrests.

Pricing starts at $79,900 for the Cayman and $81,900 for the Boxster, which is about $26,000 more than the standard models. Order books are open now, with deliveries expected for March of next year.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction

We’ve heard the story before, and for some reason, the idea keeps coming around. So what is it that I’m talking about? Well, I’m talking about car subscription services. And, the latest to jump into the ranks is Porsche with a new program that will let you pay a monthly fee for access to cars like the Porsche 718 Boxer, Cayman S, Macan S and the Cayenne. The monthly fee? Oh, just $2,000. For that $2,000 you get access to a total of eight different cars. If you want more, you can level up from the “launch” package to the “accelerate” package for an extra $1,000 – bringing the monthly total to $3,000. With that subscription, you’ll get access to models like Macan GTS, Cayenne S E-Hybrid, Panamera 4S, and the Carrera S. Basically, “Launch” gives you the basic, entry-level models while “Accelerate” gives you access to the higher trim levels.

Now, the first thought that really comes to mind is that the price seems quite high, and that wouldn’t necessarily be a wrong thought, but it does include at least some incentives. First off, the subscription includes vehicle tax and registration, insurance, maintenance, and detailing. It’s all based on a mobile phone app, and there is a one-time activation fee of $500 as well. Plus, you’ll have to pass a credit and background check too. Once users receive their first vehicle same day or future vehicle exchanges can be requested via the app. For now, the program is available to those residing in the metro Atlanta area and is made available through a collaboration between Clutch Technologies LLC and Porsche Passport. So, how does this subscription service stack up against purchasing your own Porsche? Well, let’s take a look.

You Might be Overpaying


Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction - image 738045
“For that $2,000 you get access to a total of eight different cars”

Now, the nice thing about this subscription is that you don’t have to pay for insurance, registration, plates, or even cleaning and maintenance. However, that $2,000 package gets you a base level model, so let’s take a look at the base, 911 Carrera. Priced at an entry-level price of $91,100, you might think you’ll be paying a ton, right? Well, with the standard $9,215 down, you can get a 36-month lease, with 15,000 miles per year for 3 years for roughly $1,152 a month – that’s $848 less than that “launch” package above. Will insurance and maintenance allow you to keep your total monthly expense below $2,000? I don’t know, I’ve never insured a Porsche, but I’m sure it varies by location as it does for any other vehicle. If you decide to purchase a base 911, you’re looking at $1,499 with the same down payment, which would put you a little closer to that $2,000 per month bracket with insurance. But, with that in mind, you can also do with the car as you wish, so it may be a fair tradeoff.


Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction - image 738046
“This model will set you back a minimum of $112,000 on the sticker, but with $11,305 down, you can lease one for $1,555 a month or purchase one for $1,840 a month”

Now, let’s talk about the Carrera 4S – one of the same models you get in the $3,000 package and the best Carrera (outside of the cabriolet with the same badge) that you can get. This model will set you back a minimum of $112,000 on the sticker, but with $11,305 down, you can lease one for $1,555 a month or purchase one for $1,840 a month – both significantly cheaper than the $3,000 a month subscription fee even if you cover insurance and maintenance yourself.

Of course, I won’t forget that the program also includes detailing, which can set you back every month or so, if you don’t take care of your own vehicle. And, you can swap out your car for any other of the Porsche lineup (if you have the “Accelerate” package, anyway) so maybe the pricing isn’t all that bad. But, if you’re interested in driving a certain model on a regular, it will most certainly be cheaper to actually buy or lease the car than to opt for this kind of subscription.


Porsche Passport: The Smart Way to Overpay for your German Car Addiction - image 738047
“If you’re interested in driving a certain model on a regular, it will most certainly be cheaper to actually buy or lease the car than to opt for this kind of subscription.”

Now, the question is… What do you think? If you had pockets deep to shell out $2,000 or $3,000 per month, would you do it? Let us know what’s on your mind in the comments section below.

References

Porsche 718


2017 Porsche 718 Cayman - image 697886

Read our full review on the 2017 Porsche 718 Cayman.


2017 Porsche 718 Boxster - image 723935

Read our full review on the 2017 Porsche 718 Boxster.

Porsche 911


2017 Porsche 911 - image 644852

Read our full review on the 2017 Porsche 911.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche Mission E

While considered laughable just a decade or two ago, the idea of a high-performance electric vehicle is now widely accepted in even the most traditional of speed circles. As the list of battery-motivated monster machines continues to grow, Porsche is getting in on the action with its up-and-coming Mission E. As a follow-up to hybrid superstars like the 918 Spyder and the Panamera, the Mission E is slated to become Stuttgart’s very first all-electric vehicle. Porsche teased the new model with a concept at the 2015 Frankfurt Motor Show, and now, we’re getting our very first shots of the production iteration in the wild. Captured out and about doing some real-world testing just outside Porsche’s factory in Weissach, the spy shots reveal just how close the Mission E is to becoming a reality on public roads. Expect specs that either match or beat the Tesla Model S, with several hundred miles of range and a blistering 0-to-60 mph time, not to mention a luxurious cabin space and Nurburgring-tested handling.

While full details are still forthcoming, there’s plenty of info floating around out there to go on in terms of speculation. Regardless, it’s sure to be top-shelf and quite fast, but the question remains – will it be enough to take out the Tesla? Is this finally the Model S killer we’ve been waiting for? We’re still a few years away from the release of the Mission E, so we’ll have to wait, but in the meantime, check out our speculative review.

Updated 10/26/2017 The Porsche Mission E was caught playing on the Nurburgring looking near production ready. Check out the spy shots section below to see it in all its glory!!!!!!

Spy Shots

October 26, 2017 – Porsche Mission E caught testing at Nurburgring


2020 Porsche Mission E - image 740948

2020 Porsche Mission E - image 740943

Exterior


2020 Porsche Mission E - image 736098
“Although this test mule is obviously clad in a bit of camo dress-up, the general shape and prominent lines are clear to see, and in our opinion, it’s gonna be a looker.”

Right away, these recent spy shots get us very excited for the Mission E. Although this test mule is obviously clad in a bit of camo dress-up, the general shape and prominent lines are clear to see, and in our opinion, it’s gonna be a looker. Wide and low are the predominant traits, with curvy hips and a gently sloping roofline that begs for a second look. The headlights are large and triangular, while the front lip is all hard lines and angles.

The aesthetic is a fusion of several influences drawn from across the Porsche line-up. Obviously, the 911 is a major guiding light, as evidenced by that sloping front end and voluptuous rear end. The Panamera can be seen in the profile and roofline, especially with the way the rear doors fall into the rear fender flares. Finally, the hard aero bits are taken from the 918 Spyder, giving it a futuristic tech vibe as well.


2014 Porsche 918 Spyder
- image 519068

2017 Porsche 911 - image 644905

2018 Porsche Panamera - image 681050

Note: Porsche 918 Spyder pictured top, Porsche 911 pictured bottom left, Porsche Panamera pictured bottom right.

Also, never mind those exhaust pipes you see sticking out the rear end – those are most definitely fake, and this thing is most definitely all electric. Nice try, Porsche.

Compared to the concept version of the Mission E, this test mule looks way more toned down. Whereas the concept is like a spaceship that just landed from the planet Zyklox, the test mule looks like it could naturally fall into Porsche’s lineup completely unchanged. And while we would have preferred the crazy look of the concept, we understand why it’s likely not to happen. Just look at it –


2015 Porsche Mission E Concept - image 647936
“While we’d love to see the wild-looking Mission E get the green light in terms of styling, we aren’t holding our breath.”

That said, it’s likely there will be future opportunities for the design study to influence Porsche’s production vehicles when it comes to all-electrics. It’s believed the Mission E will give way to a variety of different body styles, including a compact sedan and possibly even a wagon or hatchback. Perhaps an all-electric halo car is in the cards as well. Either way, look for the Mission E’s styling influence to appear again.

“We expect some form of adaptive aerodynamics to help the Mission E stick on track and glide through the air on the road.”

Getting back to the car at hand, we expect some form of adaptive aerodynamics to help the Mission E stick on track and glide through the air on the road. For example, we wouldn’t be surprised if Porsche added a rear wing similar to that found on the Panamera, rising to create more downforce when needed, and lowering for less drag when cruising.

LED’s will be used for the headlights, with a quartet of forward-facing projectors similar to 918 Spyder. There should also be plenty of carbon fiber elements, with composites applied for both utility (aero enhancements) and aesthetic purposes. It’s possible Porsche will even equip carbon fiber wheels, although it’s much more likely it’ll use alloy units on lower trim levels.

Interior


2015 Porsche Mission E Concept - image 645965

Note: Porsche Mission E Concept pictured here.

“When Porsche revealed the Mission E Concept, we were delighted to find a futuristic, elegant interior design waiting inside the cabin”

When Porsche revealed the Mission E Concept, we were delighted to find a futuristic, elegant interior design waiting inside the cabin. Sporting a sleek, horizontal layout, plus almost no hard inputs (no buttons or toggles beyond a few on the steering wheel and a drive mode selector on the center console), we think this is definitely a step in the right direction for Porsche. Add in the tech-heavy collection of digital screens stretching across the width of the vehicle, form-fitting sport seats with large side bolsters, and attractive three-spoke steering wheel, and we’re eager to see how it all translates into a production model.

And while we’re crossing our fingers the Mission E keeps its sweet interior spec, we’re think the more realistic expectation is that it’ll get an interior similar to the Panamera.


2018 Porsche Panamera - image 701995

Note: Porsche Panamera interior pictured here.

As such, the Mission E will likely get a large center console with a variety of flat-panel buttons and a shifter. A large touchscreen will sit horizontally in the dash, while a second digital display will sit behind the multi-function, three-spoke steering wheel. And although the look is a bit more cluttered and less interesting than the concept, we’d still expect high-end materials like Alcantara and leather, plus brushed aluminum and similar trim. A high-end stereo and LED lighting will round it out.

The doors will also open in the traditional fashion, rather than with rear-hinged suicide doors in back and no B-pillar like the concept. Too bad.

Finally, while the concept shows a four-seat layout, we think it’s much more likely the production version will be a five-seater. After all, the Tesla Model S sits five passengers, as does the recently released Panamera Sport Turismo. Sportier iterations might ditch the middle seat, though.

Drivetrain


2015 Porsche Mission E Concept - image 736441

Note: Porsche Mission E powertrain pictured here.

“Porsche contends the Mission E will do the 0-to-60 mph sprint in roughly 3.5 seconds, while range is pegged at 310 miles per charge.”

Like the Tesla Model S, the Porsche Mission E is likely to get multiple options when it comes to the battery packs. Multiple drive modes are a given, with either extra power in Sport mode or extra range in Eco mode, both of which will be selectable from the center console.

Porsche says the Mission E will offer more than 310 miles of range per charge, but it’s likely that figure is based on the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). As such, it’s possible the Mission E will get something closer to 250 miles per charge when evaluated using the U.S. system (EPA).

Either way, Porsche contends the Mission E will do the 0-to-60 mph sprint in roughly 3.5 seconds. That’s slower than the top-trim Model S, which does the benchmark in 2.5 seconds, although the base-trim Model S does it in 4.2 seconds, so we could see Porsche offering different battery packs to beat each of those figures.

Also, Porsche says the Mission E Concept promises a 0-to-124 mph time under 12 seconds, which is similar to supercars like the McLaren 650S.

Putting the juice to the pavement will be four individual permanent magnet synchronous electric motors, one per wheel. Peak output comes 600 horses, give or take. The electric motors will be similar to what Porsche equips in the LMP1 919 hybrid race car that took the win at Le Mans three times over, so that’s exciting.

“Peak output comes 600 horses, give or take. The electric motors will be similar to what Porsche equips in the LMP1 919 hybrid race car that took the win at Le Mans three times over.”

What’s more, Porsche is reporting it’s developing a new 800-volt charging system. Slated to come to the U.S. via soon-to-be-built Porsche infrastructure, the automaker is already busying itself creating similar stations in Germany. This is important as it addresses two things critical components to the success of the Mission E – the long charge times that are holding back more widespread adoption of the EV platform, plus Tesla’s competing Supercharger network infrastructure. Tesla’s system charges at 480 volts, so the 800-volt system could be seen as a direct assault on the California brand’s established assets. Of course, the Mission E should also be able to charge from a normal wall socket, albeit at a significantly slower pace. However, if you can find a Porsche socket, you’ll get a charging rate of 350-kW, which can give the Mission E an 80-percent charge in just 15 minutes. And that’s great news for anyone looking forward to seeing more EVs on the road.

Chassis And Handling


2020 Porsche Mission E - image 736112
“Rather than rehashing the MSB platform that underpins the Panamera, the Mission E will get its own bones tailored to all-electric performance.”

Under the skin, the Porsche Mission E is rumored to utilize a platform dubbed J1, which was designed specifically for all-electric models. That’s right – rather than rehashing the MSB platform that underpins the Panamera, the Mission E will get its own bones tailored to all-electric performance. What’s more, the J1 platform is rumored to provide the bones for Audi’s all-electric SUV, the e-Tron quattro, plus Lamborghini might even use it for its own all-electric car.

Either way, we fully expect the Mission E to be one helluva performer on the track. With go-faster tech like advanced torque vectoring capabilities and four-wheel steering, the Mission E will be able to manage its all-electric heft with aplomb. Complementing this will be the positioning of the requisite lithium-ion batter pack, which will be mounted under the floor and between the axles for optimum weight distribution.

All told, we fully expect the Mission E to be the EV of choice when it comes to four-door performance, especially against the straight-line squirt of the Tesla Model S. Porsche even says it expects the Mission E to circle the Nurburgring in less than 8 minutes.

Prices


2020 Porsche Mission E - image 736099

It’s highly likely the Porsche Mission E will see a release date some time in 2019, with a preemptive debut later in 2018.

It’s expected to slot in at around $85,000, about $17,000 more than the base price for the Tesla Model S. That said, it’ll likely have the performance and range to make up for the price range. What’s more, top trim levels will likely see pricing approaching the $200,000 mark, especially when checking off the high-end options.

Competition

Tesla Model S


2017 Tesla Model S - image 703865

As if it wasn’t painfully obvious already, the Porsche Mission E’s primary competition will come from the Tesla Model S. As if to reiterate this point, the recent spy images even show a convoy of Tesla vehicles behind the test mule, so it’s quite obvious where Porsche’s benchmark is coming from. And rightfully so – the Model S essentially upended the world of EVs when it debuted 2012, offering sexy styling, a sumptuous interior, impressive range, and even more impressive performance. Now, you can get an S with supercar levels of performance, and the Mission E will need to bring it’s A-game if it hopes to offer a challenge.

Read our full review on the 2017 Tesla Model S.

Conclusion


2020 Porsche Mission E - image 736095

All told, we’re chomping at the bit to learn more about the Porsche Mission E. The prospect of finally getting an honest-to-goodness Tesla Model S fighter is enticing, to say the least. Add in the fact it’s coming from one of the most respected sports car makers in the world, and things are looking up for EV performance enthusiasts.

Make no mistake – this isn’t just a Panamera with a bigger battery. The Mission E looks like it’ll gets its own platform, styling, and equipment to take on the venerable Tesla sedan. And when automakers compete at a level like this, consumers win.

  • Leave it
    • Will it have the range to compete?
    • Will you need to pay out the nose for any real performance?
    • Still several years away, and the EV market isn’t resting on its laurels

References

Porsche Mission E Concept


2015 Porsche Mission E Concept - image 645964

Read our full review on the Porsche Mission E Concept.

Porsche Panamera


2018 Porsche Panamera - image 681041

Read our full review on the 2018 Porsche Panamera.

Porsche 918 Spyder


2014 Porsche 918 Spyder
- image 719974

Read our full review on the 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder.

PostHeaderIcon Porsche GT3 Touring Package Inspires More “Pure” Models

When Porsche unveiled the new Touring Package for the 911 GT3 at the Frankfurt Motor Show it was hailed as a car for 911 purists. The wingless, manual GT3 is a sort of back-to-basic, raw sports car for those find PDKs and downforce a tad boring. Now it seems Porsche wants to take this idea further with more ‘focused’ driver’s models, namely a new Cayman GT4. 

The word on the backstreets of the automotive blogsphere is that Porsche is developing a new version of the hugely popular Cayman GT4 which will be even more of a pure driver’s car than the Porsche GT3 Touring Package. In fact, Porsche is apparently adopting this whole ‘pure and simple’ thing as a theme for their future products. This is obviously great news for hardcore Porsche fans who like their cars raw and bloody. But the more typical Porsche driver – you know, your dentists and talent agents and real estate moguls – may not like the idea of Porsches getting sportier, which means compromising on luxury and comfort.

Now, should Porsche green light a new Cayman GT4 based on the 718 model, which they probably will, the car will have a six-cylinder engine. According to company’s officials who spoke to Autocar, Porsche will not do a high-performance four-cylinder model as previously speculated, because it doesn’t work financially. But such a Porsche with a flat-six will have to be a limited production model, something the new Porsche GT3 Touring Package isn’t. It will make choosing the right Porsche even more difficult than before, given how many choices you have. But we love the idea of simplification on the whole as it could result in some truly iconic cars.






The post Porsche GT3 Touring Package Inspires More “Pure” Models appeared first on Motorward.

PostHeaderIcon The 911 GT2 RS Lapped the Nurburgring How Fast?

I knew that the new Porsche 911 GT2 RS was amazing fast, but boy, I certainly didn’t see this coming. The German manufacturer just posted the car’s official lap on the Nurburgring Nordschleife, and it turns out that the 911 GT2 RS almost set a new world record at six minutes and 47 seconds. Porsche actually claims it is a new world record, but this depends on whether we take the NextEV Nio EP9’s lap of 6:45.90 minute into account. Either way, the 911 GT2 RS is the quickest Porsche ever and the fastest gasoline-powered vehicle on the “Green Hell.”

Less than two seconds slower than NextEV’s all-electric sports car, the 911 GT2 RS completed the Nordschleife almost a second quicker than the Radical SR8LM, which held the record for a whopping seven years. More impressively, it lapped the German course almost five seconds quicker than the Lamborghini Huracan Performante and almost 10 clicks faster than the Porsche 918 Spyder! This amazing benchmark took even Porsche by surprise, with the company’s vice president of motorsport and GT cars claiming the Germans set a target of “less than seven minutes and five seconds.” Beating it by almost 18 seconds is quite the achievement.

Continue reading for the full story.

The Fastest Porsche Ever Built!

This new lap time not only puts the 911 GT2 RS at the top of the all-time Nurburgring benchmarks but also speaks volumes of the car’s performance. Let’s face it, GT2 and GT3 Porsches have always been among the fastest road-legal sports cars, but to be quicker than the 919 Spyder and supercars like the Lamborghini Aventador SV, Nissan GT-R Nismo, and Gumpert Apollo Speed places you in a whole new league. And unlike some of the records out there, Porsche ran this impressive lap with a stock car. Now that’s a record that’s tough to beat, and it will probably take a successor to the 919 Spyder to do it.

10 fastest cars around Nurburgring

References

Porsche 911 GT2 RS


2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS - image 721933

Read our full review on the 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS.


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PostHeaderIcon 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Nurburgring Record Is In: 6:47.3

Porsche announced today the official Nurburgring Nordschleife lap time of the new Porsche 911 GT2 RS. We knew from the rumors that the record is under 7 minutes. What we didn’t know was how much under. Turns out, a lot! The GT2 RS has lapped the Green Hell in 6 minutes 47.3 seconds. 

And it’s not like Porsche 911 GT2 RS broke a sweat doing that unbelievably quick time. Porsche test drivers have been doing steady sub 7-minute laps for a while. Lars Kern (30) from Germany and Nick Tandy (32) from the UK broke the previous record for road-approved sports cars (6 minutes, 52.01 seconds) in their first attempt and subsequently finished five laps in under 6 minutes, 50 seconds.

The actual record was set by Tandy whose usual ‘office’ is the Le Mans prototype Porsche 919 Hybrid. Even with a bit of jet lag – he’d just arrived from Texas – the man managed to bang in that excellent time which is a testament to the capabilities of the GT2 RS. In case you have forgotten,the 1,470 kg 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS packs a colossal 700-hp from a biturbo flat-six engine. Even with rear-wheel-drive the car can hit 100 km/h from zero in 2.8 seconds, and if you are brave enough to keep your foot on the pedal on the right, it’ll eventually do 340 km/h.

 Frank-Steffen Walliser, Vice President Motorsport and GT Cars, said: “At the start of the development process, we set ourselves a lap time target for the GT2 RS of less than 7 minutes and 5 seconds. The credit for beating this target by 17.7 seconds goes to our development engineers, mechanics and drivers, who demonstrated an exceptionally strong team performance. This result makes it official: The GT2 RS is not only the most powerful, but also the fastest 911 ever built”.

Andreas Preuninger, Director GT Model Line, says: “It’s not just the record time achieved by the GT2 RS that demonstrates the vehicle’s class, but also its consistent performance in every lap. We’re particularly proud of the fact that this was achieved with two different vehicles and two different drivers, as this underlines the GT2 RS’s ability to reproduce this record result over and over again”.



The post 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS Nurburgring Record Is In: 6:47.3 appeared first on Motorward.

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